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History with Politics BA (Hons)

Unistats

What is Unistats?

Key Information Set (KIS) Data is only gathered for undergraduate full-time courses. There are a number of reasons why this course does not have KIS data associated with it. For example, it may be a franchise course run at a partner college or a course designed for continuing professional development.

Overview

This course is new for September 2017 entry

How has the past influenced and changed contemporary society and politics? What can history teach us about how change happens and how political systems and democratic processes evolve over time? Study history with politics and you'll gain a greater understanding of how society and political systems work.

History with Politics student in a seminar

7 reasons to study here

Taught by experienced historians: with national and international reputations, who contribute to public policy debate and publish original research.
Fit to your interests: optional modules - and work placement opportunities - allow you to tailor your degree to your interests and future career ambitions.
London's rich resources: the British Library, the Imperial War Museum, the Institute of Historical Research, the Wiener Library, the Women’s Library @LSE and the Black Cultural Archive.
Guest speakers: benefit from inspiring speakers from public, private sector and third sector organisations, as well as academia, who bring specialisms and real world contextualisation.
Innovative and traditional teaching methods: digital resources, social media (for example twitter), blogs, presentations, policy briefs, group work, essay writing and dissertations.
Overall excellence: No.3 in London Modern Universities for overall score in Politics (Complete University Guide League Table, 2018).
Overall excellence: No.3 in London Modern Universities for overall score in Politics (Complete University Guide League Table, 2018).

This degree course covers...

  • British, Irish and American history
  • the history of the empire
  • politics, decision making and democracy
  • protest movements and activism
  • war and social change in the 20th century
  • globalisation and development.

You'll examine the key issues relevant to the global community today - and their historical basis. This degree equips you to pursue a fulfilling future career as a historically-informed and globally-engaged citizen.

Key course information - ordered by mode
Mode Duration Start date Location
Mode
Part-time
Duration
5 years
Start Date
September
Location
Southwark Campus
Mode
Full-time
Duration
3 years
Start Date
September
Location
Southwark Campus

Modules

Year 1

  • Historical sources and methods
    This module enables you to develop your own personal research skills e-portfolio by giving you supervised practice at note-taking, referencing, group-work, participation in class debate, research and production of an extensive bibliography for their independent research project. You'll be introduced to the range of sources available to them as historians including secondary sources, archival sources and digital sources. A number of visits will be made to key libraries and archives including the London Metropolitan Archive and the Women’s Library @ LSE. Taught through: lectures, workshops, group work and trips to libraries/archives. Assessment: independent research project presented as an e-portfolio to be submitted at the end of the module. (2000 words).
  • Revolutions, wars and the making of the modern world
    This module introduces some of the major themes and events in modern world history. It begins with an examination of the Enlightenment and the French Revolution. It moves on to look at the Industrial Revolution, national unification movements in Italy and Germany in the nineteenth century, Empire, the First World War and the ideologies of Fascism, Nazism and Soviet Communism. It looks at the impact of key historical figures such as Lenin, Stalin, Mussolini and Hitler and their impact on the shape of the modern world. Taught through: weekly lectures, seminars and group debates. Assessment: group work and presentation (40%) and 1,500-word essay (60%).
  • Introduction to political theory
    You'll be introduced to key ideas and concepts in political theory. These include democracy, freedom, justice and power. These ideas and concepts are explored in the social and historical contexts in which they developed. You'll also be encouraged to explore the way that these ideas and concept have been transformed historically and the manner in which they are mobilised in contemporary political debates.
  • Historical practice and research
    This module introduces the key issues and current debates in historical methodology. You'll identify and critically assess different forms of history writing, ranging from the Whig and Marxist schools of history, to the writing of feminist, women's and gender history. The module will also introduce the wide range of sources available to you as a historian and allow you to make use of and evaluate such historical sources, such as, archival material, oral history, the internet and historical databases. Taught through: lectures, seminars and visits to archives, libraries and museums (the National Library of Women, the British Library National Sound Archive, and the Public Record Office). Assessment 1,000-word literature review (50%) and 1,000-word essay (50%).
  • War and social change in the 20th century
    This module introduces the major themes and events in twentieth century world history from the Second World War onward. It examines contemporary historical events that have impacted society, including the Cold War, decolonisation, Mao Zedong and the Chinese Communist revolution, the effect of New Right ideologies in the 1980's, the fall of the Soviet Union and its consequences, globalisation, as well as moves towards European integration and the development of the European Union. You'll analyse the impact of these key events on the shaping of the modern and contemporary world. Taught through: weekly lectures and seminars. Assessment 2,000-word essay (100%).
  • Politics, decision making and democracy
    This module engages with political institutions and processes. Focusing on the British experience to illustrate wider trends, you'll explore the framework and dynamics of political power and the British system of governance. You'll investigate formal aspects of British politics including political parties and the role of ideology in shaping policies and programmes and civil society. You'll analyse and evaluate key institutions, such as, prime minister and cabinet, parliament and local government. You'll also explore democracy beyond the formal realm, including the role of media and pressure groups in the political process. Taught through: weekly lectures and seminars. Assessment: 1,500-word essay (50%) and 1.5 hour exam (50%).

Year 2

  • Global governance, regionalism and the nation state
    This module explores the complex, dialectical (non-linear) economic, social and political relations between nation-states, regionalisation and globalisation. Regionalisation has emerged across the world, but is most developed in Europe. You'll also explore the role of international organizations in the global system, with particular emphasis on the United Nations system, including International Financial Institutions. You'll critically reflect on state power and global inter-dependence in the 21st Century. Taught through: lectures, seminars and workshops. Assessment: an international news journal diary (50%) and a two-hour exam (50%).
  • American history and American cinema
    This module introduces key events in American history 1860-2000. Themes include: liberty, freedom, democracy and the concept of the frontier in American culture. You'll assess American history through the lens of American cinema and popular culture. You'll consider how gender, race, religion and sexuality have shaped American society and how these themes are represented in film and popular culture over the course of the twentieth century. Taught through: lectures, workshops, film screenings and group work/group presentations. Assessment: group presentation (50%) and 2-hour exam (50%).
  • 20th century British history: democracy, crisis and modernity
    This module explores the history of Britain over the course of the twentieth century.  Picking up on themes first introduced in the Level 4 module Industry, Empire and Society: Britain 1750-1900 this module traces the social, economic, political and cultural changes and continuities within Britain during the years 1900-2000. You'll focus on the themes of class, gender, ethnicity, activism, democratic rights, social policy, sexuality, leisure and consumption.  You'll also cover key developments in the histories of Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland  to ensure you have an inclusive understanding of life in Britain in the twentieth century. Taught through: weekly lectures, seminars and group work. Assessment: 3,000-word essay (100%).
  • Issues in criminal justice history

Plus two optional modules from:

  • Gender difference and equality
    In the past few decades work on gender has been crucial in challenging mainstream sociological thought, and in making exciting and innovative contributions to sociological theory, methodology and policy. This Module addresses equality and diversity by focusing on the issue of gender difference and equality through the study of historical and contemporary debates on a range of topical issues reflecting diversity and equality issues in contemporary British society. Taught through: lectures and workshops. Assessment: 1,500-word essay (50%) and 2,000-word document report (50%). 
  • The environment, sustainability and climate change
    This module provides a grounding in the study of the politics of environmental sustainability. The module focuses firstly on the debate on environmental sustainability which includes the challenge by environmentalists that it is a contradiction. Alternative approaches will also be examined including: green theory, the free market and Marxist approaches. The second part of the module looks at increasing global competition for water, food, energy and oil. The politics of climate change and deforestation; transport and tourism; global security and justice will also be covered. The third part of the course focuses on case studies of organisations and movements involved in environmental sustainability. We'll look into the IPCC; Copenhagen Climate Council; the Fair Trade Movement; Ethical Consumerism and the Environmental Movement. 
  • Work placement
    This module provides an opportunity for you to work in a setting directly related to your area of study. It will enable you to to explore and reinforce the interface between theory and practice in a professional setting. Voluntary and community sector organisations with a registered charity number and most political organisations are suitable for work placements. However you'll need to meet and consult with your Module Coordinator to identify an appropriate voluntary sector and/or political organisation for you. Taught through: practical on-the-job work experience. Assessment: 1,000-word self-reflective report (30%), 2,500-word critical evaluation and action plan (70%).
  • European politics in transition
    The module looks at political processes in Europe in a comparative perspective. It aims to examine the factors that explain the continuity and stability of politics in Europe as well as the changes that have taken place over the last two decades. The module looks at ideology, power and decision making. There is a focus on political events and policy processes, looking at both individual nation states and the European Union. An organising theme of the module is the impact of the end of the cold war on the politics of Europe over the last two decades.
  • Globalisation and development
    This module introduces key concepts, issues and theoretical debates in development studies. The module focuses on the developing societies of Africa, Asia, and Latin America and seeks to develop a comparative analysis of the divergent developmental experiences of Africa and the BRIC economies. The module locates the debates and issues that it explores within both an historical and global context and encourages students to explore the inter-dependence of the developed and developing world. 

Year 3

  • Research project

Plus four modules from:

  • Life and times in Nazi Germany
    This module analyses the rise of Hitler and the history of Nazism. You'll examine how Hitler consolidated his power and the relationship between the dictatorial regime and the German people. It deals with aspects of everyday life, such as coercion and consensus, propaganda and the use of terror, including the secret police and the concentration camp system. The module also analyses Nazi ideology, Nazi economic policy, foreign policy, resistance, education and youth groups. You'll examine cultural life, including cinema, theatre, art, architecture, literature, music, as well as the press and radio. Taught through: weekly lectures and seminars. Assessment: 4,000-word essay (100%).
  • Modern Ireland: from independence to the Celtic tiger
    This module introduces you to the history of Ireland from the foundation of the Irish Free State in 1922 to the end of the 1990s and the economic boom known as the ‘Celtic Tiger’. Key events in Irish history are explored including: the Irish Civil War, War of Independence, the ‘Troubles’ in Northern Ireland and the Good Friday Agreement. You'll examine the lived experience of citizens in the new Irish State with a particular focus on culture, identity, gender and religion.  Ireland’s changing relationship with the UK is a key feature of this module. Taught through: lectures, seminars and group work. Assessment: 1,000-word book review (50%) and 3,000-word essay (50%).
  • Suffrage to citizenship: female activism in 20th century Britain
    This module explores the agency and activism of women in Britain throughout the course of the 20th century. You'll assess the engagement of women in a number of campaigns including the suffrage movement, the peace movement, social welfare reform, gender equality, the labour movement, the Women’s Liberation Movement and ‘third wave’ feminism.  A broad definition of activism is applied and the campaigning activities of women from diverse backgrounds and a wide range of organisations will be included. You'll evaluate and highlight the contribution made by women to civil society in twentieth century Britain. Taught through: lectures, seminars and group work. Assessment: legislative action report (50%) - a 2,000-word report on one piece of legislation passed as a result of female activism and campaigning and a 2-hr exam (50%).
  • Black history
    This module explores the concept of black history within American and British historiography questioning and challenging debates around the idea of ‘black history’. You'll consider these debates and learn about key moments in British black history over the course of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. You'll critically examine concepts such as ‘diaspora’, ‘post- colonialism’ and ‘multiculturalism’. Films, documentaries, music and art will be included as sources for the module and visits will be made to libraries and archives including the London Metropolitan Archive and the Black Cultural Archive. Taught through: a mix of lectures, workshops, group work and trips to libraries/archives. Assessment: 1,000-word report (30%) and short film (70%) 5-10 minutes using basic phone/iPad technology to document a chosen aspect of British black life. The film is accompanied by a written narrative (1,000-word). 
  • Genocide and crimes against humanity
    This module explores the history of genocide and crimes against humanity in the twentieth century and beyond. It begins with an introduction to the related concepts of genocide and crimes against humanity before considering a range of events including colonial genocides, the Armenian Genocide, the Nazi ‘Final Solution’, alleged genocides in Cambodia, Yugoslavia and Rwanda, as well as cases of genocide in the twenty first century in Darfur and the Democratic Republic of the Congo. You'll analyse the dynamics of genocide and crimes against humanity in order to shed light upon their origins, characteristics and consequences. Taught through: a mix of lectures and seminars. Assessment: 4,000-word essay (100%).
  • Politics and protest
    This module examines forms of social and political conflict located within contemporary western societies. The main focus is on understanding social movements and forms of political contention in the changing social structure of these societies. You'll examine the ability of social and political theory to understand the nature of political identity and its expression in social movements both in the past and in the present. Taught through: a mix of lectures, seminars and group work. Assessment: 2-hr exam (100%).
  • Contemporary dynamics of the world system
    Module description to follow.

Employability

History graduates have the ability to apply an analytical mindset to all kinds of problems and situations. These problem-solving and analytical skills are relevant in just about any industry which has a focus on current societies and future developments. 

You'll acquire all of the key skills demanded by graduate employers: 

  • oral and written skills
  • problem-solving
  • planning and organisation
  • teamwork
  • presentation skills
  • decision making
  • drive
  • digital literacy
  • initiative
  • resilience
  • project management skills.

Typical career paths include: 

  • teaching and research
  • archives and heritage
  • politics
  • media 
  • business and commerce
  • the charity sector
  • marketing, advertising and PR
  • law.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

  • direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
  • Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
  • mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

Placements

Staff

Dr Caitriona Beaumont

School/Division: Law and Social Sciences / Social Sciences
Job title: Associate Professor in Social History; Director of Research, School of Law and Social Sciences

Caitriona's major research interests are in gender and history, voluntary action, Irish and British nineteenth and twentieth century social history, history of women's organisations and histories of the women's movement.


Dr Adrian Budd

School/Division: Law and Social Sciences / Social Sciences
Job title: Head of Division of Social Sciences

Dr Budd specialises in International Relations, with interests in international theory, imperialism, and globalisation. His last book analysed neo-Gramscian international relations theory.


Facilities

Teaching and learning

Our teaching methods are varied and innovative. For example, students will use a wide range of sources and methods throughout their studies including:

  • digital resources
  • social media (for example twitter)
  • blogs
  • presentations
  • group work
  • policy briefs
  • essay writing
  • dissertations.

Level 4

At Level 4 modules are designed to provide an introductory grounding in key issues and debates in the study of modern and contemporary history. You are given the opportunity to engage in historical debate and work with primary and secondary sources. Particular emphasis is placed on the resources for historians in London and the importance of utilising a wide range of diverse sources. As a result you'll visit archives and libraries in their first year of study including the Black Cultural Archives, the Women’s Library @ LSE and the London Metropolitan Archives.

Level 5

At Level 5 the degree programme builds on your knowledge. The work placement also gives you the chance to apply your knowledge in a work environment and you'll be encouraged to find work placements in a variety of settings including libraries, archives, museums and local history organisations.

Level 6

At Level 6 your knowledge and skills come together laying a foundation for future employment or further study. The modules at Level 6 interrogate more deeply core subject knowledge and learning outcomes, notably around the themes of diversity, equality and activism. The final year dissertation will further develop your independent research and project management skills.

Expert staff

The main areas of research of staff in the past five years include:

  • History of female activism and women’s movement s in Britain and Ireland
  • The social and economic history of Nazi Germany
  • Global women’s movements and activism
  • International Relations theory
  • Global political economy
  • International human rights
  • Sexualities and society
  • Human trafficking
  • Sustainability and climate change.

Entry requirements

2017 Entry

  • A Level BCC or:
  • BTEC National Diploma DMM or:
  • Access to HE qualifications with 9 Distinctions and 36 Merits or:
  • Equivalent Level 3 qualifications worth 112 UCAS points
  • Applicants must hold 5 GCSEs A-C Maths and English (reformed GCSEs grade 4 or above).

2018 Entry

  • A Level BCC or:
  • BTEC National Diploma MMM or:
  • Access to HE qualifications with 9 Distinctions and 36 Merits or:
  • Equivalent Level 3 qualifications worth 106 UCAS points
  • Applicants must hold 5 GCSEs A-C including Maths and English, or equivalent (reformed GCSEs grade 4 or above).

How to apply

2017 entry

All Home and EU students who want to start a full-time or part-time undergraduate course this September can apply to us today if you have your results. You'll be applying through Clearing which allows you to apply directly to LSBU. Before applying to LSBU you need to have:

  1. all your exam results
  2. already applied with UCAS
  3. know the course you're interested in studying - complete a course search

When you're ready call 0800 923 8888 or apply online through Clearing. Read more on our Clearing information page. Students applying for full-time undergraduate health courses can only apply online.

International students (non-EU) who are not applying through UCAS for 2017 entry can complete the LSBU International Online Application Form - visit the International how to apply page.

2018 entry

International (non Home/EU) applicants should follow our international how to apply guide.

Instructions for Home/EU applicants
Mode Duration Start date Application code Application method
Mode
Part-time
Duration
5 years
Start date
September
Application code
4818
Application method
Mode
Full-time
Duration
3 years
Start date
September
Application code
V1L2
Application method

All full-time undergraduate students apply to the Universities and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) using the University's Institution Code L75. Full details of how to do this are supplied on our How to apply webpage for undergraduate students.

All part-time students should apply directly to London South Bank University and full details of how to do this are given on our undergraduate How to apply webpage.

Accommodation

Students should apply for accommodation at London South Bank University (LSBU) as soon as possible, once we have made an offer of a place on one of our academic courses. Read more about applying for accommodation at LSBU.

Finance

It's a good idea to think about how you'll pay university tuition and maintenance costs while you're still applying for a place to study. Remember – you don't need to wait for a confirmed place on a course to start applying for student finance. Read how to pay your fees as an undergraduate student.

Fees and funding

Fees are shown for new entrants to courses, for each individual year of a course, together with the total fee for all the years of a course. Continuing LSBU students should refer to the Finance section of our student portal, MyLSBU. Queries regarding fees should be directed to the Fees and Bursary Team on: +44 (0)20 7815 6181.

Full-time
Part-time
The fee shown is for entry 2017/18.
UK/EU fee: £9250.00International fee: £12500.00
AOS/LSBU code: 4817Session code: 1FS00
Total course fee:
UK/EU £18500.00
International £25000.00
The fee shown is for entry 2017/18.
UK/EU fee: £5550.00International fee: £7500.00
AOS/LSBU code: 4818Session code: 1PS00
Total course fee:
UK/EU £22200.00
International £30000.00

For more information, including how and when to pay, see our fees and funding section for undergraduate students.

Possible fee changes

Current regulatory proposals suggest that institutions will be permitted to increase fee levels in line with inflation up to a specified fee cap. Specifically, LSBU may be permitted to increase its fees for new and existing Home and EU undergraduate students from 2017/18 onwards. The University reserves the right to increase its fees in line with changes to legislation, regulation and any governmental guidance or decisions.

The fees for international students are reviewed annually, and additionally the University reserves the right to increase tuition fees in line with inflation up to 4 per cent.

Scholarships

We offer students considerable financial help through scholarships, bursaries, charitable funds, loans and other financial support. Many of our scholarships are given as direct tuition fee discounts and we encourage all eligible students to apply for our Access Bursary. New home full-time undergraduate students meeting eligibility criteria could receive a £1,000 cash bursary by joining us in the 2017/18 academic year. Find out more about all our scholarships and fee discounts for undergraduate students.

International students

As well as being potentially eligible for our undergraduate scholarships, International students can also benefit from a range of specialist scholarships. Find out more about International scholarships.

Please check your fee status and whether you are considered a home, EU or international student for fee-paying purposes by reading the UKCISA regulations.

Fees for 2017

Fees for 2017 have not yet been published for this course. Please check back later in the year. Fees are likely to be in line with the rest of our undergraduate degree programmes.

Case studies

Select a case study and read about practical project work, students' placement experiences, research projects, alumni career achievements and what it’s really like to study here from the student perspective.

Prepare to start

We help our students prepare for university even before the semester starts. To find out when you should apply for your LSBU accommodation or student finance read the How to apply tab for this course.

Applicant Open Days

To help you and your family feel confident about your university choice we run Applicant Open Days. These are held at subject level so students start getting to know each other and the academic staff who will be teaching them. These events are for applicants only and as an applicant you would receive an email invitation to attend the relevant event for your subject.

Enrolment and Induction

Enrolment takes place before you start your course. On completing the process, new students formally join the University. Enrolment consists of two stages: online, and your face-to-face enrolment meeting. The online process is an online data gathering exercise that you will complete yourself, then you will be invited to your face-to-face enrolment meeting.

In September, applicants who have accepted an unconditional offer to study at LSBU will be sent details of induction, which is when they are welcomed to the University and their School. Induction helps you get the best out of your university experience, and makes sure you have all the tools to succeed in your studies.

Read more about Enrolment and Induction.

 
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Teaching excellence framework
Course open for 2017 UKEU applicants
This course is still open for 2017 to international applicants
Contact information

Course Enquiries - UK/EU

Tel: 0800 923 8888

Tel: +44 (0) 20 7815 6100

Get in touch

Course Enquiries - International

Tel: +44 (0) 20 7815 6189

Get in touch
 
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