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International Relations with Sociology BA (Hons)

Unistats

What is Unistats?

Key Information Set (KIS) Data is only gathered for undergraduate full-time courses. There are a number of reasons why this course does not have KIS data associated with it. For example, it may be a franchise course run at a partner college or a course designed for continuing professional development.

Overview

Explore the processes of internationalisation/globalisation and their impact on policy, society and people. Appraise issues of equity, ethics, social justice and global responsibility. This is a combined degree that’s weighted 70-per-cent International Relations (IR) and 30-per-cent Sociology.

London South Bank University sociology student

6 reasons to study IR here

Taught by research-active academics: Lecturers share their wide ranging research interests: international relations, global political economy, international human rights, sexualities and society, global sport, human trafficking, sustainability and climate change.
Diverse student body: Our interactive seminars and workshops encourage free and open debate - for you to share ideas and learn from each other.
Global alumni network: Become part of an 80,000-strong alumni network.
Learning resources: You'll have access to a variety of helpful resources, including the Perry Library - indeed the University is the No.1 London Modern university for Learning Resources (National Student Survey 2016).
Work experience: Enhance your employability by taking part in our volunteering programme - and take advantage of optional 'work placement' module.
Global perspective: Be part of an academic community dedicated to social justice and global responsibility - with inspiring schedule of guest speakers, events, volunteering opportunities and exchange of ideas.

This degree course covers...

  • arguments, concepts, theoretical perspectives, evidence and texts in the field of IR
  • advanced social research skills
  • politics, decision making and democracy
  • globalisation and internationalisation
  • crimes against humanity - and crimes by the powerful
  • political activism and social movements
  • the application of IR and political concepts and theories to forge a more socially just and sustainable global future.
Key course information - ordered by mode
Mode Duration Start date Location
Mode
Part-time
Duration
5 years
Start Date
September
Location
Southwark Campus
Mode
Full-time
Duration
3 years
Start Date
September
Location
Southwark Campus

Modules

Year 1

  • Introduction to international relations
    This module introduces key issues in International Relations. We'll focus on major contemporary global events and processes and explore perspectives and concepts that inform international analysis.  The content will respond to real-world controversies and events for the year, such as climate change, humanitarian intervention, the Syrian conflict and the Olympic Games. Assessment: group presentation (30%), blog (30%) and foreign policy briefing paper (40%).
  • Revolutions, wars and the making of the modern world
    This module introduces some of the major themes and events in modern world history. It begins with an examination of the Enlightenment and the French Revolution. It moves on to look at the Industrial Revolution, national unification movements in Italy and Germany in the nineteenth century, Empire, the First World War and the ideologies of Fascism, Nazism and Soviet Communism. It looks at the impact of key historical figures such as Lenin, Stalin, Mussolini and Hitler and their impact on the shape of the modern world. Taught through: weekly lectures, seminars and group debates. Assessment: group work and presentation (40%) and 1,500-word essay (60%).
  • Issues in contemporary sociology
    Issues in Contemporary Society covers key concepts in sociology and addresses issues such as migration,  race, gender and class. The focus throughout the module is how inequalities are reinforced through the changing nature of citizenship, sexualities, religion and mass media.
  • Introduction to international relations theory
    This module introduces key perspectives in international relations theory, both classical and modern. We'll explore classical thinkers, including Hobbes, Kant and Marx, but our emphasis is on twentieth century International Relations’ thinking. The Realist tradition will be a central concern, but critiques and alternatives will also be analysed. Throughout the module, we'll apply IR theory to real-world developments such as: war and peace,  global justice,  human rights,  foreign policy and diplomacy, nationalism, and revolution. Assessment: logbook (20%), 1,500-word essay (50%) and 1-hr exam (30%).
  • War and social change in the 20th century
    This module introduces the major themes and events in twentieth century world history from the Second World War onward. It examines contemporary historical events that have impacted society, including the Cold War, decolonisation, Mao Zedong and the Chinese Communist revolution, the effect of New Right ideologies in the 1980's, the fall of the Soviet Union and its consequences, globalisation, as well as moves towards European integration and the development of the European Union. You'll analyse the impact of these key events on the shaping of the modern and contemporary world. Taught through: weekly lectures and seminars. Assessment 2,000-word essay (100%).
  • The sociological imagination
    You'll be introduced to some of the main questions raised about human societies.  The Module invites you to explore significant aspects of the origins and development of sociological inquiry within a historical context.  You'll be encouraged to read specifically selected pieces about key concepts and approaches to the study of social action in our societies.

Year 2

  • Global governance, regionalism and the nation state
    This module explores the contemporary multi-layered international system. We'll focus on the complex, dialectical (non-linear) economic, social and political relations between nation-states, regionalisation and globalisation. Regionalisation has emerged across the world, but is most developed in Europe. We'll also explore the role of international organisations in the global system, with particular emphasis on the United Nations system, including international financial institutions. In problematising one-sided arguments about the decline of the state, we'll critically reflect on state power and global inter-dependence in the 21st century. Assessment: international news diary (50%) and 2-hr exam (50%).
  • Social research skills 1
    In the first half of this module we'll introduce basic issues in research design and methodology.  Topics covered include: experimental design and random assignment, formulating research questions sampling and measurement.   In the second half of the module you'll learn the basics of statistical analysis and how to use SPSS.
  • The environment, sustainability and climate change
    This module provides a grounding in the study of the politics of environmental sustainability. The module focuses firstly on the debate on environmental sustainability which includes the challenge by environmentalists that it is a contradiction. Alternative approaches will also be examined including: green theory, the free market and Marxist approaches. The second part of the module looks at increasing global competition for water, food, energy and oil. The politics of climate change and deforestation; transport and tourism; global security and justice will also be covered. The third part of the course focuses on case studies of organisations and movements involved in environmental sustainability. We'll look into the IPCC; Copenhagen Climate Council; the Fair Trade Movement; Ethical Consumerism and the Environmental Movement.
  • Globalisation and development
    This module introduces key concepts, issues and theoretical debates in development studies. The module focuses on the developing societies of Africa, Asia, and Latin America and seeks to develop a comparative analysis of the divergent developmental experiences of Africa and the BRIC economies. The module locates the debates and issues that it explores within both an historical and global context and encourages students to explore the inter-dependence of the developed and developing world.

Plus one module from: 

  • Social theory and modern society
    What is modernity and how has it shaped society and sociology? Across all the social sciences there is a powerful awareness that western society changed around the 1750s – in a word it began to become ‘modern’. This has been seen as a largely positive change by most people, politicians and sociologists. But what is involved in the change, how did it shape the West, what did this mean for non-Western societies, and has it all been positive? We will engage with all these questions, around issues of class, bureaucracy, rationality, order and the Holocaust.
  • Social research skills 2
    This module introduces students to the basics of qualitative research methodologies. You learn about central philosophical questions in the philosophy of the social sciences and how they relate to the qualitative/quantitative distinction.  You'll develop a range of qualitative data collection techniques ranging from interviews to archival research.  They are also introduced to different qualitative analytic techniques. Finally we'll investigate the ethical issues that are specific to qualitative research. We teach this module through lectures and workshops where you apply the principles you've learned to specific research questions.

Year 3

  • Contemporary dynamics of the world system
    This module explores the structures, dynamics and transformations of world orders and provides students with an understanding of international relations since the demise of the nineteenth-century Pax Britannica. We'll explore successive world orders, analysing the period of rivalry between the major powers (1875-1945), and the era of Cold War bi-polarity and Pax Americana (1945-1990). We'll focus on post-Cold War developments, including the rise of China, the debate on US empire and hegemony, and processes of globalization and transnationalisation. We'll also explore contemporary patterns of international disorder, including the developing multi-polarity and the rise of transnational Islamic activism. Assessment: seminar presentation (20%), 1,000-word book review (30%) and 2-hr exam (50%).
  • Crimes of the powerful: states, corporations and human rights
    This module explores the phenomena of state crime, corporate crime and the involvement of powerful social forces in human rights abuses. We'll examine the problems involved in conceptualising state crimes and human rights and looks at contemporary crimes against humanity, including in the area of environmental rights. We'll also explore the problems involved in regulating and controlling state crime and human rights atrocities in which states and state officials play a key role. The critical engagement with globalization provides a  you with a framework to explore significant contemporary debates and developments. Assessment: 500-word annotated bibliography (20%) and 2,500-word case study (80%).
  • Politics and protest: new social and political movements
    This module examines forms of social and political conflict located within contemporary western societies. The main focus is on understanding social movements and forms of political contention in the changing social structure of these societies. Although it has a contemporary western focus, we'll situate discussion in the context of historical and comparative material on social movements. Our emphasis throughout will be on examining the ability of social and political theory to understand the nature of political identity and its expression in social movements both in the past and in the present.
  • Research project (double module)
    This Level 6 double module covers two semesters and consists of the research for and completion of an academic project with a 10,000 word limit. You'll choose an IR subject relevant to the study of International Relations in which they wish to specialise, and then undertake and complete the project. During the whole process, from choice of subject to final submission, you'll have the support and guidance of an academic supervisor. Assessment: project proposal (15%) and 10,000-word project (80%).

Plus one module from: 

  • Sociology for the 21st century
    The world is changing. Huge advances in areas such as information technology, computing, communications, mobile devices, transport, and building techniques are changing the way we interact, do business, build cities, and go about our daily lives. How do the theories that have dominated sociological thinking relate to and comprehend these changes? Do we need new theories? This module will look at the latest sociological theories that are trying to understand what these changes are, how they affect society, and how sociology itself might have to change.
  • Race, culture and identity
    This module addresses the centrality of race and ethnicity to social relations. We'll analyse race and ethnicity within a changing scholarship and within their historical, cultural, political and theoretical contexts. Theoretical understandings of the intersectionality of race, gender and sexuality will also be explored, highlighting their impact on all aspects of people’s lives. The complexities of analysing race, gender and sexuality are applied to representations in cultural forms, such as media and film. We'll also demonstrates how the concepts covered have been influential in shaping public policy.

Employability

Graduates are in demand for their skill-mix: 

  • analysis
  • critical thinking
  • research
  • good communication skills. 

As a graduate you’ll be able to appreciate that problems are often multi-faceted and require thoughtful, creative and logical approaches. Such graduates are highly valuable (in both commercial and Not-for- Profit sectors) because of their ability to contribute to strategic decision making. 

Typical careers are: 

  • teaching
  • voluntary sector project management
  • work in NGOs, local and central government
  • general commercial businesses.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

  • direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
  • Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
  • mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

Placements

Staff

Prof. Craig Barker

School/Division: Law and Social Sciences / Law
Job title: Dean, School of Law and Social Sciences

Prof. Craig Barker is the Dean of the School of Law and Social Sciences and a Professor of International Law. Appointed in 2015, Prof. Barker has taught extensively in the areas of domestic and international law, as well as international politics. He is a leading international expert on issues relating to diplomatic law.


Dr Caitriona Beaumont

School/Division: Law and Social Sciences / Social Sciences
Job title: Associate Professor in Social History; Director of Research, School of Law and Social Sciences

Caitriona's major research interests are in gender and history, voluntary action, Irish and British nineteenth and twentieth century social history, history of women's organisations and histories of the women's movement.


Dr Matthew Bond

School/Division: Law and Social Sciences / Social Sciences
Job title: Course Director, Sociology

Dr Matthew Bond is Senior Lecturer in the Department of Social Sciences and Course Director of the Sociology undergraduate programme.


Dr Adrian Budd

School/Division: Law and Social Sciences / Social Sciences
Job title: Head of Division of Social Sciences

Dr Budd specialises in International Relations, with interests in international theory, imperialism, and globalisation. His last book analysed neo-Gramscian international relations theory.


Dr Jaya Gajparia

School/Division: Law and Social Sciences / Social Sciences
Job title: Course Director, Education for Sustainability; Lecturer in Sociology

Dr Jaya Gajparia is the Couse Director of the Masters programme in Education for Sustainability, an internationally recognised distance learning programme established in 1994. She also teaches on a variety of Undergraduate Sociology courses.


Dr Julien Morton

School/Division: Law and Social Sciences / Social Sciences
Job title: Senior Lecturer

Dr Morton is interested in philosophy of science and the theory of agency.


Dr Lisa Pine

School/Division: Law and Social Sciences / Social Sciences
Job title: Associate Professor

Dr Pine currently teaches modules on 'Revolutions, Wars and the Making of the Modern World', 'War and Social Change in the Twentieth Century' and 'Genocide and Crimes against Humanity'.


Dr Shaminder Takhar

School/Division: Law and Social Sciences / Social Sciences
Job title: Associate Professor in Sociology

Dr Shaminder Takhar is Associate Professor in Sociology specialising in race, gender, sexuality and social justice. She is the research ethics co-ordinator for the School of Law and Social Sciences.


Facilities

Teaching and learning

You can expect to be taught through a mix of innovative and traditional teaching methods: 

  • social media
  • blogs
  • presentations
  • group work
  • policy briefs
  • essay writing
  • dissertations. 

Our central London location means that our you can benefit from London’s rich resources: 

  • the British Library
  • the Imperial War Museum
  • the Institute of Historical Research
  • the Wiener Library
  • the Women’s Library @LSE
  • the Black Cultural Archive.

Entry requirements

2017 Entry

  • A Level BCC or:
  • BTEC National Diploma DMM or:
  • Access to HE qualifications with 9 Distinctions and 36 Merits or:
  • Equivalent Level 3 qualifications worth 112 UCAS points
  • Applicants must hold 5 GCSEs A-C including Maths and English, or equivalent (reformed GCSEs grade 4 or above).

2018 Entry

  • A Level BCC or:
  • BTEC National Diploma MMM or:
  • Access to HE qualifications with 9 Distinctions and 36 Merits or:
  • Equivalent Level 3 qualifications worth 106 UCAS points
  • Applicants must hold 5 GCSEs A-C including Maths and English, or equivalent (reformed GCSEs grade 4 or above).

How to apply

International (non Home/EU) applicants should follow our international how to apply guide.

Instructions for Home/EU applicants
Mode Duration Start date Application code Application method
Mode
Part-time
Duration
5 years
Start date
September
Application code
4827
Application method
Mode
Full-time
Duration
3 years
Start date
September
Application code
L2L2
Application method

All full-time undergraduate students apply to the Universities and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) using the University's Institution Code L75. Full details of how to do this are supplied on our How to apply webpage for undergraduate students.

All part-time students should apply directly to London South Bank University and full details of how to do this are given on our undergraduate How to apply webpage.

Accommodation

Students should apply for accommodation at London South Bank University (LSBU) as soon as possible, once we have made an offer of a place on one of our academic courses. Read more about applying for accommodation at LSBU.

Finance

It's a good idea to think about how you'll pay university tuition and maintenance costs while you're still applying for a place to study. Remember – you don't need to wait for a confirmed place on a course to start applying for student finance. Read how to pay your fees as an undergraduate student.

Fees for 2017

Fees for 2017 have not yet been published for this course. Please check back later in the year. Fees are likely to be in line with the rest of our undergraduate degree programmes.

Fees and funding

Fees are shown for new entrants to courses, for each individual year of a course, together with the total fee for all the years of a course. Continuing LSBU students should refer to the Finance section of our student portal, MyLSBU. Queries regarding fees should be directed to the Fees and Bursary Team on: +44 (0)20 7815 6181.

Part-time
The fee shown is for entry 2017/18.
UK/EU fee: £5550International fee: £7500
AOS/LSBU code: 4827Session code: 1PS00
Total course fee:
UK/EU £27750
International £37500

For more information, including how and when to pay, see our fees and funding section for undergraduate students.

Possible fee changes

Current regulatory proposals suggest that institutions will be permitted to increase fee levels in line with inflation up to a specified fee cap. Specifically, LSBU may be permitted to increase its fees for new and existing Home and EU undergraduate students from 2017/18 onwards. The University reserves the right to increase its fees in line with changes to legislation, regulation and any governmental guidance or decisions.

The fees for international students are reviewed annually, and additionally the University reserves the right to increase tuition fees in line with inflation up to 4 per cent.

Scholarships

We offer students considerable financial help through scholarships, bursaries, charitable funds, loans and other financial support. Many of our scholarships are given as direct tuition fee discounts and we encourage all eligible students to apply for our Access Bursary. New home full-time undergraduate students meeting eligibility criteria could receive a £1,000 cash bursary by joining us in the 2017/18 academic year. Find out more about all our scholarships and fee discounts for undergraduate students.

International students

As well as being potentially eligible for our undergraduate scholarships, International students can also benefit from a range of specialist scholarships. Find out more about International scholarships.

Please check your fee status and whether you are considered a home, EU or international student for fee-paying purposes by reading the UKCISA regulations.

Case studies

Select a case study and read about practical project work, students' placement experiences, research projects, alumni career achievements and what it’s really like to study here from the student perspective.

Prepare to start

We help our students prepare for university even before the semester starts. To find out when you should apply for your LSBU accommodation or student finance read the How to apply tab for this course.

Applicant Open Days

To help you and your family feel confident about your university choice we run Applicant Open Days. These are held at subject level so students start getting to know each other and the academic staff who will be teaching them. These events are for applicants only and as an applicant you would receive an email invitation to attend the relevant event for your subject.

Enrolment and Induction

Enrolment takes place before you start your course. On completing the process, new students formally join the University. Enrolment consists of two stages: online, and your face-to-face enrolment meeting. The online process is an online data gathering exercise that you will complete yourself, then you will be invited to your face-to-face enrolment meeting.

In September, applicants who have accepted an unconditional offer to study at LSBU will be sent details of induction, which is when they are welcomed to the University and their School. Induction helps you get the best out of your university experience, and makes sure you have all the tools to succeed in your studies.

Read more about Enrolment and Induction.

 
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Open day 11th November
Teaching excellence framework
Contact information

Course Enquiries - UK/EU

Tel: 0800 923 8888

Tel: +44 (0) 20 7815 6100

Get in touch

Course Enquiries - International

Tel: +44 (0) 20 7815 6189

Get in touch
 
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