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Sociology BSc (Hons)

Unistats

What is Unistats?

Key Information Set (KIS) Data is only gathered for undergraduate full-time courses. There are a number of reasons why this course does not have KIS data associated with it. For example, it may be a franchise course run at a partner college or a course designed for continuing professional development.

Overview

Sociology explores human societies, cultures and behaviour from a global perspective. You'll explore and analyse society's cultural diversity and construction of social identities based on sexuality, religion, race, gender and class.

6 reasons to study Sociology here

Fulfilling careers: Top.3 London modern for graduate prospects in Sociology (Guardian University Guide League Table, 2017)
Great teaching: No.2 London modern university for Research Intensity and Research Quality in Sociology (Guardian University Guide, 2017).
Industry relevant: Recent graduates are now research assistants, school student mentors and charity workers - careers are likely in teaching, social work, marketing, public administration, the voluntary sector, social research, journalism and programme research.
Overall excellence: No.2 in London Modern Universities for overall score and graduate prospects in Sociology (Complete University Guide League Table, 2018).
Academic progression: Graduates can apply for postgraduate courses, such as MSc Criminology and Social Research Methods, MSc Development Studies and MSc Refugee Studies.
Voluntary work placement scheme: Enrich your CV and your awareness of working practice with a voluntary placement in the prison service, legal advice, youth offending and youth mentoring schemes.

This degree course covers...

This course provides a stimulating and engaging exploration, from a global perspective, of human societies, cultures and behaviour. This course covers:

  • politics and democracy
  • wars and revolutions
  • gender
  • modernity
  • economy
  • equality and diversity
  • environment
  • genocide
Key course information - ordered by mode
Mode Duration Start date Location
Mode
Part-time
Duration
5 years
Start Date
September
Location
Southwark Campus
Mode
Full-time
Duration
3 years
Start Date
September
Location
Southwark Campus

Case studies

Modules

Methods of assessment for course overall: 72% coursework

Year 1

  • Revolutions, wars and the making of the modern world
    This module is an introduction to some of the major themes and events in modern world history. It begins with an examination of the Enlightenment and the French Revolution. It moves on to look at the Industrial Revolution, Empire and the extension of voting rights. It examines the First and Second World Wars and the ideologies of Fascism, Nazism and Soviet Communism.
  • Issues in contemporary sociology
    Issues in Contemporary Society covers key concepts in sociology and addresses issues such as migration,  race, gender and class. The focus throughout the module is how inequalities are reinforced through the changing nature of citizenship, sexualities, religion and mass media.
  • The sociological imagination
    You'll be introduced to some of the main questions raised about human societies.  The Module invites you to explore significant aspects of the origins and development of sociological inquiry within a historical context.  You'll be encouraged to read specifically selected pieces about key concepts and approaches to the study of social action in our societies.
  • Politics, decision-making and democracy
    In Politics, Decision Making and Democracy provides you with an introduction to the key institutions, issues and processes of British politics. It looks at the framework and the dynamics of the British system of government with a a focus on the nature of power and its impact on decision making and policy development. You will examine formal aspects of British politics including the role of political parties, the role of ideology and Key institutions such as Prime Minister and Cabinet.
  • Researching social life
    This module will introduce you to qualitative (with limited content related to quantitative) methods used by sociologists and other social scientists to conduct investigations. The module will look at a range of qualitative methods and different types and structures of data collected to illustrate how research works. In addition, lecture and other activities will demonstrate to students how to apply basic research methods and present results in a meaningful and informative way. In addition and primarily though the use of seminar reading, this module also aims to expose students to relevant critical issues which arise from carrying out research with a particular focus on issues related to race, gender, and class.
  • Social and political problems
    In this module sociology and politics students have an opportunity to explore how particular issues become identified as a social or a political problem.  Moreover they will be encouraged to explore how these problems are contested. In addition they will look at the implications of these problems for society and for politics.  Seminars and workshops will be used to develop students understanding of social and political problems but also to engage them in activities that develop key writing and study skills.

Year 2

  • Social research skills 1
    In the first half of this module students are introduced to basic issues in research design and methodology.  Topics covered include experimental design and random assignment, formulating research questions sampling and measurement.   In the second half of the module they learn the basics of statistical analysis and how to use SPSS.
  • Gender, difference and equality
    The aim of this Module is to chart this history and to explore some of the key contemporary debates around gender.  It will build on foundational work of feminist writers in challenging mainstream sociological thought and methodologies and then move on to examine issues of femininity, masculinity and gender difference in relation to the world of work, paid and unpaid, politics, social policy, the media and crime.  This Module addresses equality and diversity by focusing on the issue of gender difference and equality through the study of historical and contemporary debates on a range of topical issues reflecting diversity and equality issues in contemporary British society.
  • Making identities: citizenship, race and nation
    This module examines the processes that have shaped key facets of identity in contemporary societies. It does this by exploring modern sociological approaches to the analysis of three key identities, namely those based on citizenship, race and nation. We'll situate the origins and development of the study of these phenomena in the context of debates about the formation of social identities in modern states and societies. By taking notions such as citizenship, race and nation and examining their inter-relationship we'll provide a critical analysis of key sociological debates about the making of social and political identities. You'll explore important theoretical questions and debates and encourages you to think critically about their utility for the analysis of specific historical processes and contemporary situations. You'll be encouraged to think across the different boundaries of race and nation, gender and sexuality, as well as locality or environment in order to understand the different interrelationships between these forms of identity formation and citizenship in the modern world.
  • Social research skills 2
    This module introduces students to the basics of qualitative research methodologies.  Students learn about central philosophical questions in the philosophy of the social sciences and how they relate to the qualitative/quantitative distinction.  Students are taught a range of qualitative data collection techniques ranging from interviews to archival research.  They are also introduced to different qualitative analytic techniques.  Finally they are made aware of the ethical issues that are specific to qualitative research.  Students are taught through lectures and workshops where they apply the principles to specific research questions.
  • Social theory and modern society
    The scope of this course is designed to provide a grounding in the study of modernity and an understanding of some of the central assumptions of sociological thought developed during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Focusing first on some defining features of modernity, the course combines an examination of some key themes within classical sociological thought such as class, bureaucracy and order, before moving on to consider the relationship between such theorisation and a number of substantive areas of social research and debate. The central section of the course explores the role and meaning of modernist institutions and epistemologies through a case study of the Holocaust. The course concludes with a review of some current critiques of modernity.

Plus one optional module from:

  • Globalisation and development
    This module introduces key concepts, issues and theoretical debates in development studies. The module locates the debates and issues that it explores within both an historical and global context and encourages students to explore the inter-dependence of the developed and developing world.
  • Youth, crime and delinquency
    This module provides an overview of the development of youth crime as a specific area of criminological inquiry and a distinct jurisdiction within the criminal justice system. The Module considers the development of 'delinquency' as a specific field of intervention and investigation. It gives particular attention to the evolution of youth justice policies and examines current literature in relation to the strengths and limitations of the contemporary youth justice system.
  • The environment, sustainability and climate change
    The scope of this module is designed to provide a grounding in the study of the politics of environmental sustainability. The module focuses firstly on the debate on environmental sustainability which includes the challenge by environmentalists that it is a contradiction. It also covers the defining features of the concept before moving on to the first part of the module which aims to conceptualise and theorise the environment and sustainability. Alternative approaches will also be examined including green theory, the free market and Marxist approaches. The second part of the module looks at increasing global competition for water, food, energy and oil. The politics of climate change and deforestation; transport and tourism; global security and justice will also be covered. The third part of the course focuses on case studies of organisations and movements involved in environmental sustainability. It includes IPCC; Copenhagen Climate Council; the Fair Trade Movement; Ethical Consumerism and the Environmental Movement.

Year 3

  • Sociology for the 21st century
  • Race, culture and identity
  • Research project (double module)
  • Politics and protest: new social and political movements
    This course will examine forms of social and political conflict characteristic of contemporary western societies. The main focus will be on understanding social movements and forms of political contention in the changing social structure of these societies. Although it has a contemporary western focus the course will situate discussion also in the context of historical and comparative material on social movements. The emphasis throughout however will be on examining the ability of social and political theory to understand the nature of political identity and its expression in social movements.

Plus one optional module from:

  • Genocide and crimes against humanity
  • Equality, social justice and social policy
    This module will start by asking students to identify what they perceive as problems of discrimination, inequality or injustice.  Students will be asked to consider what knowledge and skills they will need to tackle such problems in relation to social welfare and employment. The module in part will be organised in response to the issues raised by students. In addition students will be exposed to different theoretical perspectives on equality, social justice and diversity, and explore some of the debates about, and criticism of the pursuit of equality, social justice, diversity and multiculturalism. A range of different equality and diversity initiatives in the areas of employment and service delivery will be covered. Finally the module will explore strategies: to identify inequalities and forms of discrimination; to monitor equality and diversity policies and practices; and to evaluate outcomes and 'success'.

Modules are assessed by essays, individual and group presentations, book reviews, examinations, reports, portfolios of work, document analysis, and final year dissertation.

Employability

Career opportunities

A sociology degree can lead you down many routes – it depends where your passion lies; possibly working to help people or marketing and business. A sociology degree gives you the freedom to choose any number of career paths. This degree will prepare you for a variety of careers, including teaching, social work, marketing, public administration, the voluntary sector, social research, public relations, advertising, management, and media-related work, including journalism and programme research.

However, it is the social and welfare profession, working as a social workers or a counsellor, which is probably the most popular career choice for sociology graduates.

Counsellors spend time with people, generally on a one-to-one basis, helping them to talk about themselves in a safe and confidential environment. Social workers help some of the most vulnerable people in society. Their role provides support and assistance to a host of individuals, families and groups, from the homeless to people with learning and physical disabilities.

The starting salary for full-time counsellors is usually around £19,000-£26,000 a year, although part-time and voluntary work is quite common. Private practice counsellors generally charge £30-£50 an hour. (National Careers Service)

Improving your employability

The course will enhance your employability through the employment skills components of many of the course modules, and through our thriving volunteering project which involves students in voluntary work in the police service, the prison service, legal advice, victim support, domestic violence and child abuse agencies, youth offending and youth mentoring schemes.
Recent graduates from this course have become Research Assistants, School Teachers, School Student Mentors, Charity Workers and Marketing Assistants.

Career progression

If you graduate from this course, you'll be able to apply for further study at postgraduate level, including for a place on our full-time or part-time MSc Refugee Studies,

The academic strength of this course means that you can also consider entering the field of academic research.

LSBU Employability Service

We are University of the Year for Graduate Employment - The Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2018

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search.

As an LSBU student you have access to the Employability Service and its resources during your time here and for two years after you graduate.

Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or a placement/internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the career you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

  • Direct engagement from employers who come in to network with students
  • Job Shop – daily drop in service to help with, tailoring CVs, cover letters and applications, sourcing online resource, mock interviews and general job searching. One to one appointments for further support also available
  • Mentoring and work shadowing schemes
  • Higher education achievement report - The HEAR is designed to encourage a more sophisticated approach to recording student achievement, which acknowledges fully the range of opportunities that LSBU offers to our students.
    It pulls into one certificate: Module grades, Course descriptions, Placements, LSBU verified extra-curricular activities
  • Employability workshops - delivered free to students all year round on a variety of related topics
  • Careers fairs throughout the year to really focus your thoughts on a career after university

Find out about any of these services by visiting our student employability page

Placements

Voluntary work placement scheme

In keeping with our applied approach to social and policy studies this Department has a strong voluntary work placement scheme. Our students have found their voluntary work experiences to be highly valuable. Through them they contribute to real world situations linked to their subject of interest. In many cases such involvement has enabled students to maintain a relationship with the organisation, by becoming a topic for their dissertation or a continued working relationship. Placements ground a student's experience, provide confidence and immeasurably bolster a CV.

The importance of a placement

Work placements are encouraged for Sociology and Politics students. Last year students successfully completed varying placements including working in Simon Hughes consistency office (Bermondsey and Old Southwark) and a placement at the European Parliament in Brussels. Academic staff actively develop their networks with external organisations to enable placement opportunities.

Our social policy students have taken up work placements at Chance UK (a unique early intervention mentoring organisation who provide adult volunteer mentors to work with children aged 5-11 years at risk of developing anti-social behaviour in later life); Kairos in Soho (a pan-London LGBT Community Development Organisation); the Naz project London (a sexual health organisation that works to mobilise Black and Minority Ethnic (BME) communities in relation to HIV and other sexual health concerns); Richmond Advice and Information on Disability (RAID); and Women's Royal Voluntary Service (WRVS) one of the UK's largest charities and voluntary organisations who aim to give older people the opportunity and choice to get more out of life.

Staff

Dr Caitriona Beaumont

School/Division: Law and Social Sciences / Social Sciences
Job title: Associate Professor in Social History; Director of Research, School of Law and Social Sciences

Caitriona's major research interests are in gender and history, voluntary action, Irish and British nineteenth and twentieth century social history, history of women's organisations and histories of the women's movement.


Dr Matthew Bond

School/Division: Law and Social Sciences / Social Sciences
Job title: Course Director, Sociology

Dr Matthew Bond is Senior Lecturer in the Department of Social Sciences and Course Director of the Sociology undergraduate programme.


Dr Jaya Gajparia

School/Division: Law and Social Sciences / Social Sciences
Job title: Course Director, Education for Sustainability; Lecturer in Sociology

Dr Jaya Gajparia is the Couse Director of the Masters programme in Education for Sustainability, an internationally recognised distance learning programme established in 1994. She also teaches on a variety of Undergraduate Sociology courses.


Dr Julien Morton

School/Division: Law and Social Sciences / Social Sciences
Job title: Senior Lecturer

Dr Morton is interested in philosophy of science and the theory of agency.


Dr Lisa Pine

School/Division: Law and Social Sciences / Social Sciences
Job title: Associate Professor

Dr Pine currently teaches modules on 'Revolutions, Wars and the Making of the Modern World', 'War and Social Change in the Twentieth Century' and 'Genocide and Crimes against Humanity'.


Dr Shaminder Takhar

School/Division: Law and Social Sciences / Social Sciences
Job title: Associate Professor in Sociology

Dr Shaminder Takhar is Associate Professor in Sociology specialising in race, gender, sexuality and social justice. She is the research ethics co-ordinator for the School of Law and Social Sciences.


Facilities

Teaching and learning

Study hours

Year 1 class contact time is typically 9 hours per week. In addition, you'll be expected to devote time to independent study and attend personal tutorials.

Research active academics

You'll be taught by research active academics whose work is nationally and internationally recognised and informs the course curriculum.

Online learning resources

We also provide extensive virtual learning resources with access to core texts whenever you need it. You'll be assigned a personal tutors to help you settle in, and a wide range of support is available through LSBU's student services.

100% of students agreed staff are good at explaining things 

National Student Survey 2015

Entry requirements

2018 Entry

  • A Level BCC or:
  • BTEC National Diploma MMM or:
  • Access to HE qualifications with 9 Distinctions and 36 Merits or:
  • Equivalent Level 3 qualifications worth 106 UCAS points
  • Applicants must hold 5 GCSEs A-C including Maths and English, or equivalent (reformed GCSEs grade 4 or above).

We welcome qualifications from around the world. English language qualifications for international students: IELTS score of 6.0 or Cambridge Proficiency or Advanced Grade C.

Visit UCAS for guidance on the 2018 tariff.

How to apply

International (non Home/EU) applicants should follow our international how to apply guide.

Instructions for Home/EU applicants
Mode Duration Start date Application code Application method
Mode
Part-time
Duration
5 years
Start date
September
Application code
4093
Application method
Mode
Full-time
Duration
3 years
Start date
September
Application code
L300
Application method

All full-time undergraduate students apply to the Universities and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) using the University's Institution Code L75. Full details of how to do this are supplied on our How to apply webpage for undergraduate students.

All part-time students should apply directly to London South Bank University and full details of how to do this are given on our undergraduate How to apply webpage.

Accommodation

Students should apply for accommodation at London South Bank University (LSBU) as soon as possible, once we have made an offer of a place on one of our academic courses. Read more about applying for accommodation at LSBU.

Finance

It's a good idea to think about how you'll pay university tuition and maintenance costs while you're still applying for a place to study. Remember – you don't need to wait for a confirmed place on a course to start applying for student finance. Read how to pay your fees as an undergraduate student.

Fees and funding

Fees are shown for new entrants to courses, for each individual year of a course, together with the total fee for all the years of a course. Continuing LSBU students should refer to the Finance section of our student portal, MyLSBU. Queries regarding fees should be directed to the Fees and Bursary Team on: +44 (0)20 7815 6181.

Full-time
The fee shown is for entry 2018/19.
UK/EU fee: £9250International fee: £13125
AOS/LSBU code: 4092Session code: 1FS00
Total course fee:
UK/EU £27750
International £39375

For more information, including how and when to pay, see our fees and funding section for undergraduate students.

Possible fee changes

Current regulatory proposals suggest that institutions will be permitted to increase fee levels in line with inflation up to a specified fee cap. Specifically, LSBU may be permitted to increase its fees for new and existing Home and EU undergraduate students from 2017/18 onwards. The University reserves the right to increase its fees in line with changes to legislation, regulation and any governmental guidance or decisions.

The fees for international students are reviewed annually, and additionally the University reserves the right to increase tuition fees in line with inflation up to 4 per cent.

Scholarships

We offer students considerable financial help through scholarships, bursaries, charitable funds, loans and other financial support. Many of our scholarships are given as direct tuition fee discounts and we encourage all eligible students to apply for our Access Bursary. New home full-time undergraduate students meeting eligibility criteria could receive a £1,000 cash bursary by joining us in the 2017/18 academic year. Find out more about all our scholarships and fee discounts for undergraduate students.

International students

As well as being potentially eligible for our undergraduate scholarships, International students can also benefit from a range of specialist scholarships. Find out more about International scholarships.

Please check your fee status and whether you are considered a home, EU or international student for fee-paying purposes by reading the UKCISA regulations.

Case studies

Select a case study and read about practical project work, students' placement experiences, research projects, alumni career achievements and what it’s really like to study here from the student perspective.

Prepare to start

We help our students prepare for university even before the semester starts. To find out when you should apply for your LSBU accommodation or student finance read the How to apply tab for this course.

Applicant Open Days

To help you and your family feel confident about your university choice we run Applicant Open Days. These are held at subject level so students start getting to know each other and the academic staff who will be teaching them. These events are for applicants only and as an applicant you would receive an email invitation to attend the relevant event for your subject.

Enrolment and Induction

Enrolment takes place before you start your course. On completing the process, new students formally join the University. Enrolment consists of two stages: online, and your face-to-face enrolment meeting. The online process is an online data gathering exercise that you will complete yourself, then you will be invited to your face-to-face enrolment meeting.

In September, applicants who have accepted an unconditional offer to study at LSBU will be sent details of induction, which is when they are welcomed to the University and their School. Induction helps you get the best out of your university experience, and makes sure you have all the tools to succeed in your studies.

Read more about Enrolment and Induction.

Getting started 

Students can prepare themselves for the course by reading one of the following texts or by informing themselves of developments in the news by reading quality newspapers or through news bulletins on television or radio.

Suggested reading list

It is valuable to do some preparatory reading for the course, we suggest: 

  • Macionis, J. and K. Plummer (2011) (5th edition)Sociology: a global introduction, Harlow: Prentice Hall. 
  • Fulcher, J. and J. Scott (2007) Sociology, Oxford: Oxford University Press. 
  • Giddens, A. (2009) (6th edition) Sociology, Cambridge: Polity Press
 
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Open Days and Events
Teaching excellence framework
Contact information

Course Enquiries - UK/EU

Tel: 0800 923 8888

Tel: +44 (0) 20 7815 6100

Get in touch

Course Enquiries - International

Tel: +44 (0) 20 7815 6189

Get in touch
 
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