BSc (Hons) Criminology (Black Studies) 2022/23

Southwark Campus

Mode: Full-time

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Tel: 0207 815 7500

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Overview

What factors can explain the recent rise in knife crime? How is climate change linked to crimes of the powerful? Are prisons the appropriate response to criminal acts? Are we all treated equally before the law?

These are some of the debates that you will explore in this course, by looking at the complex interactions between the state, the offender, the victim and society. You will think critically about how laws are made and how social structures shape both crime and crime control.

As a criminology student at LSBU, you will be able to engage in a series of employability events. Criminology courses open pathways to careers in a variety of settings, including probation, policing, the prison service, NGOs, local authorities, the voluntary sector, youth offending teams, teaching, social work and administration.

The course is also linked to the LSBU Crime and Justice Research Group that organizes a series of research seminars and public events throughout the year. You will be encouraged to attend and participate in these events to enhance your learning experience and meet with researchers, practitioners and campaigners. You'll also be taught by research-active academics whose work is nationally and internationally recognised and informs the course curriculum.

In year two you will be introduced to the history of empire and some of its social, political and economic legacies. This will provide the foundational knowledge needed in order to understand the power dynamics of racial inequalities in the present. In year three you will consider in detail the ways in which Black communities have responded to racial inequalities which have arisen as a result of the history of slavery and empire. In-depth theories relating to the construction of race will also be explored providing you a theoretical foundation for exploring how identities are formed, lived and expressed.

Why Criminology (Black Studies) at LSBU?

Ranked 2nd overall for Criminology in London (Sunday Times League Tables 2020).
Ranked 2nd in London for graduate prospects (Sunday Times League Table 2020).
Taught by research-active academics whose work is nationally and internationally recognised.
Link with the LSBU Crime and Justice Research Group, which organises a series of research seminars and public events throughout the year where you can meet with researchers, practitioners and campaigners.
Enhance your employability by taking part in our employability events and choosing a work placement module in Year 2.
Be part of an academic community dedicated to social justice and global responsibility - with inspiring schedule of guest speakers, events, volunteering opportunities and exchange of ideas.
Key course information - ordered by mode
Mode Duration Start date Location
Mode
Full-time
Duration
3 years
Start Date
September
Location
Southwark Campus

Modules

This course provides you with valuable knowledge and the ability to think critically about a range of topics within criminology. You will also gain transferable skills, which will provide you with a solid background to starting your career in different fields. Topics you will study include criminal justice, prisons, policing, punishment, youth crime and hate crime.

Year 1

Semester 1

  • Introduction to the criminal justice system
    This module introduces students to the different levels, agencies and operation of the criminal justice system. It presents the main institutions and provides an overview of the procedures and policies related to the contemporary criminal justice system and punishment of offenders. The module introduces a number of key issues and debates in relation to the effectiveness of the criminal justice system.
  • Deconstructing the crime problem
    What is considered a crime? How and to what extent is the crime problem dispersed throughout contemporary society? What do we know about current levels of crime in the UK and how do these compare historically?  These are some of the key questions addressed in this module which aims to introduce students to the basic anatomy of the crime problem. In addition to addressing specific questions concerning trends in different types of crime and social distribution of crime across society, its main aim is to encourage students to think about these issues in terms of broader social trends and relations.
  • Social Sciences in the Contemporary World
    This module provides students with a grounding in key issues in contemporary society, with a particular emphasis on the societal effects of globalization. These effects are dynamic and global in nature and impact on the key themes addressed in the module. These include: migration and 'race', gender, class, the changing nature of citizenship, sexualities, religion and the mass media. An important focus throughout the module is on how inequalities are reinforced but may be challenged via active citizenship and civic engagement around social justice issues.

Semester 2

  • Issues in Crime
    This module presents students with a range of distinct contemporary criminological issues and debates. It includes a range of topics and examines how fears and concerns about crime and the criminal justice system are related to issues such as governance, social exclusion and racial inequality. The module also enables students to explore varying explanations of crimes and crime control strategies.
  • Understanding crime: criminological theory in context
    In this module students will learn about the key underlying theories that shape criminology and how society thinks about crime.  We will examine the conceptual and practical differences between these schools and show how their differences have resulted in very different definitions of crime, types of research and governmental policy. We will also see how these different theories have shaped the criminal justice system of different societies. We will do all this within the broad historical context of the development of criminology.
  • Social Justice in Action
    This module develops students’ understanding of the concept of social justice (as a goal and a process) and its wider implications. The module also encourages students to focus on their interests, motivations, skills and abilities in employability terms and make connections between their studies and their future careers. Central to the module is a career and networking event. This event will provide students with the opportunity to meet and speak with individuals working in organisations concerned with social justice, particularly individuals who have themselves overcome challenges relating to their gender, race, class, age, sexuality, religion etc. Front line staff such as police officers, probation officers, social workers; activists, campaign work, researchers to voluntary sector representatives will be involved. Alumni will also contribute to the event.

Year 2

Semester 1

  • Understanding Punishment: Penal Theory and Practice
    This module examines penal theory and practice in a theoretical, comparative and historical way, and engages critically with the theoretical justifications and policy proposals for punishment. The module presents the juridical perspectives and rationales of punishment, historical and sociological explanations of punishment. The course also reflects on the race, class and gender bias in the penal system and critically discusses the concept of ‘crisis’ of the penal system as well as the issue of the privatisation of punishment.
  • Social Research Methods
    This module introduces students to key concepts, methods and techniques used in social research. Students learn how to evaluate the methodological choices of researchers and to conduct their own social research. Students are introduced to both qualitative methods in the first half and quantitative methods in the second half. Within each half the module focuses on evaluative criteria (e.g. ethics and measurement validity) for social research, data collection methods (e.g. qualitative interviews and surveys) and data analytic methods (e.g. grounded theory and statistical methods).
  • Decolonisation and Legacies of the British Empire
    The contested legacies of the British empire shape both Britain and the spaces it formerly colonised. This module allows students to explore the social, cultural, political and economic impact of British imperialism across a range of geographies, as well as their interconnectedness past and present. Post-colonial theory will serve as a basis for understanding how the history of colonialism has shaped ideas about race and nation, and material realities in the colonies and the metropole. Students will consider the impact of empire on the colonised communities that lived through and with it, including the issues relating to religious and ethnic identities, the division of land and the establishment of new nations. Students will also consider how the experience of empire has shaped the politics of whiteness in the present.

    Semester 2

    • Youth, Crime and Delinquency  
      This module provides an overview of the development of youth crime as a specific area of criminological inquiry and a distinct jurisdiction within the criminal justice system. The Module considers the development of ‘delinquency’ as a specific field of intervention and investigation. It gives particular attention to the evolution of youth justice policies and examines current literature in relation to the strengths and limitations of the contemporary youth justice system.
    • Working in the Social Sciences
      This module provides an opportunity for students to work in settings related to their studies and, more generally, gain meaningful workplace experience in which to apply their social scientific learning. It will also reinforce their studies through the application and integration of relevant workplace experience into the academic context. Voluntary and community sector organisations, charities, academic research and most political organisations are particularly suitable for work placements, although much can also be learned from placements in commercial settings. Students who do not secure a formal external placement will form groups to work on an applied project related to LSBUs 9 identified UN Sustainable Development Goals.

    Optional modules

    • Environment Justice, Sustainability and Climate Crisis 
      This module addresses the social and political dimensions of ecology. It examines defining features of the concept of (environmental) sustainability, introducing various political perspectives. We will see how local and global environmental risks demand new forms of urban, national and international governmentality. The module will discuss how societies affect and are affected by changes in the natural environment. Finally, we will engage with how climate change impacts on our understanding of time, including how we imagine the end of the world. Throughout the module, we will research and look at the activities of organisations and movements involved in environmental sustainability.
    • London: Crime and Social Exclusion
      This module uses London as a case study for a discussion of the cultural, social, and spatial effects of crime and social exclusion. Using both historical and contemporary examples the course will discuss the following themes: poverty & crime, spatial stigma, race & policing, gender, sexuality & crime, security and urban design, the city at night, cultural representations of criminal London. Through these themes the course will explore how social difference and criminalisation interact to produce the city. Students will develop the capacity to relate debates surrounding crime and criminology to the spatial & social politics of urban space.
    • Policing and Society
      This module will seek to create a critical understanding of historical, social and contemporary problems and debates in the development of modern policing, with specific reference to England and Wales.  Within this framework a range of theoretical and practical topics will be addressed, including, legitimacy, accountability and representation, in relation to significant policies and programs. An analysis of police culture and ideology, in the context of human rights, democracy, and governance, will be undertaken as part of this. Also discussed will be the impact upon police strategies and practices of globalisation, consumerism, politicisation, and the New Public Management.

    Year 3

    Semester 1

    • Research project (double module running across two semesters 40 credits)
      This level six double module covers two semesters and consists of the research for and completion of an academic project with a 9000-word limit. Each student chooses a subject relevant to the study of Sociology or Criminology in which they wish to specialize, and then uses the skills and knowledge that they have accumulated and developed through modules studied at previous levels to undertake and complete the project. During the whole process, from a choice of subject to final submission, each student will have the support and guidance of a supervisor allocated for this purpose.
    • Gender, crime and justice
      The relationship between men, masculinity and crime; and women, femininity and crime has assumed increasing visibility and political significance within both criminology and the public arena. An understanding of both masculinities and femininities is central to this module. Drawing on feminist perspectives in criminological theory as well as more mainstream theoretical accounts, this module evaluates the evidence, which indicates that patterns of offending, victimisation and the workings of the main criminal justice agencies are gendered. The module also transgresses traditional debates in this area by considering a human rights perspective for the study of gender and crime.
    • Black Political Thought and Activism

    This module explores the Black political thought and the ways in which it has shaped different forms of activism over time. You’ll critically examine concepts relating to the construction of race including theories of ‘political blackness’, the ‘Black Atlantic’, ‘Pan-Africanism’, ‘intersectionality’ and ‘decolonisation’. You will explore key areas of political campaigning including antislavery, decolonisation, civil rights, education, criminal justice and Black Lives Matter. Films, documentaries, music and political speeches will be analysed. You’ll visit libraries and archives including the Black Cultural Archives.

      Semester 2

      • Research project (continued)
      • Contemporary criminology
        This module allows students to examine, in depth, contemporary and specific areas of criminological debate and theory. The module adopts a flexible design in response to current developments in the field of criminology and in the context of current social and political problems. Students will be encouraged to critically explore topics within the area and apply them to wider criminological debate and theory.
      • Race, Culture and Identity
        This module addresses the centrality of race and ethnicity (including whiteness) to social relations. It provides an analysis of race and ethnicity within a changing scholarship and within their historical, cultural, political and theoretical contexts. Theoretical understandings of the intersectionality of race, gender and sexuality will also be explored, highlighting their impact on all aspects of people’s lives. The complexities of analysing race, gender and sexuality are applied to representations in cultural forms, such as media and film. The module also demonstrates how the concepts covered have been influential in shaping public policy.

          Employability

          Career opportunities

          Our students volunteer and find jobs in a range of setting, including the police service, the prison service, legal advice, victim support, domestic violence and child abuse agencies and charities, youth offending and youth mentoring schemes.

          A social science degree also has the real advantage of opening up careers in a number of professions such as teaching, social work, administration and higher level education. Other graduates have forged exciting careers in research, public relations, advertising, retail, management and media-related work.

          Career roles

          One popular role is as a probation officer working with offenders before, during and after they are sentenced. Possessing a great deal of patience, strong oral communication skills and a non-judgemental attitude, working in probation can be very rewarding work. A qualified probation officer can earn between £28,000-£35,000. (National Careers Service)

          The police service also offers a wide variety of long-term opportunities providing a two-year probationary period is completed. Salaries after 5 years can be up to £30,000. (BBC News)

          There are a number of career opportunities within the criminal justice system or agencies and charities working with victims of crime, ex-offenders, and witnesses.

          Employability Service

          At LSBU, we want to set you up for a successful career. During your studies – and for two years after you graduate – you’ll have access to our Employability Service, which includes:

          • An online board where you can see a wide range of placements: part-time, full-time or voluntary. You can also drop in to see our Job Shop advisers, who are always available to help you take the next step in your search.
          • Our Careers Gym offering group workshops on CVs, interview techniques and finding work experience, as well as regular presentations from employers across a range of sectors.

          Our Student Enterprise team can also help you start your own business and develop valuable entrepreneurial skills.

          Optional Work Placement

          Students will complete a work-based learning module as part of their second year where they will complete an optional work placement or take part in other forms of work-based learning. In the past, our students have volunteered with charities and criminal justice agencies, with local authorities, on programmes ranging from rehabilitation of offenders to victim support and campaigner groups. Through these, students contribute to real world situations linked to their subject of interest. In many cases, students maintain a relationship with the organisation they volunteer for. Placements ground a student's experience, provide confidence and bolster a CV immeasurably.

          Our students have taken up work placements at:

          • Chance UK – a unique early intervention mentoring organisation who provide adult volunteer mentors to work with children aged 5-11 years at risk of developing anti-social behaviour in later life.
          • Kairos in Soho – a pan-London LGBT Community Development Organisation.
          • The Naz project London – a sexual health organisation that works to mobilise Black and Minority Ethnic (BME) communities in relation to HIV and other sexual health concerns.
          • Richmond Advice and Information on Disability (RAID)
          • Women's Royal Voluntary Service (WRVS)

          Teaching and learning

          Study hours

          Year 1 class contact time is typically 9 hours per week plus individual tutorial and independent study.

          Brief assessment outline

          All modules are assessed by a combination of coursework, essays, exams, presentations, reports, case-studies, reviews and final year dissertation.

          Research active academics

          You will be taught by research-active academics whose work is internationally recognised and informs the course curriculum. You'll be encouraged to attend and participate in the research seminars and events organized by the Crime and Justice Research Group, that will strengthen your learning experience as well as your network.

          Percentage of time spent in different learning activities
          Lectures and seminars Self-directed study
          Year 1 23% 77%
          Year 2 23% 77%
          Year 3 18% 82%

          Criminology conference and events at LSBU

          At LSBU,Criminology staff are actively engaged in research and organize research events, conferences and seminars at LSBU and other universities throughout the year. The Crime and Justice Research Group organizes a monthly research seminar and at least two larger events open to the public. Over the past two years we have welcomed Prof. Alex Vitale from New York as a visiting professor, held a public event with Prof. Alex Vitale and Gary Younge, as well as two round table events focusing on Youth and (In)justice and more recently on Policing dissent.

          Entry requirements

          • A Level BCC or:
          • BTEC National Diploma MMM or:
          • Access to HE qualifications with 9 Distinctions and 36 Merits or:
          • Equivalent Level 3 qualifications worth 106 UCAS points
          • Applicants must hold 5 GCSEs A-C including Maths and English, or equivalent (reformed GCSEs grade 4 or above).

          We welcome qualifications from around the world. English language qualifications for international students: IELTS score of 6.0, Cambridge Proficiency or Advanced Grade C.

          Advanced entry

          If you have already completed some studies at another university, we may be able to consider you for advanced entry. Please see our advanced entry page for more information.

          Course status

          • Accreditations and course subject to validation

            This course is validated by London South Bank University. Applications are being accepted.

          How to apply

          International students

          International (non Home/EU) applicants should follow our international how to apply guide.

          Home/EU applicants

          Mode Duration Start date Application code Application method
          Mode
          Full-time
          Duration
          3 years
          Start date
          September
          Application code
          M930
          Application method

          Accommodation

          Once we have made you an offer, you can apply for accommodation. You can rent from LSBU and you’ll deal directly with the university, not third party providers. That means we can guarantee you options to suit all budgets, with clear tenancy agreements and all-inclusive rents that include insurance for your personal belongings, internet access in each bedroom and on-site laundry facilities.

          Or, if you’d rather rent privately, we can give you a list of landlords – just ask our Accommodation Service.

          Read more about applying for accommodation at LSBU.

          Finance

          You don't need to wait for a confirmed place on a course to start applying for student finance. Read how to pay your fees as an undergraduate student.

          Home/EU postgraduate students and research students should apply through our dedicated application system.

          Full details of how to do this are supplied on our How to apply section for postgraduate students and our How to apply section for research students.

          International applicants should use our international application system. Full details can be found on our How to apply section for international students.

          See our admissions policy (PDF File 1,043 KB) and complaints policy (PDF File 127 KB).

          Considering your application

          Your application will be circulated to a number of potential supervisors who will look at your academic qualifications, experience and the research proposal to decide whether your research interest is something that could be supervised at LSBU.

          There will also be an interview either by telephone or at the University. If you are successful you will be offered a place on a course and informed of the next enrolment date. The whole process normally takes between six to eight weeks, from receipt of your application to a decision being made about your application at the School.

          Prepare to start

          Applicant events

          After you’ve received your offer we’ll send you emails about events we run to help you prepare for your course.

          Welcome Week

          Before you start your course we’ll send you information on what you’ll need to do before you arrive and during your first few days on campus. You can read about the process on our Welcome Week pages.

          Getting started

          Students can prepare themselves for the course by following the news - quality newspapers, good TV news bulletins, Radio 4 news etc - particularly news about crime (politics of crime as well as actual crime stories).

          Suggested reading

          It is valuable to do some preparatory reading before starting the course, we suggest:

          • Hayward, K., Maruna, S., and Mooney, J. (2009) Fifty Key Thinkers in Criminology, London: Routledge
          • Lippens, R.  (2009) A Very Short, Fairly Interesting and Reasonably Cheap Book about Studying Criminology. London: Sage.
          • Newburn, T. (2017) Criminology, third edition, London: Sage
          • Treadwell, J. (2013) Criminology: The Essentials, 2nd edition, London: Sage

          Prepare to start

          We help our students prepare for university even before the semester starts. To find out when you should apply for your LSBU accommodation or student finance read the How to apply tab for this course.

          Enrolment

          Before you start your course we’ll send you information on what you’ll need to do before you arrive and during your first few days on campus. You can read about the process on our Enrolment pages.

          Fees and funding

          For more information, including how and when to pay, see our fees and funding section for undergraduate students.

          Please check your fee status and whether you are considered a Home, EU or International student for fee-paying purposes and for our regulatory returns, by reading the UKCISA regulations.

          See our Tuition Fees Regulations (PDF File 201 KB) and Refund Policy (PDF File 775 KB).

          Possible fee changes

          The University reserves the right to increase its fees in line with changes to legislation, regulation and any government guidance or decisions.

          The fees for international students are reviewed annually and the University reserves the right to increase the tuition fees in line with the RPIX measure of inflation up to 4 per cent.

          Scholarships

          We offer several types of fee reduction through our scholarships and bursaries. Find the full list and other useful information on our scholarships page.

          The individual fee for this course is shown above. For more information, including how and when to pay, see our fees and funding section for postgraduate students.

          See our Tuition Fees Regulations (PDF File 201 KB) and Refund Policy (PDF File 775 KB).

          We have a range of PhD Scholarships available in partnership with businesses and organisations; read notices of PhD studentships.

          Register your interest in Criminology (Black Studies)

          Contact information

          Course Enquiries - UK

          Tel: 0207 815 7500

          Order a prospectus

          Course Enquiries - International

          Tel: +44 (0) 20 7815 6189

          Get in touch

          Live Chat

          Due to COVID-19, call waiting times may be longer than usual. Any questions? Use the green bubble on the bottom right hand corner to start a live chat with us

          Chat with a course student

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          Full-time

        • School of Law and Social Sciences