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Occupational Therapy BSc (Hons)

Unistats

Key Information Set (KIS) Data is only gathered for undergraduate full-time courses. There are a number of reasons why this course does not have KIS data associated with it. For example, it may be a franchise course run at a partner college or a course designed for continuing professional development.

Overview

"Occupational therapy enables people to achieve health, well-being and life satisfaction through participation in occupation" (College of Occupational Therapists (COT) 2004).

"People shape, and are shaped by, their experiences and interactions with their environments. They create identity and meaning through what they do and have the capacity to transform themselves through premeditated and autonomous action" (COT).

"Occupational therapy is the assessment and treatment of physical and psychiatric conditions using specific activity to prevent disability and promote independent function in all aspects of daily life. Occupational therapists bring specialist knowledge and skills relating to the activities that people perform in their everyday and working lives. Their unique knowledge base on occupation and their distinctive skills mean that occupational therapy staff play a pivotal role to help people to carry out daily routines and tasks that maintain health, well-being and activity levels, providing vocational rehabilitation and enabling employees to remain at work by improving their work capabilities" (COT).

Occupational therapists work in a variety of traditional public sector or private sector settings (e.g. hospitals, schools, prisons, housing), or charities and voluntary organisations. There are now emerging roles appearing in non-traditional organisations such as banks, insurance companies and partnerships with built environment organisations.

This course provides an understanding of the science and artistry of occupational therapy. You should possess a keen interest in activity-based therapy, rehabilitation, good communication skills, and a desire to work with people to achieve their goals and promote independence.

LSBU will assist you in developing the skills for self-directed learning and, where applicable, will build on your prior learning and experience. Clinical placements provide opportunities for you to develop graduate key skills, as well as core occupational therapy skills and competencies. The course uses particular modes of teaching and learning to facilitate academic progression from novice to competent student practitioner.

There is also an in service part-time route specifically designed for students who are unable to access a full-time course in Occupational Therapy and who wish to remain in public sector (health or social care) employment whilst studying. This mode will run on a day-release basis two days a week. This mode will be funded by Health Education England. If you would like to study part-time but you're not working in health and social care, you'll need to arrange student finance or self-fund.

Accreditations

Key course information - ordered by mode
Mode Duration Start date
Mode
Part-time
Duration
4 years
Start Date
September
Mode
Full-time
Duration
3 years
Start Date
September

Case studies

Modules

Year 1

  • Introduction to occupation and occupational therapy
    This module introduces you to occupational therapy philosophy and theory and the scope of the profession will be explored. You will explore people's roles and relationships their engagement in occupation/activity within a range of environments including home, school, community. The module content will additionally introduce you to professional ethics and behaviour. 
  • Introduction to occupational performance and human function
    This module develops understanding of the healthy individual across the life span. You will explore people's roles and relationships and their engagement in occupation/activity. A developing understanding of relevant underpinning knowledge and theory such as: human development, psychosocial theories, anatomy and physiology. 
  • Assessment of occupational performance
    In this module the focus is on the assessment phase of the occupational therapy process. You will understand the concepts of assessment and the difference between standardised and non-standardised assessments. Occupational/activity analysis is introduced. Evidence based practice is introduced. 
  • Practice placement 1
    In this module the placement will foster an overall appreciation of the occupational therapy process, with an emphasis on the role of assessment. This placement gives you an opportunity to observe and engage with practice and aims to facilitate your understanding of the principles and processes of occupational therapy through experiential learning and engagement with clients in placement settings. You are expected to gain an appreciation of the effects of occupational disruption and occupational dysfunction, as well as engage with opportunities to observe the potential of well-planned intervention to ameliorate these effects. You will also be encouraged to reflect on the impact of different aspects of the environment on occupational performance. 
  • Enabling occupational performance and participation 1
    This module introduces you to a range of physical, mental health and learning disability conditions, their impact on occupational performance and the processes of problem identification and goal setting. This is considered within the philosophical and client-centred basis of occupational therapy. 

Year 2

  • Enabling occupational performance and participation 2
    This module will build on knowledge and skills gained from previous modules to develop knowledge and skills in the intervention planning and intervention strategies of the Occupational Therapy (OT) process. This module develops your knowledge of a range of conditions relevant to physical, learning disability and mental health fields of occupational therapy practice, with more emphasis on the child and adolescent. This knowledge development occurs in line with the philosophical and client-centred basis of occupational therapy. 
  • Practice placement 2
    This placement is designed to encourage the transition from novice student to advanced beginner student practitioner, developing the depth of your understanding and increasing competence in the application of the occupational therapy process. There is an increasing emphasis placed on intervention planning, interventions and evaluation of interventions, and the use of available evidence to guide clinical reasoning. It is envisaged that, at this level, you will demonstrate skills in problem solving, decision-making, use of theory in practice and an increasing awareness of the ethical considerations of professional practice. It is also expected that, at this level, you will begin to develop a tolerance of ambiguity in theory/practice issues. Practice Placement 2 consolidates the skills and knowledge acquired in Practice Placement 1 and facilitates you knowledge and understanding for the applied occupational therapy academic modules in Year 2. 
  • Enabling occupational performance and participation 3
    This module will build on knowledge and skills gained from previous modules to develop knowledge and skills in the implementation and evaluation of intervention in the Occupational Therapy process. This module further develops your knowledge of a range of conditions relevant to physical, learning disability and mental health of occupational therapy practice, with emphasis on the older adult. This knowledge is considered in the context of the philosophical and client-centred basis of occupational therapy. 
  • Advanced beginner student practitioner practice placement 3
    This placement is designed to encourage the transition from novice student to advanced beginner student practitioner, developing the depth of your understanding and increasing competence in the application of the occupational therapy process. There is an increasing emphasis placed on intervention planning, interventions and evaluation of interventions, and the use of available evidence to guide clinical reasoning. It is envisaged that, at this level, you will demonstrate skills in problem solving, decision-making, use of theory in practice and an increasing awareness of the ethical considerations of professional practice. It is also expected that, at this level, you will begin to develop a tolerance of ambiguity in theory/practice issues. 
  • Environment participation and long-term needs
    This module focuses on and develops understanding of environments/adaptation/productivity/long term conditions. The module will be delivered in the context of disability, inclusion, occupational identity and performance. 

Year 3

  • Outcomes and evaluation of occupational therapy
    This module explores the concepts, practice and importance of audit and of effectively measuring the outcomes of individual and group interventions and service provision. 
  • Contemporary practice of occupational therapy
    This module consolidates knowledge, skills and understanding related to the impact of influential external factors (e.g. changes in policy, demographics, and context) on the profession. The module prepares you for the complexities of a dynamic health and social care environment and considers ways to work with service users in order to develop an innovative and enduring OT provision. The development of professional identity will also be explored. 
  • Leadership and service innovation in occupational therapy
    This module supports development of knowledge and skills related to personal management, leadership, change processes and business principles for innovative OT provision. 
  • Competent student practitioner practice placement 4
    The final extended placement is preparing you to be competent to practice, by providing opportunity to make the transition from student to independent practitioner in occupational therapy. This level of placement requires you to demonstrate competence in implementing the whole occupational therapy process, including evaluation with a limited caseload. You will demonstrate skills in reasoning and problem solving and will be independent in professional judgement, whilst being committed to team endeavours. You will be able to explore service innovation and provision from a 'service' perspective as well as from the user and professional perspectives.
  • Application of evidence based practice
    This module will consolidate understanding and application of evidence based practice in health and social care. You will be expected to evidence inter-professional working skills gained in Years 1 and 2, by utilising those skills both in the workplace, and through learning sets in a process of peer review and support.

The part-time pathway will also cover these modules over a four year period.

Employability

Occupational therapy as a career

On graduating you are eligible to apply for registration as an occupational therapist with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC). This allows you to practice within the NHS, community services and local authorities, as well as the private sector. This course will equip you with the skills to work as an occupational therapist with both adults and children who have complex health and social needs.

Work sectors and salary

Occupational therapists work in a wide variety of settings, including hospitals, community facilities, schools, businesses, prisons and people's own homes. Starting salaries can range from £21,176-£27,625, although with professional advancement this can rise to £30,460-£40,157. (Prospects

 Career progression

As a graduate from this course, you will be able to apply for further study at postgraduate level. LSBU runs a part-time MSc Occupational Therapy course which is suitable for graduates with professional practice experience. To find out more about this course take a look our online CPPD prospectus.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

  • direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
  • Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
  • mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

Placements

Time spent on placement

During the course you will spend a third of your time involved in practice within a broad variety of healthcare and social care settings and the rest in academic study. A practice placement allows you to put theory into practice by working with a range of health professionals in clinical situations to develop the skills, knowledge, values and experience required to become a competent occupational therapist.  Although sometimes initially challenging, practice learning is one of the most interesting and exciting aspects of learning to be an occupational therapist.

You will complete over 1000 hours of placement; meeting the College of Occupational Therapists (2008) and the World Federation of Occupational Therapists (WFOT, 2002) requirements. The placements are full-time and are integrated into the curriculum in four blocks (the first three placements are seven weeks in length and the last is nine weeks). Over these four placements the practice placement facilitators on the programmes aim to provide you with the range of experience as outlined by WFOT (2002). You will therefore gain experience of working with:

  • People of different ages
  • Acute and long standing health needs (including physical, mental health and learning disability)
  • Services in a range of settings (hospital and community, urban and rural)

Practice settings

At LSBU, we work closely with a number of healthcare organisations to provide a wide range of suitable practice placements so that by the end of the course, you will have experienced healthcare provision that is wide ranging and is suitable for the chosen programme.  These placements take place across a variety of clinical settings such as NHS acute Trusts, community placements and the independent sector. You will go on placements within the Greater London area in the NHS, local authority, voluntary, social enterprise and private sectors. Placements can be in existing services as well as emerging services.

Structure of placements

The placements are developmental and occur at three levels, which match your development of knowledge and skills whilst you progress through the course:

  • The first, introductory, placement provides you with the opportunity to develop an understanding of the health and social care setting, what it means to be a professional and experience of assessment of occupational performance
  • The next two placements build on this by providing you with the ability to carry a caseload (plan and carry out assessment and intervention)
  • By the end of the final placement you will be able to demonstrate the ability to be competent to practice as a newly qualified occupational therapist (for example; be an autonomous practitioner able to integrate together theory, relevant legislation and agreed best practice to deliver a high quality service to your clients)

Supported on placements

Whilst on placement you are allocated to a named Practice Educator who facilitates your learning. At least once during each placement University staff will contact you and the Practice Educator to ensure that all procedures and support mechanisms are in place and working productively for your learning and achievement. 

Location

Practice learning opportunities will be arranged in a geographical location within the M25 area for all London sponsored or self-funding students.

Where an approved opportunity has arisen, students have been able to complete one placement, placement 2 or placement 3, abroad. However this is limited as a scrutiny process has to be undertaken to ensure the compatibility of the placement with the programme and eligibility for HCPC registration.

Staff

Musharrat Ahmed-Landeryou

School/Department: Health and Social Care / Allied Health Sciences
Job title: Senior Lecturer - Occupational Therapy

Cheryl Angell-Wells

School/Department: Health and Social Care / Allied Health Sciences
Job title: Senior Lecturer - Occupational Therapy

Sally Beckwith

School/Department: Health and Social Care / Allied Health Sciences
Job title: Senior Lecturer - Occupational Therapy

Anna Forte

School/Department: Health and Social Care / Allied Health Sciences
Job title: Senior Lecturer - Occupational Therapy

Sarah Maris-Shaw

School/Department: Health and Social Care / Allied Health Sciences
Job title: Senior Lecturer - Occupational Therapy

Ian Merrick

School/Department: Health and Social Care / Allied Health Sciences
Job title: Senior Lecturer - Occupational Therapy

Christine Peterson-McKinney

School/Department: Health and Social Care / Allied Health Sciences
Job title: Senior Lecturer - Occupational Therapy

Lynn Sumerfield-Mann

School/Department: Health and Social Care / Allied Health Sciences
Job title: Acting Head of Department of Allied Health Sciences

Helen Wheeler

School/Department: Health and Social Care / Allied Health Sciences
Job title: Senior Lecturer - Occupational Therapy

Facilities

Occupational Therapy Laboratories

We have three Occupational Therapy Laboratories, including an Art and Music skills laboratory, Splinting laboratory and Assisted Daily Living (ADL) laboratory. You will carry out a range of activities to practice your skills including using art, music and role play as intervention.  You will practice making hand splints using thermoplastic materials as well as anatomy practical's using anatomy models. The simulated kitchen, bathrooms and bedroom spaces are used to practice patient transfers, wheel chair manoeuvring and planning activities for intervention using activities from daily life. You also practice using a wide range of standardised assessment tools such as: assistive devices for dressing, kitchen work and mobility.

The laboratories enable you to practice problem identification, intervention planning, implementation, communication skills, risk assessments, problem solving skills and group work skills; all to learn how best to work with the patient.

Teaching and learning

Assessment methods

The programme features a range of assessment methods, including essays, presentations, critical evaluations and appraisal of research, exams, professional development profiles, reports and placement competencies.

Entry requirements

300 UCAS tariff points:

  • BBB or above at A Level or equivalent plus five GCSE's/equivalent (C or above) including English and Maths; or
  • BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma (formerly ND) DDM in a health-related subject plus five GCSE's/equivalent (C or above) including Maths and English; or
  • Open University degree or Foundation degree/diploma (or similar); or
  • International Baccalaureate (26 points) plus five GCSE's/equivalent (C or above) including Maths and English; or
  • NVQ Level 3 plus one year relevant experience plus five GCSE's/equivalent (C or above) including Maths and English; or
  • Pass in a recognised Access to Science, Access to Health, Access to Health and Social Care, or similar (60 credits of which 45 credits will be at Level 3 including 30 at Distinction grade, 15 at merit grade); plus
  • English and Maths GSCEs/equivalent (Grade C or above); or
  • A recognised equivalent.

Assessment and Interview

If you are shortlisted you will be invited to complete a literacy test and attend an interview. The interview panel consists of LSBU staff, lecturers, service users and clinicians. In addition to having your writing and grammar skill assessed, our interview will assess your ability to problem solve and reason.

We strongly encourage all applicants to identify and visit an occupational therapy department and liaise with an occupational therapist prior to interview.

English language

Those whom English is not their first language must achieve a minimum score of 7.0 overall or equivalent with not less than 7.0 in the listening and reading sections and not less than 7.0 in the writing and speaking sections for the International English Language Test Score (IELTS) at the time of application.

In-service part-time application

In addition to the specified entry requirements, part-time students should normally be working in the public sector or health and social care organisations. It is essential you have the full written support of the service manager and organisation. It is anticipated that you will maintain employment for the duration of the programme.

How to apply

Application instructions - ordered by mode
Mode Duration Start date Application code Application method
Mode
Part-time
Duration
4 years
Start date
September
Application code
2386
Application method
Mode
Full-time
Duration
3 years
Start date
September
Application code
B930
Application method

Full-time

All full-time undergraduate students apply to the Universities and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS). Full details of how to do this are supplied on our How to apply webpage for undergraduate students.

Part-time/In-service part-time 

Applications for the part-time route should be made directly to the programme team using the application form , equal opportunities form and the fees form

In-service applicants will also need to complete:

The Memorandum of partnership form, the Managers responsibilities letter and the Managers support form .

There are four stages to your application for occupational therapy:

  1. Full-time students apply through UCAS, and part-time students apply direct to LSBU using the forms above
  2. Write your personal statement and use this as a tool to illustrate why you are right for the course
  3. Prepare for your interview
  4. Complete the practice visit report for interview

Personal statements

Remember the personal statement is extremely important. This is essentially a selling tool on why you are right for the course. The personal statement is taken into consideration when shortlisting applicants for interview. Download our Personal Statement Guide (PDF File 155 KB).

Interviews

If you are shortlisted you will be invited to attend an interview. The interview panel consists of LSBU staff, lecturers, service users and clinicians. In addition to having your writing and grammar skills assessed, our interview will assess your ability to problem solve and reason. 

For the interview you will need some knowledge about occupational therapy and policies that govern working in healthcare. 

We strongly encourage all applicants to identify and visit an occupational therapy department and liaise with an occupational therapist prior to interview.

If successful in shortlisting you will be asked to complete the Occupational Therapy Clinical Visit Report and the Declaration of character and conduct form.

Download and read our Interview Guidance (PDF File 88 KB) to help you prepare for your interview.

You will also be asked to complete a Declaration of character and conduct form (PDF File 85 KB), which is a disclosure of any convictions you may have and bring this with you to your interview.

Practice visit

When you attend your interview you will need to have visited an Occupational Therapy Department to further understand the practice of occupational therapy for at least one day before your interview. Download the Occupational Therapy Clinical Visit Report Form (PDF File 145 KB), take it with you when you visit, ask the therapist to complete and sign it and bring the form to the interview.

Preliminary fee assessment

At your interview we start the process of checking your eligibility for NHS funding.

In order for us to ascertain your eligibility for NHS funding, download the Preliminary Fee Assessment Form, complete and bring it with you to the interview. Also, ensure you bring along your evidence as noted in the letter which will enable us to assess your residency status.

Fees and funding

Occupational Therapy LSBU - phase 1b

If you are attending a Nursing, Midwifery, Occupational Therapy, Therapeutic Radiography, Diagnostic Radiography or Operating Department Practice course and meet certain residency and eligibility criteria you will have your tuition fees paid in full by the NHS and you will normally receive an income assessed bursary from the NHS Business Services Authority (NHSBSA). The bursary is a grant intended to cover living costs and is non-repayable.

If you are an EU student you may be eligible to have your tuition fees paid but will not normally receive a bursary for living costs unless you satisfy certain residency conditions. The NHS Bursaries website provides further information about eligibility.

Find out more in the NHS Business Services Authority guide to NHS Student Bursaries (PDF 3.6MB).

The in-service part-time route of the BSc Occupational Therapy course is also eligible for funding if you're working in a health and social care setting and have the support of your organisation. If you would like to study the part-time route but are not working in health and social care, you'll have to arrange student finance or self-fund.

Support available for Home NHS funded students

The bursary and any supplementary allowances are paid into your bank account in 12 equal monthly instalments. They are not subject to income tax or national insurance.

How to apply for a bursary

When you have been offered an NHS funded place, the University will advise NHS Student Bursaries of the offer. Once this information is received, NHS Student Bursaries will send you a Bursary application pack, which you should complete fully (attaching all necessary supporting documentation) and return to NHS Student Bursaries as quickly as possible. If you fail to return the Bursary application form or do not provide all the necessary information, your Bursary award cannot be processed. On receipt of your completed application form by NHS Student Bursaries, your eligibility for a Bursary will be determined and the amount of your award assessed. On commencement of your training NHS Student Bursaries will send you a grant notification letter advising you of the level of your Bursary; the days of attendance taken into account; any parental or spouse contribution; and the method and frequency of payment.

NHS Student Bursaries,
Ridgway House,
Middlebrook,
Horwich,
Bolton,
BL6 6PQ
Tel: 0300 330 1345
Fax: 01253 774491
Email: nhsbsa.sbaccount@nhs.net

Who to notify if your circumstances change

It is your responsibility to inform your Faculty Office and NHS Student Bursaries of any change in your own or your family's financial circumstances by using the NHS Student bursaries change in circumstances form, so that if necessary your Bursary can be reassessed.

It is important that you inform NHS Student Bursaries immediately if you have to terminate or interrupt your studies before the normal completion date. If you abandon or suspend your studies your Bursary award will be recalculated based on the actual number of days in attendance and you will be required to repay any monies received that exceed your actual entitlement.

External links

Case studies

Select a case study and read about practical project work, student’s placement experiences, research projects, alumni career achievements and what it’s really like to study here from the student perspective.

Prepare to start

Occupational Therapy LSBU - phase 1b

The following information is for applicants once you have been successful at interview and have been offered a place on your chosen course.

Disclosure Barring Service (DBS) and Declaration of character and conduct form

You are required to complete a declaration at your interview and declare any previous convictions, cautions, warnings or reprimands. After the interview you will also be asked to complete a Disclosure Barring Service (DBS) (formerly known as the Criminal Records Bureau or CRB). Have a look at our Disclosure Barring Service (DBS) and Declaration of character and conduct information (PDF File 202 KB) to find out more.

To check the categories as identified by the DBS as being filtered and will therefore not be included in any criminal record certificate issued by the DBS look at the filtering rules for the criminal record check certificates.

Occupational health

You need to complete an occupational health assessment once you have been given an offer on a health and social care course. Download and read our Occupational Health Guidance (PDF File 98 KB) to find out more.

Download and print the following documents on vaccination guidelines and carefully read the guidance on the occupational health process:

You must take the GP vaccination and screening history form to your GP for them to complete, sign and stamp. This must be done prior to enrolment. This form also needs to be taken to the meeting with the occupational health nurse following enrolment in which the nurse can check immunisation status and confirm this for your placement. You should be aware that if you do not complete the occupational health process you will not be permitted on placement and this may jeopardise your continuation on your course.

Applicants who have met the conditions of an offer need to complete an online medical questionnaire. This will go to our current occupational health provider. Any delays in completing the medical questionnaire will delay enrolment.

You can email us at hscohdbs@lsbu.ac.uk with any questions in relation to occupational health clearance.

Accommodation

Students should apply for accommodation at London South Bank University (LSBU) as soon as possible, once we have made an offer of a place on one of our academic courses.

Read more about applying for accommodation at LSBU.

Enrolment and orientation

Once you have accepted your place to study at LSBU you'll be invited to join our Enrolment and Orientation process. Enrolment is the formal process where you officially become an LSBU student. Enrolment takes place during the very first days of the new academic year. On completing the enrolment process, some of which is online and some face-to-face on campus, new students formally join the University. You'll need to confirm your qualifications by showing all relevant certificates and prove your identity by showing your passport.

By early September, you will be given details about the time and location of your University orientation. This is when you will be welcomed to the University and your Faculty, and receive information about your course and the University's extensive services, so that you have all the essential information you need before your lectures and classes begin.

Read more about Enrolment and Orientation on MyLSBU, our student portal.

Holidays

You will receive fixed holiday periods, which will not follow the normal University timetable. Further details will be available upon commencement of the course.

Practice placements

Practical placements are provided under our contract with NHS Trusts and other organisations. On some health and social care courses you may find local arrangements require you to attend practical placements outside the normal work hours (evening, nights, weekends and bank holiday).

Uniform

If you are required to wear a uniform on placement and during some practical sessions in the skills laboratories you will be provided with two sets of uniforms following enrolment.

Changes

If you wish to change your address, change your personal details or withdraw your application, you must put this in writing to the Admissions Office who you can email at lsbuadmissions@lsbu.ac.uk.


 
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