shrunken head in test environment

MSc Anthroengineering

Southwark Campus

Mode: Full-time

Apply now Register your interest Book an Open Day Order a prospectus

Contact information

Course Enquiries - UK

Tel: 0207 815 7500

Live Chat

Due to COVID-19, call waiting times may be longer than usual. Any questions? Use the green bubble on the bottom right hand corner to start a live chat with us

Course Enquiries - International

Tel: +44 (0) 20 7815 6189

Get in touch

Overview

Incorporating Cultures into Products

Are you intrigued to learn how cultures influence the design of products? This masters in Anthroengineering, which is one of the world’s first course of its kind, addresses generational challenges and demands of our daily lives which requires both technology and an understanding of humanity. Anthroengineering combines two specialist fields, engineering and the application of science in technology, and anthropology, the science of understanding humanity by studying, among other things, its biology and culture.

In an exclusive partnership with the Natural History Museum (NHM), you will have a unique learning experience with industry guest speakers in our seminar series. Through this, you will be introduced to real-world applications of anthroengineering, pointing you towards potential career paths after the completion of your masters’ degree.

Why Anthroengineering at LSBU?

Join the world’s first course in Anthroengineering, merging the fields of anthropology and engineering.
The course will be run in collaboration with the Natural History Museum, offering exciting lectures and dissertation supervision.
Located in the heart of London with culture on your doorstep.
Ranked 4th in London in Mechanical Engineering subject group (Guardian League Tables, 2022).
Ranked 1st for student experience and teaching quality in the UK (Sunday Times Good University Guide 2020).
Key course information - ordered by mode
Mode Duration Start date Location
Mode
Full-time
Duration
1 year
Start Date
September
Location
Southwark Campus

Modules

Modules are informed by applied research from within the department and from close links within industry and enterprise organisations.

There are two pathways being offered. Those with a background in engineering (or a similar field) take the Engineering Pathways. Those with a background in anthropology (or a similar field) are encouraged to take the Anthropology Pathway.

Engineering Pathway

  • Introduction to Anthropology and Biology
    This module provides primer information on (biological) anthropology and biology for those with a background in engineering or related disciplines. Topics covered in this module range from hominins and human evolution to biological variation and primatology. It will bridge archaic and topical concepts ranging from who are we and how did we get here? to race as a social construct.
  • Mechanical Modelling of Biological Systems I: Physical to Digital World
    This is the first of two modules on the mechanical modelling of biological systems. When constructing mechanical models, data must be acquired from the real-world and translated into the digital one. These data include geometry, boundary conditions, such as forces and motion, and mechanical properties. Here, students will be taught traditional and state-of-the-art methods related to the acquisition of this data, along with the underlying theories for these methods. By combining theory with hands-on experience, students will leave this module with the ability to gather and post-process data relevant to the creation of digital mechanical models.
  • Hard Tissue Biology and Mechanics
    Primates have an internal skeletal system that provides support and structure to the body. The teeth, responsible for food item breakdown and energy intake, are the only portion of the skeleton exposed to the external environment. Lacking self-repair mechanisms, dental enamel exhibits unique adaptation against mechanical failure. This module will cover the basics of hard tissue biology and physiology. The mechanics and mechanical adaptations of hard tissues will be investigated in the context of primate and hominin evolution.
  • Technical Research and Professional Skills
    This module teaches how to search and gather relevant technical information, how to extract the essence from a piece of technical literature, how to carry out a critical review of a research paper, how to write a feasibility report, how to give presentations and put your thoughts across effectively, and how to manage a project in terms of time and progress in a group project environment. These objectives are designed to enhance the technical and analytical background that is necessary for the respective Master’s stream.
  • Seminar Series
    In this module, we will invite experts who use theories and methods from both anthropology and engineering in their research and/or work to give talks on their areas of expertise. Students will be provided with a list of speakers at the beginning of the semester and are expected to research the speakers before the talk. Group discussions about the topic and its relevance to anthroengineering will occur after presentations.
  • Musculoskeletal Evolutionary Biomechanics
    This module focuses on the relationship between muscles, bones, and movement in the human body. It teaches students methods for capturing, processing, and interpreting motion capture and electromyography data. It discusses trade-offs between form and function, and how to biomechanical data in an evolutionary framework. Finally, it discusses how biomechanical studies can be used to reconstruct the lives of our ancestors, and how human biological variation effects biomechanical performance today. 
  • Mechanical Modelling of Biological Systems II: Digital Models, Validation, and Interpretation
    This is the second of two modules on the mechanical modelling of biological systems. This module focuses on the construction of biomechanical models of hard tissues using the data acquired using methods from mechanical modelling part I, the validation of these models, and interpretation of the results in both mechanically and biologically relevant manners. Two classes of models – finite element and musculoskeletal models (linking Musculoskeletal evolutionary biomechanics module with this one) – will be focused on for this module. Validation methods are introduced, discussed, and applied.
  • Design Anthropology
    This module will cover how human-centred design and ethnographic methods work together to understand the interactions between people and technology. This includes design ethnography: how to understand different users and specific cultural and social contexts using human-centred design methods. It will also include an introduction to observation and documentation methods such as visual (digital photography and video), user-centred and participatory design approaches
  • Project in Engineering
    This module requires MSc students to undertake a major project in an area that is relevant to their MSc course. Students choose their projects by contacting relevant research centre academics and engage on actively creating a project title and expected outcomes, carrying it out under the guidance of their supervisor. At the end of the project, the students are required to present a dissertation, which forms a major element of the assessment. The dissertation assesses the student’s ability to integrate information from various sources, to conduct an in-depth investigation, to critically analyse results and information obtained and to propose solutions. The other element of the assessment includes an oral examination (viva-voce). The Individual Project carries 60 credits and is a major part of MSc program.

Anthropology Pathway

  • Solid Mechanics and Materials
    This module will give you a broad introduction to the properties and limitations of engineering materials and an understanding of the fundamental structural characteristics governing these properties. The module will also introduce you to the fundamental concepts of engineering mechanics, particularly statics at BEng Level 4. The module will emphasise the relationship between theory and real engineering systems, and will involve a set of appropriate practical laboratory experiments.
  • Mechanical Modelling of Biological Systems I: Physical to Digital World
    This is the first of two modules on the mechanical modelling of biological systems. When constructing mechanical models, data must be acquired from the real-world and translated into the digital one. These data include geometry, boundary conditions, such as forces and motion, and mechanical properties. Here, students will be taught traditional and state-of-the-art methods related to the acquisition of this data, along with the underlying theories for these methods. By combining theory with hands-on experience, students will leave this module with the ability to gather and post-process data relevant to the creation of digital mechanical models.
  • Hard Tissue Biology and Mechanics
    Primates have an internal skeletal system that provides support and structure to the body. The teeth, responsible for food item breakdown and energy intake, are the only portion of the skeleton exposed to the external environment. Lacking self-repair mechanisms, dental enamel exhibits unique adaptation against mechanical failure. This module will cover the basics of hard tissue biology and physiology. The mechanics and mechanical adaptations of hard tissues will be investigated in the context of primate and hominin evolution.
  • Technical Research and Professional Skills
    This module teaches how to search and gather relevant technical information, how to extract the essence from a piece of technical literature, how to carry out a critical review of a research paper, how to write a feasibility report, how to give presentations and put your thoughts across effectively, and how to manage a project in terms of time and progress in a group project environment. These objectives are designed to enhance the technical and analytical background that is necessary for the respective Master’s stream.
  • Seminar Series
    In this module, we will invite experts who use theories and methods from both anthropology and engineering in their research and/or work to give talks on their areas of expertise. Students will be provided with a list of speakers at the beginning of the semester and are expected to research the speakers before the talk. Group discussions about the topic and its relevance to anthroengineering will occur after presentations.
  • Musculoskeletal Evolutionary Biomechanics
    This module focuses on the relationship between muscles, bones, and movement in the human body. It teaches students methods for capturing, processing, and interpreting motion capture and electromyography data. It discusses trade-offs between form and function, and how to biomechanical data in an evolutionary framework. Finally, it discusses how biomechanical studies can be used to reconstruct the lives of our ancestors, and how human biological variation effects biomechanical performance today. 
  • Mechanical Modelling of Biological Systems II: Digital Models, Validation, and Interpretation
    This is the second of two modules on the mechanical modelling of biological systems. This module focuses on the construction of biomechanical models of hard tissues using the data acquired using methods from mechanical modelling part I, the validation of these models, and interpretation of the results in both mechanically and biologically relevant manners. Two classes of models – finite element and musculoskeletal models (linking Musculoskeletal evolutionary biomechanics module with this one) – will be focused on for this module. Validation methods are introduced, discussed, and applied.
  • Design Anthropology
    This module will cover how human-centred design and ethnographic methods work together to understand the interactions between people and technology. This includes design ethnography: how to understand different users and specific cultural and social contexts using human-centred design methods. It will also include an introduction to observation and documentation methods such as visual (digital photography and video), user-centred and participatory design approaches
  • Project in Engineering
    This module requires MSc students to undertake a major project in an area that is relevant to their MSc course. Students choose their projects by contacting relevant research centre academics and engage on actively creating a project title and expected outcomes, carrying it out under the guidance of their supervisor. At the end of the project, the students are required to present a dissertation, which forms a major element of the assessment. The dissertation assesses the student’s ability to integrate information from various sources, to conduct an in-depth investigation, to critically analyse results and information obtained and to propose solutions. The other element of the assessment includes an oral examination (viva-voce). The Individual Project carries 60 credits and is a major part of MSc program.

Employability

Employability Service

At LSBU, we want to set you up for a successful career. During your studies – and for two years after you graduate – you’ll have access to our Employability Service, which includes:

  • An online board where you can see a wide range of placements: part-time, full-time or voluntary. You can also drop in to see our Job Shop advisers, who are always available to help you take the next step in your search.
  • Our Careers Gym offering group workshops on CVs, interview techniques and finding work experience, as well as regular presentations from employers across a range of sectors.

Our Student Enterprise team can also help you start your own business and develop valuable entrepreneurial skills.

Facilities

Read more about our workshops, laboratories and industry-standard software packages.

Teaching and learning

This MSc includes lectures, guest lectures from other academics and industries, seminars, practical laboratory experiments, practical application of taught methods, tutorials, practical workshop classes, practical laboratory experiments, and field trips.

You will learn both individually and in groups. Each module is delivered through a combination of lectures, tutorials, practical workshops, etc. all of which amounts to directed teaching (classroom contact). There is a variance in the makeup of the number of hours dedicated to lectures, workshops, etc. but the total number of study hours attached to each module is dependent on the module weighting in credits. Typically, a 20-credit module is attached to 200 hours of learning which constitutes both directed learning and independent learning (1 credit is equal to 10 hours). This is split between contact time and independent learning. Generally, this equates to a maximum of 78 hours of contact time per module, and a minimum of 122 hours of independent learning time.

Entry requirements

In order to be considered for entry to the course, applicants will be required to have the following qualifications:

  • A degree equivalent to UK Honours degree (minimum 2nd class) in Mechanical Engineering, Anthropology, or related disciplines (e.g., electrical engineering, physics, general biology)

or

  • Professional qualifications (e.g., CENG) along with several years of relevant industrial experience. The relevant industrial experience is to be assessed by the Course Director. Relevant industrial experience could include working in museums, constructing / analysing 3D engineering / mathematical models, and / or field work.

A minimum GCSE / Level 2 Functional Skills or equivalent in maths are recommended. If you have concerns about your mathematical abilities, please email the course director.

Accreditation of Prior Learning / Accreditation of Prior Experiential Learning (APL / APEL) will not be allowed on the course.

Overseas applicants are encouraged to apply. They are required to have a minimum English language IELTS score of 6.5 with no less than 5.5 in any of the components.

How to apply

International students

International (non Home/EU) applicants should follow our international how to apply guide.

Home/EU applicants

Mode Duration Start date Application code Application method
Mode
Full-time
Duration
1 year
Start date
September
Application code
5787
Application method

Postgraduate students and research students should apply through our dedicated application system. Full details of how to do this are supplied on our How to apply section for postgraduate students and our How to apply section for research students.

See our admissions policy (PDF File 1,043 KB) and complaints policy (PDF File 127 KB).

Accommodation

Students should apply for accommodation at London South Bank University (LSBU) as soon as possible, once we have made an offer of a place on one of our academic courses. Read more about applying for accommodation at LSBU.

Finance

It's a good idea to think about how you'll pay university tuition and maintenance costs while you're still applying for a place to study. Remember – you don't need to wait for a confirmed place on a course to start applying for student finance. Read how to pay your fees as a postgraduate student.

Postgraduate Application Service

Book a session with one of our specialist Postgraduate Advisors. Over a one on one Advice Session they'll advise you on postgraduate degrees at LSBU that match your interests and experience.

Home/EU postgraduate students and research students should apply through our dedicated application system.

Full details of how to do this are supplied on our How to apply section for postgraduate students and our How to apply section for research students.

International applicants should use our international application system. Full details can be found on our How to apply section for international students.

See our admissions policy (PDF File 1,043 KB) and complaints policy (PDF File 127 KB).

Considering your application

Your application will be circulated to a number of potential supervisors who will look at your academic qualifications, experience and the research proposal to decide whether your research interest is something that could be supervised at LSBU.

There will also be an interview either by telephone or at the University. If you are successful you will be offered a place on a course and informed of the next enrolment date. The whole process normally takes between six to eight weeks, from receipt of your application to a decision being made about your application at the School.

Prepare to start

We help our students prepare for university even before the semester starts. To find out when you should apply for your LSBU accommodation or student finance read the How to apply tab for this course.

Enrolment

Before you start your course we’ll send you information on what you’ll need to do before you arrive and during your first few days on campus. You can read about the process on our Enrolment pages.

Prepare to start

We help our students prepare for university even before the semester starts. To find out when you should apply for your LSBU accommodation or student finance read the How to apply tab for this course.

Enrolment

Before you start your course we’ll send you information on what you’ll need to do before you arrive and during your first few days on campus. You can read about the process on our Enrolment pages.

Fees and funding

Fees are shown for new entrants to courses, for each individual year of a course, together with the total fee for all the years of a course. Continuing LSBU students should refer to the Finance section of our student portal, MyLSBU. Queries regarding fees should be directed to the Fees and Bursaries Team on: +44 (0)20 7815 6181.

Full-time

MSc Anthroengineering (FT) - Year 1 FT Southwark SEPT

The fee shown is for entry 2021/22
UK fee: £11100International fee: £16800
AOS/LSBU code: 5787Session code: 1FS00

This course is recruiting for September 2022; the fee that is quoted is for September 2022.

For more information, including how and when to pay, see our fees and funding section for postgraduate students.

See our Tuition Fees Regulations (PDF File 201 KB) and Refund Policy (PDF File 775 KB).

Possible fee changes

The University reserves the right to increase its fees in line with changes to legislation, regulation and any government guidance or decisions.

The fees for international students are reviewed annually and the University reserves the right to increase the tuition fees in line with the RPIX measure of inflation up to 4 per cent.

Postgraduate loan (PGL) for Masters study

If you are starting a Masters course, studying either full- or part-time, you may be entitled to apply for a postgraduate study loan. Find out more at our postgraduate fees and funding section.

Scholarships

We offer several types of fee reduction through our scholarships and bursaries. Find the full list and other useful information on funding your studies on the scholarships and fee discounts page.

Fee status

Please check your fee status and whether you are considered a Home, EU or International student for fee-paying purposes and for our regulatory returns, by reading the UKCISA regulations.

The individual fee for this course is shown above. For more information, including how and when to pay, see our fees and funding section for postgraduate students.

See our Tuition Fees Regulations (PDF File 201 KB) and Refund Policy (PDF File 775 KB).

We have a range of PhD Scholarships available in partnership with businesses and organisations; read notices of PhD studentships.

Register your interest in Anthroengineering

Contact information

Course Enquiries - UK

Tel: 0207 815 7500

Order a prospectus

Course Enquiries - International

Tel: +44 (0) 20 7815 6189

Get in touch

Live Chat

Due to COVID-19, call waiting times may be longer than usual. Any questions? Use the green bubble on the bottom right hand corner to start a live chat with us

Chat with a course student

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