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BSc (Hons) Occupational Therapy

Southwark Campus

Mode: Full-time; Part-time

Overview

A rewarding occupation

This full-time programme provides an understanding of the science and artistry of occupational therapy. You should possess a keen interest in activity-based therapy, rehabilitation, good communication skills, and a desire to work with people to achieve their goals and promote independence.

OT

We offer the opportunity for all undergraduate Home/EU students to undertake a work placement, internship or work experience while studying a full-time course starting in September 2020.

Why Occupational Therapy at LSBU?

No. 1 in London for student satisfaction and graduate prospects in Occupational Therapy (Complete University Guide 2019).
Professional accreditation: we’re accredited by the Royal College of Occupational Therapists.
1st in London for career prospects (Guardian League Table 2020).
Professional links: this course can enable you to become a registered occupational therapist, approved by the Health and Care Professions Council.
Work placements across a variety of clinical settings, such as NHS acute Trusts, community placements and the independent sector.
Our three Occupational Therapy Labs, with facilities including simulated living spaces and artistic intervention tools.
1st in London for teaching, academic support, learning opportunities, assessment and feedback (National Student Survey 2019).

Accreditations

Key course information - ordered by mode
Mode Duration Start date Location
Mode
Full-time
Duration
3 years
Start Date
September
Location
Southwark Campus
Mode
Part-time
Duration
4 years
Start Date
September
Location
Southwark Campus

Modules

During your course, you’ll study concepts of interprofessional and collaborative practice and have an introduction to occupational focused practice. Alongside your occupational therapy practice placements, you’ll be learning occupational performance analysis and human function, appraising evidence for research informed practice. You’ll also study improving quality, change management and leadership, as well a professional identity, autonomy and accountability. The course is assessed as 69% coursework.

Some compulsory skills sessions may take place in the evening.

Year 1

  • Concepts of interprofessional and collaborative practice
    This module introduces students to the place and value of interprofessional and collaborative working in health and social care delivery. The module aims to support the development of the necessary communication, personal, partnership working and reflective practice skills required to meet the needs of clients/carers and diverse populations who are at the centre of interprofessional health and social care delivery. 
  • Exploring occupation
    This introductory module introduces students to the key theoretical concepts informing and influencing current occupational therapy practice. Through the study of occupational science, students explore the personal, social and cultural meanings of everyday occupations and how a person’s engagement in these occupations affects their health and wellbeing across the life course. 
  • Introduction to occupational focused practice
    This module will develop students’ knowledge and skills to relate occupational therapy theories to practice. It will facilitate students to consider the occupational therapy process when working with adults and older adults in a range of health and social care settings and enable them to explore health and well-being from an occupational perspective with a particular focus on this service user group. 
  • Occupational therapy practice placement 1
    This module prepares the students for their introduction to professional practice, which is a time for personal and professional beginnings. The module will foster an overall appreciation of the occupational therapy process. Students will begin to conceptualise the influences on health and social care organisations, professionalism and professionals. This will enable the students to better understand and appreciate the context of their first occupational therapy placement. 
  • Occupational performance analysis and human function
    This module develops the students’ understanding of occupational performance. Students will develop an understanding of the human body, the body systems including motor and process skills, and develop an understanding of relevant underpinning knowledge and theory such as anatomy and physiology. 

Year 2

  • Appraising evidence for research informed practice
    This module extends students’ understanding of the concept of evidence based practice and research in practice. The module equips students with the core skills and understanding to appraise evidence and assess its appropriateness to be implemented into practice. 
  • Occupational therapy practice placement 2  
    This placement will support students to begin developing skills in implementing person centred, occupation focused occupational therapy practice. This is facilitated through the provision of guidelines and policies that govern practice. Students will identify and question the consequences of occupational disruption in relation to key conditions.
  • Occupational therapy practice placement 3
    This module is set within the context of critical disability studies with a focus on the environment and working in partnership with individuals, groups and communities to understand the factors impacting on health and wellbeing. It will focus on developing the students’ understanding of the concepts of environment and disability through the exploration of social inclusion, equality and diversity, occupational identity and performance. Emphasis is placed on the evaluation of occupation based interventions used to promote health and wellbeing.  
  • Delivering occupation focused practice
    This module develops students’ knowledge of the application of occupational therapy theory in practice, with emphasis on children and young people. Knowledge development occurs in line with the philosophical and person-centred basis of occupational therapy and the construction of childhood occupations. The module will explore a range of occupational performance and participation challenges/conditions relevant to physical, learning disability and mental health fields of occupational therapy practice. 

Year 3

  • Improving quality, change management and leadership 
    This module is the final interprofessional learning module that will explore leadership, quality improvement and change within organisations from an interprofessional perspective. The module looks at a strategic, evidence based approach to change management in a range of environments. It will integrate the perspectives of service users and take an interprofessional approach. 
  • Professional identity, autonomy and accountability
    This module focuses on consolidating knowledge and skills related to personal management of and engagement in lifelong learning. It prepares students to develop their professional identity as they transition to the workforce. The concept of the self as an accountable and resilient professional will have been introduced in year one, and built upon across year two of the course via the use of a professional development portfolio.  In this final year three module, all strands of the associated activities such as reflections on experience, and evidence of professional growth and development are drawn together. 
  • Research and evidence based practice in occupational therapy
    This module will consolidate the students’ critical understanding of evidence informed practice in occupational therapy by enabling students to select a contemporary aspect of practice on which to base an evidenced enquiry. The module supports current drivers in health and social care to ensure practice is informed by evidence, implemented by practitioners who are knowledgeable, critically reflective and autonomous and who respect the needs and rights of services users. 
  • Occupational therapy practice placement 4
    This module includes the final placement on the programme. It prepares students to be competent for practice and to make the transition from student to newly qualified occupational therapist. This is achieved by demonstrating achievement of the Health and Care Professions Council Standards of Proficiency and the Royal College of Occupational Therapists (2014) graduate competencies.

The part-time pathway will also cover these modules over a four year period.

Employability

Once you graduate you’ll be eligible to eligible to apply for registration as an occupational therapist with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC). This allows you to practice within the NHS, community services and local authorities, as well as the private sector. Thanks to this course, you’ll be equipped with the skills you need to work as an occupational therapist with both adults and children who have complex health and social needs.

You might also choose to apply for further study at postgraduate level. We have a part-time MSc Occupational Therapy course that’s suitable for graduates with professional practice experience. You can find out more about this course in ouronline CPPD prospectus.

Employability Service

We are University of the Year for Graduate Employment for the second year in a row - The Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2018, 2019.

At LSBU, we want to set you up for a successful career. During your studies – and for two years after you graduate – you’ll have access to our Employability Service, which includes:

  • An online board where you can see a wide range of placements: part-time, full-time or voluntary. You can also drop in to see our Job Shop advisers, who are always available to help you take the next step in your search.
  • Our Careers Gym offering group workshops on CVs, interview techniques and finding work experience, as well as regular presentations from employers across a range of sectors.

Our Student Enterprise team can also help you start your own business and develop valuable entrepreneurial skills.

Professional links

This course is approved by the Health and Care Professions Council, the regulator of health, Psychological and Social professionals. And it’s accredited by the Royal College of Occupational Therapists, the professional association for staff in Occupational Therapy.

The course fulfils the requirements of the World Federation of Occupational Therapists, which makes you eligible to apply for international employment. The programme is delivered in partnership with health and social care authorities and University staff. We’re actively involved with Knowledge Transfer Partnerships and endeavour to expand our links with the voluntary and independent sector.


Health and Care Professionals Council logo

The Health and Care Professions Council is the regulator of health, Psychological and Social professionals.


College of Occupational Therapists logo

Thel Royal College of Occupational Therapists is the professional association for staff in Occupational Therapy.


Placements

During the course you’ll spend a third of your time involved in practice within a broad variety of healthcare and social care settings – and the rest in academic study. A practice placement lets you put theory into practice, by working with a range of health professionals in clinical situations to develop the skills, knowledge, values and experience required to become a competent occupational therapist. This can be challenging to start with, but practice learning is one of the most interesting and exciting aspects of learning to be an occupational therapist.

You’ll complete over 1000 hours of placement; meeting the Royal College of Occupational Therapists (2008) and the World Federation of Occupational Therapists (WFOT, 2002) requirements. The placements are full-time and are integrated into the curriculum in four blocks (the first placement is six weeks, the second is seven weeks, and the third and fourth placements are ten weeks in length). Over these four placements the practice placement facilitators on the programmes aim to provide you with the range of experience as outlined by WFOT (2002). You’ll get experience working with people of different ages, acute and long standing health needs (including physical, mental health and learning disability) and services in a range of settings (hospital and community, urban and rural).

Practice settings

At LSBU, we work closely with a number of healthcare organisations to provide a wide range of suitable practice placements so that by the end of the course, you’ll have experienced wide-ranging healthcare provision that’s suitable for the chosen programme. These placements take place across a variety of clinical settings such as NHS acute Trusts, community placements and the independent sector. You’ll go on placements within the Greater London area in the NHS, local authority, voluntary, social enterprise and private sectors. Placements can be in existing services as well as emerging services.

Structure of placements

The four practice placements within the professional pre-registration courses, which total 33 weeks full time study, allow students to achieve the minimum 1000 hours required for their professional qualification. The student learning on placement is designed to be cumulative across the four placements:

Occupational Therapy Practice Placement 1

This is the first practice placement and will foster an overall appreciation of occupational perspectives of health and wellbeing, and the occupational therapy process. This placement provides an opportunity to observe and engage with occupational therapy practice. You'll also be encouraged to reflect on the impact of different aspects of the environment on occupational performance.

Occupational Therapy Practice Placement 2

This placement will support you to begin developing skills in implementing person centred, occupation focused occupational therapy practice. This is facilitated through the provision of guidelines and policies that govern practice.

Occupational Therapy Practice Placement 3

Building on the learning outcomes from practice placements 1 and 2, there is an increasing emphasis of developing depth of understanding of and increasing competence in the application of the occupational therapy process during this third practice placement.

Occupational Therapy Practice Placement 4

This final placement prepares you to be competent to practice, by providing the opportunity to make the transition from student to independent practitioner in occupational therapy and facilitating you to meet the HCPC standards of proficiency (HCPC, 2013), COT (2014) graduate competencies and COT (2015) Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct. This placement will require you to demonstrate competence in implementing the occupational therapy process with a limited caseload.

Support on placements

While you’re on a placement you’re allocated a named Practice Educator who will facilitate your learning. At least once during each placement, our staff will contact you and the Practice Educator to make sure all procedures and support mechanisms are in place and working productively for your learning and achievement.

Location

Practice learning opportunities will be arranged in a geographical location within the M25 area for all London sponsored or self-funding students. Where an approved opportunity has arisen, students have been able to complete one placement, placement 2 or placement 3, abroad. However, this is limited as a scrutiny process has to be undertaken to ensure the compatibility of the placement with the programme and eligibility for HCPC registration.

Facilities

Occupational Therapy Laboratories

We have three Occupational Therapy Laboratories, including an Art and Music skills laboratory, Splinting laboratory and Assisted Daily Living (ADL) laboratory. You will carry out a range of activities to practice your skills including using art, music and role play as intervention. You will practice making hand splints using thermoplastic materials as well as anatomy practicals using anatomy models. The simulated kitchen, bathrooms and bedroom spaces are used to practice patient transfers, wheel chair manoeuvering and planning activities for intervention using activities from daily life. You also practice using a wide range of standardised assessment tools such as: assistive devices for dressing, kitchen work and mobility.

The laboratories enable you to practice problem identification, intervention planning, implementation, communication skills, risk assessments, problem solving skills and group work skills; all to learn how best to work with the patient.

Teaching and learning

A range of assessment methods are used within this programme – including essays, presentations, critical evaluations and appraisal of research, exams, professional development profiles, reports and placement competencies.

Personal and professional tutoring

As a Health and Social Care student, you will be allocated a named tutor during your first three weeks at LSBU.  The role of your tutor is to be your primary contact for academic and professional development support.

Your tutor will support you to get the most of your time at LSBU, providing advice and signposting to other sources of support in the University. They should be the first person at the university that you speak to if you are having any difficulties that are affecting your work. These could be academic, financial, health-related or another type of problem.

You will have appointments with your tutor regularly throughout your course.  This will include an introductory meeting in your first semester and placement visits and calls.  You can contact your tutor for additional support by email or phone.

Staff

Entry requirements

  • A Level BBB or;
  • BTEC National Diploma DDM or;
  • Access to HE qualifications in Health and Social Care or similar with 30 Distinctions and 15 Merits or;
  • Equivalent level 3 qualifications worth 128 UCAS points
  • Applicants must hold 5 GCSEs A-C including Maths and English or equivalent (reformed GCSEs grade 4 or above).

English language

If your first language is not English you must have the following minimum International English Language Test Score (IELTS) results at the time of applying:

  • 7.0 overall or equivalent
  • 7.0 in the listening and reading sections
  • 7.0 in the writing and speaking sections.

Interview

If your initial application to a Health and Social Care course is successful, you’ll be invited for an interview.

Visit our interview page for information on preparing for the day and what to bring.

Foundation Year

Been out of study for a long time? Or maybe you haven’t met the entry requirements of your chosen degree? Our entry year acts as a bridge to degree-level studies.

How to apply

2020 entry

Instructions for Home/EU applicants
Mode Duration Start date Application code Application method
Mode
Full-time
Duration
3 years
Start date
September
Application code
B930
Application method
Mode
Part-time
Duration
4 years
Start date
September
Application code
2386
Application method

Please send your application through the Universities and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) using our institution code L75. UCAS is the organisation responsible for managing applications to higher education courses in the UK.

See our How to apply page for further details.

Personal statement

See our top tips for writing your personal statement.

Results

If you are unsuccessful in your application to LSBU for this year you cannot apply through UCAS Extra or Clearing. However you can apply for the following year.  It is important that you read the comments in the results statement so that you are prepared for any other interviews you may have.

Accommodation

Once we have made you an offer, you can apply for accommodation. You can rent from LSBU and you’ll deal directly with the university, not third party providers. That means we can guarantee you options to suit all budgets, with clear tenancy agreements and all-inclusive rents that include insurance for your personal belongings, internet access in each bedroom and on-site laundry facilities.

Or, if you’d rather rent privately, we can give you a list of landlords – just ask our Accommodation Service.

Read more about applying for accommodation at LSBU.

Finance

You don't need to wait for a confirmed place on a course to start applying for student finance. Read how to pay your fees as an undergraduate student.

Prepare to start

Disclosure Barring Service (DBS)

All pre-registration students need to be DBS cleared before going on placement. You’ll need to have an enhanced DBS check even if you have had one before and will not be able to go on placement until this is complete.

The DBS process is not difficult but can take some time so it's best to get started as soon as you receive your email.

DBS update service

If you're part of the DBS update service, your subscription is up to date and you already have a DBS certificate, please email a copy to hscdbsoh@lsbu.ac.uk and then bring in your hard copy for the document check. To take advantage of the update service, your certificate needs to be classified as 'Enhanced' and workforce must be listed as 'Adult and Child'. If you have any queries, please email us at hscdbsoh@lsbu.ac.uk.

How to complete your DBS

Our DBS supplier, Verifile, will send you an email with all the details you need to complete your DBS.

Verifile will give you instructions to log into their system and complete your personal details and information. To complete the process, you'll need your passport or driving licence and 5-year address history including dates when you moved in/out.

You can use your application number to track the progress of your DBS.

When you've finished, your Disclosure Statement will be mailed to the most recent address in your submission, so please make sure it's correct. We don't automatically receive a copy of this Statement, which is why we need you to bring it in as part of the next step.

Frequently asked questions

My Social Work friends said they need to pay. Do I need to pay?

What do I need to declare on my DBS?

I’ve applied for/had a DBS in past. Do I need to do it again?

Why do I need an enhanced DBS check?

Who reviews my DBS?

When will I hear back from the panel about my DBS?

Which address do I use?

I’ve lost my statement. What do I do?

I’ve had my application rejected due to my DBS declaration/disclosure. Can I appeal the decision?

Document check

Once you have completed the online part of the DBS process, you'll need to bring your DSB Statement along with three accepted documents from this list to be verified at either our Southwark or Havering campus. Document checks can be completed for free at either campus, no appointment is necessary.

If you cannot get to either of our campuses, you can have your documents checked and certified at the Post Office for a small fee.

Document check on campus

Document check at the Post Office

Enrolment and Welcome Week

Before you start your course we’ll send you information on what you’ll need to do before you arrive and during your first few days on campus. You can read about the process on our new students pages.

Occupational Health (OH)

An exciting part of many of our Health and Social Care courses is the opportunity to learn off-campus and work with patients, clients and/or service users. Before you start, we need to make sure that you have the correct levels of immunisations.

Questionnaire

The first part of your occupational health check is to complete the online questionnaire which our occupational health provider will review.

Complete your online questionnaire

GP appointment

The second part of your occupational health check is to get any inoculations that you may need from your GP. When attending your GP appointment, please take printed copies of these two documents with you.

Vaccination Screening Advisory Letter
GP Vaccination and Screening History

Occupational Health appointment

After these steps are complete you will receive an email from OHWorks Ltd inviting you to attend an appointment on-campus with an Occupational Health Nurse. These appointments take place during the week and sometimes when your classes have already started.

The OH team have prepared this guide which outlines what to expect at each stage. If you have queries or concerns about your Occupational Health clearance or inoculations please contact the Occupational Health team.

Frequently asked questions

I don't want to get vaccinations. Can I opt out of these?

My local GP doesn’t have my vaccination history. What should I do?

What if I can’t make my OH appointment?

I’ve already registered with LSBU’s Disability and Dyslexia Support Unit (DDS). Do I still need to tell the OH Nurse about my condition?

If I’ve declared a condition to the OH Nurse, do I need to register with LSBU’s Disability and Dyslexia Support Unit as well?

Holidays

Your holiday periods will not follow the normal University timetable because of placements. You’ll receive more details once you start your course.

Practice placements

Most health and social care courses’ practice placements will operate outside normal working hours e.g. evenings, nights, weekends and bank holidays.

Uniforms

Most placements and some practical sessions in our skills laboratories will require you to wear a uniform and name badge. You will be measured for uniforms specific to your course as part of your Welcome Week activities after enrolment. In the meantime, we have prepared answers to frequently asked questions that you might find useful.

Frequently asked questions

Do I get a uniform for when I go on placement?

Which uniforms will I receive?

How long do the uniforms need to last?

How do I know what size I am?

Am I able to request a longer tunic?

Can I use a preferred name or a nickname on my name badge?

What do I do if I lose or damage my name badge?

Can I order more uniforms?

Can I try on my uniforms?

What do I do with my uniform after I complete my studies?

Fees and funding

Fees are shown for new entrants to courses, for each individual year of a course, together with the total fee for all the years of a course. Continuing LSBU students should refer to the Finance section of our student portal, MyLSBU. Queries regarding fees should be directed to the Fees and Bursaries Team on: +44 (0)20 7815 6181.

Full-time

Part-time

Year1FTSouthwarkSEPT

The fee shown is for entry 2019/20.
UK/EU fee: £9250International fee: £17155
AOS/LSBU code: 3769Session code: 1FS00
Total course fee:
UK/EU £27750
International £51465

Year1PTDERSouthwarkSEPT

The fee shown is for entry 2019/20.
UK/EU fee: £6935International fee: £11483.33
AOS/LSBU code: 2386Session code: 1PS00
Total course fee:
UK/EU £26203.34
International £41340

For more information, including how and when to pay, see our fees and funding section for undergraduate students.

Please check your fee status and whether you are considered a Home, EU or International student for fee-paying purposes and for our regulatory returns, by reading the UKCISA regulations.

See our Tuition Fees Regulations (PDF File 143 KB) and Refund Policy (PDF File 102 KB).

Possible fee changes

The University reserves the right to increase its fees in line with changes to legislation, regulation and any government guidance or decisions.

The fees for international students are reviewed annually and the University reserves the right to increase the tuition fees in line with the RPIX measure of inflation up to 4 per cent.

Scholarships

We offer several types of fee reduction through our scholarships and bursaries. Find the full list and other useful information on our scholarships page.

KIS Data

Full-time

Part-time