Economic crises, recessions, and the employee experience in SMEs: Why should employers care and what can they do about it?

Back again for 2021, LSBU Business School's Professional Lecture Series will address & explore a new variety of relevant & topical issues Register Now

About this event

Date: 12 May 2021
Location: This event will be delivered virtually.
Time: 13:00 - 14:00
Price: Free
Telephone: Please email
Email: events@lsbu.ac.uk
Organiser: LSBU Business School

LSBU Business School are pleased to present a third instalment of its Professional Lecture Series. When lockdown began last year, we maintained our commitment to address the learning needs of our staff, students, local business communities & beyond by delivering a series of virtual lectures with the aim of providing professional training & insights. Given that we are still operating remotely and following on from the success of last year's lectures, colleagues from LSBU's Business School have come together to develop an insightful & engaging new programme to carry us through to summer 2021.

An opportunity open to all, and with the broad business community with whom we are engaged in mind, our aim is to support the community and facilitate networks, especially in light of how the pandemic has affected so many business owners. This is reflected in many of the topics we will be addressing.

'Economic crises, recessions, and the employee experience in SMEs: Why should employers care and what can they do about it?' withDr Rea Prouska, Associate Professor of Human Resource Management, LSBU

Description: Economic crises and recessions impact on how people are managed and experience work. Employers are faced with a challenging agenda of accomplishing organisational goals while supporting employees. This lecture will explore the impact of economic crises and recessions on the employee experience in SMEs. It will refer to the 2008 global economic crisis and the recent COVID-19 crisis, both of which pushed economies around the world into long-term recession. To address such events, SMEs have taken drastic measures to reduce cost, creating adverse working conditions for employees, such as increased workloads, decreased earnings and decreased job security. This lecture discusses why employers should care about the negative impact such events have on employees and what they can do about it.

Participants at this lecture will gain insight on:

  • How economic crises and recessions affect employees, focusing on the SME sector.
  • Why it is important that employers understand the impact of such events on employees.
  • What employers and HR in these organisations can do to support employees in this respect.

Structure

1pm - Lecture: Economic crises, recessions, and the employee experience in SMEs: Why should employers care and what can they do about it?

1.30pm - Q & A plus Networking

2pm - Close

This event will be delivered online using Zoom. The joining instructions will be emailed to you the day before the event takes place.

To check out the other event in the LSBU Business School Lecture Series, click here.

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Biography

Dr Rea Prouska is Associate Professor of HRM at LSBU Business School, London South Bank University. Her research expertise is on work relationships (employee voice/silence) and working life (working conditions, quality of working life). She has published in academic journals such as Human Resource Management Journal, British Journal of Management, Economic and Industrial Democracy and European Journal of Industrial Relations, and co-authored/co-edited books. Recent books include: Managing People in Small and Medium Enterprises in Turbulent Contexts (2019) and Critical Issues in Human Resource Management (2019). Rea is an Associate Board Member of the journal Work, Employment and Society and an Editorial Advisory Board Member of the journal Employee Relations. She is also currently leading a Special Issue in Human Resource Management Journal on the nexus between macro-level turbulence and the worker experience in HRM.