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Research degrees

A postgraduate student looking over a barrier in K2 building

We help students pursue developed intellectual interests or something new

LSBU postgraduate research degrees

At LSBU we offer the following postgraduate research degrees through our London Doctoral Academy. These degrees are designed to help you become an innovative and critical expert in your chosen field:

  • Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)
  • Professional Doctorates in a range of areas including:
    • Education Doctorate (EdD); and
    • Health and Social Care
  • Masters by Research, MA (Res) or MSc (Res)

More information on specific degrees and their entry requirements is available on our Course finder and List of Awards.

Studentships

We also work with many businesses on major commercial research projects where a postgraduate researcher is incorporated in their projects, often along with additional academic research input from the University. The business and the University jointly cover fees, provide an annual living allowance, and cover other fees such as extended conference funding.

PhD Scholarship in Ultra Wide Band (UWB) Imaging Augmented by the Combination of Tomography and Radar Techniques

Description

UWB imaging has attracted growing attention in this last decade, especially for its applicability to diagnostic imaging such as breast cancer detection, motivated by the contrast in the dielectric properties at microwave frequencies of normal and malignant tissues. Current research in UWB imaging can be divided mainly into tomography and radar techniques. While tomography implies to solve a non-linear ill-posed inverse problem to reconstruct dielectric constant/conductivity profiles, UWB radar techniques are linear techniques, which may be applied in time or in frequency domain with the aim of identifying the main scattering points inside the investigation domain. Hitherto, no attempt has been made to combine tomography and radar techniques. This research will investigate the combination of tomography and radar techniques to enhance UWB imaging performances, both in terms of resolution and signal to noise ratio, benefitting UWB imaging applications, such as diagnostic (breast cancer, stroke detection, bone assessment) and industrial (quality check, security screening). The main aims of the project are listed below:

  • to understand UWB imaging tomography and radar techniques;
  • to develop a theoretical framework for combining tomography and radar techniques;
  • to perform electromagnetic simulation to verify and assess the theoretical framework;
  • to perform measurements in anechoic chamber using dedicated antennas and phantoms;
  • to implement the findings in dedicated UWB waveguide-based apparatus, thus performing experiments using a realistic medical device with dedicated phantoms;
  • to develop highly skilled expert in the field of biomedical imaging capable of delivering research goals and further developing new systems.

The successful student will use a dedicated software (CST), anechoic chamber, UWB antennas, UWB measurement tools, phantoms; all available at LSBU.

Supervisory team
Professor Sandra Dudley and Professor Mohammad Ghavami are both internationally recognised researchers in communication and UWB systems. You will join the Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Communications (BiMEC) and work alongside a range of new and experienced PhD students in a collaborative environment.
Requirements

Applications are invited from UK/EU and overseas students with, or expecting to obtain, a first or upper second class honours degree in Electrical & Electronic Engineering, Mathematics, Physics or similar numerate discipline to join the School of Engineering for 3 year fully funded PhD programmes for the PhD places below. Students with relevant MSc and MRes are also welcome to apply.

The closing date for applications is 20 August 2019.

PhD Scholarship in 2D Materials for Future Wireless Communications

Description

This will be a fully funded studentship for an EU/UK applicant who is keen to conduct research into the theory and manufacture of 2D nanomaterials for small, short-range communication systems.

Development of the Internet of Things (IoT) as well societal demands have promoted the interest for thin and wearable electronic devices. Importantly, the radio frequency (RF) antennas play a key role in facilitating the communication between devices. Typically, antennas are fabricated using metals such as copper, silver, etc. Despite notable advantages, the existing materials exhibit common challenges including cost, bulkiness and skin depths, factors that limit the manufacturing of thin, transparent, light and flexible antennas. Therefore, in view of these issues there is a strong need for high-performance antenna materials.

This project takes an integrated approach. It involves design, engineer, and validate high-performance 2D nanomaterials for wireless communications. The 2D derivatives will be delivered via an environmentally benign, rapid and controllable Continuous Hydrothermal Flow Synthesis (CHFS) route (a synthetic process that is at the forefront of nanomaterials manufacturing approaches). The as-synthesized and characterized materials will be printed and fabricated into antennas and their performance will be tested.

The student will use unique Continuous Hydrothermal Flow Synthesis apparatus and a broad range of materials characterisation techniques including X-Ray Powder Diffraction, Raman Spectroscopy, Atomic Force Microscopy, BET surface area technique, electron microscopy as well as dedicated software (CST), anechoic chamber, antenna measurement tools, all available at LSBU.

Supervisory team

The successful applicant will be working with Dr Suela Kellici in Nano2D Lab, specialising in 2D materials engineering using innovative techniques, and Prof Sandra Dudley with expertise in antenna design and wireless communications.

How to apply

Informal enquiries should be directed to Dr Suela Kellici. To apply, send a copy of your CV with a covering letter to Dr Kellici. References will be obtained following interview of shortlisted candidates.

The closing date for applications is 20 August 2019.

Applicants must be of outstanding academic merit and should have (or be expected to gain) either a 1st class Honours degree or an upper second class (or the international equivalent) or an MSc with distinction in a related field such as Chemistry, Electrical and Electronic Engineering or Physics. Enthusiastic and self-motivated candidates with background in either Chemistry/Materials Science/Physics are encouraged to apply. A good knowledge of electronic material properties and/or radio frequency engineering along with experience in programming and computational modelling would be advantageous.

PhD Scholarship in New Hybrid (pyroelectric/catalyst) Materials and the Development of New Reactor Vessels

Description

Annually a large amount of energy produced from all sources, 340 Exajoule, is rejected as waste heat. Low grade waste heat with a temperature less than 100 celsius constitutes approximately 60% of this. Recovering just 1.5% of this discarded energy can generate more electricity than the current total of wind, solar and tide. Unarguably, low-grade waste heat represents an extremely promising source of renewable energy.

Functional materials have attracted significant attention due to the variety of appealing structural, electronic and catalytic properties available. These materials display a rich variety of surface interactions related to their polar structures and can drive chemical reactions. The intrinsic features of functional systems make these materials an ideal playground for optimised sustainable energy production. Our recent experimental work has opened a new route to hydrogen evolution. Novelty in this PhD project comes from probing surface interactions by new hybrid (pyroelectric/catalyst) materials and in developing new reactor vessels for the system.

A range of questions have been generated from our proof-of-principle study including those related to methods to increase hydrogen production. These questions represent opportunities to be investigated with a view to maximising thermal energy conversion into a fuel. Realising the full potential of pyroelectric based materials by optimising processing and surface interactions, which is related to change of ferroelectric polarisation, requires a combined experimental and analytical effort. For this we bring together a team with complementary expertise in the synthesis of materials, materials manufacturing, analysis of functional properties and characterisation of water splitting performance.

Supervisory team

The supervisors of this project have supported over 25 PhD to completion and are well prepared for such an exciting opportunity to develop new systems for reducing the impact of climate change in energy production. Please contact Professor Steve Dunn for more information.

Requirements

Applications are invited from UK/EU and overseas students with, or expecting to obtain, a first or upper second class honours degree in Chemistry, Electrical & Electronic Engineering, Physics or similar numerate discipline to join the School for 3 year fully funded PhD programmes for the PhD places below. Students with relevant MSc and MRes are also welcome to apply.

The closing date for applications is 20 August 2019.

PhD Scholarship in Whole Energy Systems

Description

This will be a fully funded studentship for an EU/UK applicant and presents an exciting opportunity to investigate smart local energy systems in the London Borough of Islington (LBI). LBI are committed to delivering a zero carbon budget by 2030 and low carbon smart systems involving integrated district heating/ cooling, renewable energy and electrical vehicles are intrinsic parts of the system.

This project will involve the investigation of smart energy systems with LBI and across Islington using techno-economic approaches. It will involve energy system modelling using software such as EnergyPro to enable the economic optimisation of heat, power and electric transport provision. Models will be developed and validated using data collected from existing buildings/ applications as well as knowledge of future energy scenarios for heat, power and mobility.  The successful candidate will work closely with the energy team in LBI and we anticipate that the results from the investigation will influence the development of a plan to deliver a zero carbon budget as well as the construction of new energy networks.  We encourage those with a desire to be part of the energy revolution, an interest and knowledge in whole systems engineering, low carbon technology and an aptitude for delivery to apply.

Supervisory team

The successful candidate will join a successful team working internationally in the area of heating and cooling. The supervisors of this project have successfully supported many PhDs to completion. The project will have support from the energy services team at LBI, ensuring the outputs of the project are relevant and have real world impact. Please feel free to contact Professor Graeme Maidment for an informal discussion and application.

Requirements

This presents an exciting opportunity to work on real life systems for reducing the impact of climate change in energy production. Applications are invited from UK/EU and overseas students with an interest in sustainability and energy, with/or expecting to obtain a first or upper second class honours degree in Engineering, Mathematics, Physics or similar numerate discipline to join the School of Engineering for 3 year fully funded PhD programmes for the PhD places below. Students with relevant MSc and MRes are also welcome to apply.

The closing date for applications is 20 August 2019.

Structure and timing of your degree

The formal output of these research degrees is normally a thesis or collection of written papers (depending on the programme of study). At the end of your degree you will be questioned on your written work and your research at your viva voce oral examination.

Your thesis will set the context of and current and past developments in your chosen research area. It explains your original ideas, the methodology you have selected, your evidence and analysis, and your review and final conclusions. Importantly, the thesis will set out your original contribution to knowledge, which is the basis for your degree. You will be guided by a supervisor or supervisory team who will support your development, provide technical expertise and challenge your thinking.

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

The PhD target timeline is three or five years to thesis submission - depending on whether you choose full or part-time – plus an additional year for assessment and ratification.

Professional Doctorate

A Professional Doctorate requires extra time for the initial taught modules in the first two years. Following these, the research element of the programme will take between three and five years until submission of your thesis.

Master by Research

The Master by Research programmes normally take between one to two years to thesis submission depending on whether you choose to study full-time or part-time.

Supporting your research

Our supportive systems at The London Doctoral Academy ensure you stay on track with your research project. Your progression is assessed at a series of six-monthly School Panel Reviews that act as a gateway for progression to the next six-month stage, forming an important part of the learning process for both students and supervisors.

This means gaps in knowledge, skills or research development are identified early, so there is time for you to improve and get support where needed. The Panels also give you practice in presenting and defending your research, so you can be confident you will perform well in the final viva voce examination.

 
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