BSc (Hons) Diagnostic Radiography Integrated Degree Apprenticeship

Southwark Campus

Mode: Full-time

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Contact information

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Tel: 0207 815 7500

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Overview

The primary aim of the BSc (Hons) Diagnostic Radiography Integrated Degree Apprenticeship is to produce competent Diagnostic Radiographer practitioners who are fit for award, practice, purpose, and profession and who are able to:

  • Demonstrate strong professional role identity, autonomy, accountability and resilience and be able to act as ambassadors for the profession;
  • Work in partnership with peers, colleagues, service users and carers, to promote participation, health and wellbeing;
  • Respond appropriately and sensitively to the needs of service users in an anti-discriminatory, inclusive and culturally competent way;
  • Practise radiography in the context of current and emergent services and work effectively within a changing political and socio-economic climate;
  • Contribute to the evolution of the profession through the implementation of evidence-based practice;
  • Take professional and personal responsibility for life-long learning.

Modules

    Foundation module

  • Introduction to Radiation Science  
    This is a foundation module aimed at students who'll be working with ionising radiation in a clinical environment. The module will introduce the basic concept of atomic structure and will then build on this to explain how x-rays are produced and how radiation interacts with matter. Fundamentally, this module will concentrate on using radiation in a safe manner and will therefore include sessions on radiobiology (including genetics), radiation protection (including personal dosimetry and QA) and the legislation surrounding the use of ionising radiation in the clinical environment.
    Level 4. 20 Credits. Formative assessment: Mock examination. Summative assessment: 2-hour unseen written examination. 40% pass mark. 100% weighting.
  • Year 1

  • Systemic Anatomy and Physiology 1
    The module is designed to provide knowledge of the anatomy and physiology of the following key body systems: integumentary, respiratory, gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, and urinary. Some aspects of the physiology and pathology of the musculoskeletal system will also be addressed. Level 4. 20 Credits. Formative assessment: Mock examination. Summative assessment: 2 hour unseen written examination. 40% pass mark. 100% weighting
  • Principles of Clinical Reasoning in Medical Imaging
    This module offers a foundation for students undertaking the diagnostic imaging pathway. It provides a context for the practice of diagnostic imaging and a basic insight into the radiological environment and associated general principles. In addition, the module introduces the skills of clinical reasoning and reflection, evaluating information to facilitate evidence-based practice, and problem-solving within the context of the clinical environment. Level 4. 20 Credits.Formative assessment: 500 word draft or plan of summative assignment. Summative assessment: 3000 word written assignment OR, 20 minute podcast. 40% pass mark. 100% weighting.
  • Concepts of Interprofessional and Collaborative Practice
    This module offers a foundation for students undertaking the diagnostic imaging pathway. It provides a context for the practice of diagnostic imaging and a basic insight into the radiological environment and associated general principles. In addition, the module introduces the skills of clinical reasoning and reflection, evaluating information to facilitate evidence-based practice, and problem-solving within the context of the clinical environment.Level 4. 20 Credits. Formative assessment: 500 word draft or plan of summative assignment. Summative assessment: 3000 word written assignment. 100% weighting
  • Medical Imaging Practice 1
    This module acts as a basis for the development of requisite skills and competence in the practice of routine, conventional diagnostic imaging. It's clinically based and requires that you have access to an agreed and formally accredited practice placement site. Level 4. 40 Credits. Formative assessment: Mock examinations and continuous clinical monitoring via clinical portfolio.  Summative assessment: Semester 1 a 2 hour unseen written examination 50% weighting, Semester 2 a 1 hour unseen workstation examination 50% weighting, and Clinical Portfolio Pass/Fail. Students are required to achieve a pass in all elements of assessment.
  • Medical Imaging Modalities
    This is module aimed to develop students understanding of specialist imaging modalities and their application in a clinical environment. The module will introduce the basic concept of image production of CT, MRI, ultrasound and nuclear medicine.  
    Level 5. 20 Credits. Formative assessment: Group presentation. Summative assessment: Poster presentation examination. 40% pass mark. 100% weighting.
  • Year 2

  • Systemic Anatomy and Physiology 2
    The module is designed to provide knowledge of the anatomy and physiology of the following key body systems: reproductive, vascular and hepatobiliary. Level 5. 20 Credits. Formative assessment: Mock examination. Summative assessment: 2 hour unseen written examination. 40% pass mark. 100% weighting.
  • Medical Imaging of Pathology and Disease Processes
    This module aims to provide students with knowledge of common disease processes in selected body systems and recognise the impact these diseases have on other systems. Level 5. 20 Credits. Formative assessment: 500 word draft or plan of summative assignment. Summative assessment: 3000 word written assignment OR, 20 minute podcast. 40% pass mark. 100% weighting
  • Appraising Evidence for Research Informed Practice
    This module aims to develop students’ appreciation for the role of research and evaluation in contemporary healthcare practice. This is done by enabling students understanding of the research process by teaching them how to read, interpret and appraise primary research that is relevant to practice. Level 5. 20 Credits. Formative assessment: 500 word draft or plan of summative assignment.Summative assessment: 3000 word written assignment. 40% pass mark. 100% weighting.
  • Medical Imaging Practice 2
    This module continues to develop student’s clinical skills and competence in the practice of routine, conventional diagnostic imaging and introduces specialist modalities such as CT, ultrasound and nuclear medicine.
    Level 5. 40 Credits. Formative assessment: Mock examinations and continuous clinical monitoring via clinical portfolio  
    Summative assessment: Semester 1 a 2 hour unseen written examination 50% weighting, Semester 2 a 1 hour unseen workstation examination 50% weighting, and Clinical Portfolio Pass/Fail. Students are required to achieve a pass in all elements of assessment.
  • Professional Identity, Autonomy and Accountability
    This module has a focus on accountability, professional behaviours and continual professional development.
    Level 6. 20 Credits. Formative assessment: 500 word draft or plan of summative assignment. Summative assessment: 3000 word written assignment OR, 20 minute podcast. 40 % pass. 100% weighting
  • Year 3

  • Interpretation of Medical Imaging
    This module offers the student an opportunity to interpret radiographic images. This module will provide the student with the advanced clinical perspective necessary for them to make an effective and safe contribution in their first clinical appointment.
    Level 6. 20 Credits. Formative assessment: Mock written exam. Summative assessment: 2-hour unseen work station written examination. 40% Pass mark. 100% Weighting
  • Contemporary Issues in Medical Imaging
    The main focus of the module will be an understanding of the application of evidence-based practice within diagnostic imaging.  It seeks to address emerging topics which are of importance to imaging practitioners, service users and health care providers. It is essential that this module maintains a contemporary focus throughout and therefore the indicative content, within a broad structure, will be governed to some extent by changes in health care policy and areas of student interest.
    Level 6. 20 Credits. Formative assessment: 500 word draft of the summative assignment. Summative assessment: 3000 literature review. 40% pass mark. 100% weighting
  • Improving quality, change management and leadership
    This module is the final interprofessional learning module that will explore leadership, quality improvement and change within organisations from an interprofessional perspective. The module looks at a strategic, evidence based approach to change management in a range of environments. Level 6. 20 Credits. Formative assessment: 500 word draft or plan of summative assignment. Summative assessment: 3000 word written assignment OR, 20 minute podcast 100% weighting
  • Medical Imaging Practice 3
    This module continues to develop student’s clinical skills and competence in the practice of routine, conventional diagnostic imaging and introduces specialist imaging such as MRI, neuroradiology, cardiac and breast imaging.
    Level 6. 40 Credits. Formative assessment: Mock examinations and continuous clinical monitoring via clinical portfolio  
    Summative assessment: Semester 1 a 2 hour unseen written examination 50% weighting, Semester 2 a 1 hour unseen workstation examination 50% weighting, and Clinical Portfolio Pass/Fail. Students are required to achieve a pass in all elements of assessment.

Employability

Graduates from this course are eligible to apply for registration as a diagnostic radiographer with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC), allowing them to practice within the NHS as well as the private sector both in the UK and abroad.

Subject to approval by the professional body.


Health and Care Professionals Council logo

The Health and Care Professions Council is the regulator of health, Psychological and Social professionals

College of Radiographers logo

The Society and College of Radiographers is the professional body representing the radiography workforce


Facilities

Teaching and learning

Study Year

Semester 1

(September – January)

Semester 2

(January – June)

Summer

(June – August)

Credits

Year 1

(months 1-12)

LSBU and work-based learning

LSBU and work-based learning

Work-based learning

120

Year 2

(months 13-24)

LSBU and work-based learning

LSBU and work-based learning

Work-based learning

120

Year 3

(months 25-36)

LSBU and work-based learning

LSBU and work-based learning

Work-based learning

120

  

Total

360 credits

for award

A varied teaching and learning diet is used to allow apprentices to learn in a variety of ways and build competence.

  • Module co-ordinators provide material online and are encouraged to explore the use of online technologies that provide virtual teaching and assessment environments
  • Lectures will be used to introduce and provide new information and update existing knowledge
  • Tutorials with individuals and groups
  • Academic workshops, including problem-based learning activities
  • Formative assessments
  • Skills lab workshops to prepare apprentices for clinical placements
  • Critical incident analysis to reflect upon practice-based issues
  • Structured reading/guided study
  • Workbooks to develop and update knowledge
  • Online group work and e-learning strategies
  • Small group exercises

Apprentice-Directed Learning

Apprentice-directed learning is an important feature. Apprentices receive a high level of direction and structure to support them in developing the skills

and abilities to be able to direct their own learning at the beginning of the programme. Over time, the level of support and structure decreases as the programme develops with the apprentice becoming increasingly autonomous through being able to direct and manage their own learning.

Work-based learning

For apprentices, learning within and from the workplace can bring advantages. For example, it has been suggested that the gap between learning in higher education and learning at work can be narrowed (Tynj’al’a, 2008) and learners can develop capable practice, and support personal development.

Resources

Resources include:

  • Large and small teaching spaces.
  • Skills laboratories, including specialist Diagnostic Radiography laboratory
  • Manual and Handling suites (Hospital, ward set up)
  • Computer laboratories.
  • Library.
  • Work-based learning environments.

Staff

Staff who teach on the course come from the Division of Radiography and ODP and more specifically are trained and experienced Diagnostic Radiographers, with input from other Divisions in the Institute of Health and Social Care. Service users and people with lived experience also contribute to delivery of the course.

Personal tutoring

As a Health and Social Care student, you will be allocated a named tutor during your first three weeks at LSBU.  The role of your tutor is to be your primary contact for academic and professional development support.

Your tutor will support you to get the most of your time at LSBU, providing advice and signposting to other sources of support in the University. They should be the first person at the university that you speak to if you are having any difficulties that are affecting your work. These could be academic, financial, health-related or another type of problem.

You will have appointments with your personal tutor once a year for up to 30 minutes throughout your course. You can contact your tutor for additional support by email.

Entry requirements

It is anticipated that applicants will have a wide a variety of academic backgrounds, but should possess one of the following:

  • A Level BBB in Science or;
  • BTEC National Diploma DDD in Science or professionally relevant subject or;
  • Access to HE Diploma in Science or similar with 24 Distinctions of which 14 must be in Science or;
  • Equivalent level 3 qualifications at 112 UCAS points also considered or;
  • Foundation degree/diploma (or similar), 120 credits or;
  • Bachelor's degree in a relevant science subject or;
  • International Baccalaureate in a relevant science subject (22 points).
  • Applicants must hold 5 GCSEs A-C including Maths, English and Science or equivalent (reformed GCSEs grade 4 or above).

Accreditation of prior learning

Potential apprentices may apply for exemption for certain modules on the basis of prior learning and/or experience through the AP(E)L process when applying. This will be reviewed by the APEL team in the Institute of Health and Social Care for consideration of exemption and following a skills scan administered by the University Central Apprenticeship Team.

Course status

  • Accreditation and Course validation status

    This course is validated by London South Bank University. Applications are being accepted.

How to apply

Home/EU applicants

Mode Duration Start date Application code Application method
Mode
Part-time
Duration
3 years
Start date
September
Application code
5812
Application method

An Apprenticeship Standard is comprised of a programme of study, an End Point Assessment and on-the-job learning. This means that in addition to meeting academic requirements, you’ll  need to be employed in a role related to your apprenticeship. The process of applying depends on whether you have an employer to sponsor (and support) you.

If you are employed and your employer has confirmed they will support your apprenticeship:

You are welcome to submit an application via our application system. You’ll need to provide details of your employment/employer as part of the application. You’ll also need to ensure you and your employer meet the requirements – find out who can be an apprentice to see if you meet the entry requirements and employer commitments to find out more about your employer’s role.

If you are not employed:

  • You will need to find a job role related to the apprenticeship you wish to apply for, with an employer who is happy to support you. If you would like to find an employer to support your apprenticeship with LSBU, you can search which employers are currently advertising Apprenticeships via the National Apprenticeship Service website searching for ‘London South Bank University’ as keywords.
  • If there are no search results, this means there are currently no vacancies. We update our vacancies regularly, so please do check back regularly.
  • Many employers advertise their apprenticeship vacancies on their websites or via other portals. You could search for ‘find an apprenticeship’ online.
  • When you’re ready to apply, see the government's advice on how to write a winning apprenticeship application and make your application.

Further information for apprentices

If you’re a prospective apprentice, you can find out more about who can be an apprentice on our student pages.

Further information for employers

If you’re an employer, you can find information about the employer commitments and further related information on the related pages for business.

See our admissions policy 1.0 MB and complaints policy 516.0 KB.

Home/EU postgraduate students and research students should apply through our dedicated application system.

Full details of how to do this are supplied on our How to apply section for postgraduate students and our How to apply section for research students.

International applicants should use our international application system. Full details can be found on our How to apply section for international students.

See our admissions policy (PDF File 1,043 KB) and complaints policy (PDF File 516 KB).

Considering your application

Your application will be circulated to a number of potential supervisors who will look at your academic qualifications, experience and the research proposal to decide whether your research interest is something that could be supervised at LSBU.

There will also be an interview either by telephone or at the University. If you are successful you will be offered a place on a course and informed of the next enrolment date. The whole process normally takes between six to eight weeks, from receipt of your application to a decision being made about your application at the School.

Prepare to start

There are steps the apprentices, the employer and the University need to complete before you start your course. Take a look at the steps to be completed in the Enrolment section. Employers may also like to look at our steps to offering an apprenticeship.

Prepare to start

We help our students prepare for university even before the semester starts. To find out when you should apply for your LSBU accommodation or student finance read the How to apply tab for this course.

Enrolment

Before you start your course we’ll send you information on what you’ll need to do before you arrive and during your first few days on campus. You can read about the process on our Enrolment pages.

Fees and funding

The individual fee for this course is shown above. For more information, including how and when to pay, see our fees and funding section for postgraduate students.

See our Tuition Fees Regulations (PDF File 226 KB) and Refund Policy (PDF File 775 KB).

We have a range of PhD Scholarships available in partnership with businesses and organisations; read notices of PhD studentships.

Contact information

Course Enquiries - UK

Tel: 0207 815 7500

Order a prospectus

Live Chat

Any questions? Use the green bubble on the bottom right hand corner to start a live chat with us

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