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London and Global Cities MA

Overview

Cities and especially global(ising) cities are set to see their economic, cultural and environmental roles gain greater significance in the next decade or so. Many forums and coalitions recognise the importance of understanding, researching, managing, planning and coordinating the continued growth of cities worldwide.

London is already home to over 8 million people. Can it continue to provide a ready stream of quality housing for its inhabitants? To what extent do London's regenerated spaces meet the needs of London’s businesses and population? If these questions excite and intrigue you then this Masters-level course will be an excellent fit for you.

6 reasons to study here...

Located in the heart of central London: We use our distinctive location to investigate the societal challenges and processes facing global and globalising cities in the 21st century.
Taught by experienced academics and practitioners: Taught by staff with track records in research and relevant publications. Guest and visiting lecturers from professional practice supplement teaching throughout the course.
Site visits and live projects: One day and half-day site visits to exciting live projects - the practical focus is complimented by theoretical understanding.
Residential field study visit: Opportunity to participate in residential field study trips and site visits in Europe – at no additional charge to you.
Set the direction: Elective modules provide flexibility to explore issues relating to either planning, housing or tourism within an urban context of a globalising city.
Global perspective: Be part of an academic community dedicated to social justice and global responsibility - with inspiring schedule of guest speakers, events, volunteering opportunities and exchange of ideas.

This Masters covers...

Rather than seek to divide countries and their cities into categories such as developed and developing, we will deploy the concepts of the Global North and Global South, global and globalising cities. We then seek to explore themes such as urbanisation and climate change and the sustainability agenda and explore their impacts from different perspectives.

There is a sharpened focus worldwide on the importance of cities globally not just in political and economic terms but also regarding cultural and quality of life factors. The United Nations Human Settlements Programme’s (UN-Habitat) World Cities Report 2016 is just one of the latest examples of a multi-lateral agency stressing the global importance of cities and the opportunities and challenges they engender.

It's clear that the growing complexity of cities requires multi-disciplinary experts, city planners, managers, politicians and local activists who can grasp that complexity and work to fulfil the potential of cities while mitigating some of the more harmful impacts.

Key course information - ordered by mode
Mode Duration Start date Location
Mode
Full-time
Duration
12 months
Start Date
September
Location
Southwark Campus
Mode
Part-time
Duration
24 months
Start Date
September
Location
Southwark Campus

Modules

  • Cities in the Global South
    In this module we'll examine some of the global development processes that have resulted in the largest and most rapidly growing cities in the world being located in the Global South, primarily in Asia, Africa and Latin America. The nature and pace of this growth, the pressures and challenges this has created and some of the policy responses will be explored in depth throughout this module. We'll cover: the evolution of cities in global south and global north: similarities and differences in evolution, challenges and responses; evolving geographies of urban theory; post-colonial urban theory; concepts of urbanisation and development; impact of globalisation; economic, political and spatial transformation; social, economic and spatial polarisation within cities, community, society and identity; social and spatial hierarchies; urban impacts of climate change and resilience. Assessment:  5,000-word critically informed essay (100%).
  • Global governance and regeneration
    In this module we'll focus on contemporary governance and regeneration practices, which are taking place within an increasingly global context characterised to a large degree by increasingly neo-liberal agendas and practices. The module requires you to link theory to practice and to explore elements of governance and regeneration theory in a variety of geographical and political contexts. Indicative content: globalisation and neo-liberal perspectives; governance and regeneration theories and concepts; institutions and institutionalisation of global governance; internationalisation and policy mobility; contested spaces of globalisation and gentrification; diversity and distinctiveness; contemporary approaches to physical regeneration (property-led, culture-led, sports-led, flagship projects, mega-events and housing led regeneration); aspirational regeneration; good practice, problems and pitfalls; contemporary regeneration agendas, regeneration strategies and frameworks; local economic development; and rural regeneration. Assessment: Presentation (20%) on contemporary governance and regeneration practices and a Professional Report (80%) on contemporary governance and regeneration practices (3,000 words).
  • Smart cities in a global context
    In this module we'll explore the contested concept of smart cities in a global context looking at theoretical and conceptual ideas and case studies from around the world. Smart cities have been identified by policy makers as an important tool in addressing a range of issues such as climate change, sustainability, resource management, urbanisation, citizen engagement and social cohesion. We'll explore the complexities of these issues in detail along with the geographies of smart city innovation and potential tensions between the pursuit of smart cities within a neo-liberal urban governance context. Assessment: prepare a smart city strategy for a city of your choice with theoretical underpinning and evidence base demonstrating how and why your strategy is place specific (5,000 words).
  • Global planning challenges
    In this module we compare and contrast key challenges facing spatial planners across a range of global settings and the extent to which both the challenges and the policy responses are mobile across international borders. We'll explore the nature and purpose of planning via cross-national comparisons and to draw out lessons for the mobility of policy and practice. We'll examine convergences and divergences in planning approaches and their underlying design concepts in selected countries drawn from the global south and north. You'll develop creative and credible thinking over the kinds of responses spatial planning can produce within different geographical contexts. Assessment: 5,000-word critically informed essay (100%).
  • Planning in London
    In this module we examine the planning context of London; as a World City, as a centre for financial industries, as a home to millions of people. This module is of particular interest to those who wish to study town planning in the UK, and to understand how a major city functions. We'll cover: the historical development of London: a review of the development of London and how this affects it today; the governance of London:  how London is governed, a comparison with other cities (UK and elsewhere); the role of London as a World City;London’s major industries;  London’s Transport Infrastructure; the sustainability of London; housing; and regeneration areas such as Kings Cross, Stratford and London’s Docklands. Assessment: 10 minute Powerpoint Presentation (25%) and a 4,000-word Essay (75%).
  • Dissertation
    The dissertation is the final module of the MA, undertaken by students across all postgraduate programmes within the Division of Urban Environment and Leisure Studies. Through a substantial piece of independent research you're required to demonstrate an understanding of the themes related to your specialism. You'll will submit a written piece of work of 12,000 words or equivalent. You'll be responsible for the selection and definition of your dissertation project, in discussion with staff. Research proposals will be discussed with your supervisor; feedback from supervisors will continue until final submission. This module allows us to consider the design and implementation of research. It frames research within a social science methodology, covering theoretical and practical issues through a series of lectures and seminars which focus on critically assessing methods and selecting and defending appropriate methods for particular research problems. Assessment: 12,000-word dissertation.

Plus one module from:

  • Sustainable places (including one week residential Euro study visit)
    This module examines sustainability issues and challenges and the initiatives and responses from spatial planning and related agencies, institutions and organisations in the context of a European field study visit. The module aims to provide students with a detailed knowledge and understanding of the different forces at work within a region or city context.  It will develop the students' understanding of sustainability issues and the impact of climate change; recognise the processes of change and identify issues and mechanisms that allow an area to develop to fulfil its potential as well as respond to environmental and related challenges. Assessment: a visual study in the form of a written report (3000 words) supported by an A1 poster (2000 words or equivalent).
  • City marketing (with field study visit)
    Cities, be they historic, seaside, regional or capital, are the power houses of the tourism and hospitality industry. They shape and are shaped by tourism and hospitality which has become a major economic driver and re-imaging agent of city governance agencies as they seek to re-invent their themselves in the new global order. This module seeks to explain the role of tourism and hospitality and the visitor economy in the modern city and to critically analyse this in relation to a number of theoretical perspectives. The module will equip you with a critical understanding of broader perspectives required to manage and market tourism in the modern city and inform city marketing strategies. Assessment: 5,000-word professional style city marketing plan.
  • Comparative housing (with field study visit)
    The module is designed to help you to develop an understanding of the strengths and limitations of cross national comparison in Housing Studies and apply these in a project. It involves a five day residential trip to Amsterdam. Assessment: a critical essay outlining the housing policy context for another EU country, to be decided in consultation with the unit coordinator (2,500 words); plus a project (using information gained during the study visit) identifying issues, problems, and solutions for housing in the Netherlands with reference lessons for UK policy.  This should concentrate on aspects of housing management or development (2,500 words).

Full-time mode

The full time mode of study involves 12 months study with 3 taught modules in each semester. In addition, the dissertation module runs over both semesters.

Year of Study

Semester 1

Semester 2

1

Planning in London, 20 Credits, compulsory

Global Planning Challenges and Responses, 20 Credits, compulsory

1

Cities in the Global South, 20 Credits, compulsory

Global Governance and Regeneration, 20 Credits, compulsory

1

Smart Cities, 20 Credits, compulsory

Sustainable Places and field study visit or Comparative Housing and field study visit or City Marketing and field study visit, 20 Credits, optional

1

Dissertation, 60 credits, compulsory

Dissertation, 60 credits, compulsory

Part-time mode

The part time mode involves 4 taught modules in Year 1, and 2 taught modules plus dissertation in year 2.

Year of Study

Semester 1

Semester 2

1

Planning in London, 20 Credits, compulsory

Global Planning Challenges and Responses, 20 Credits, compulsory

1

Cities in the Global South, 20 Credits, compulsory

Global Governance and Regeneration, 20 Credits, compulsory

2

Smart Cities, 20 Credits, compulsory

Sustainable Places and field study visit or Comparative Housing and field study visit or City Marketing and field study visit, 20 Credits, optional

2

Dissertation, 60 credits, compulsory

Dissertation, 60 credits, compulsory

Assessment

This will focus on tradition academic assessment such as critical essays but will also feature assessment by: professional reports, analytical posters. presentation using PowerPoint, field study essays.

Module Title

Assessment

Core 

Cities in the Global South

100% Coursework.

5000-word critically informed essay

Smart Cities in a Global Context

100% Coursework

Prepare a smart city strategy with theoretical underpinning and   evidence base demonstrating a critical awareness of the challenges and   opportunities (5000 words)

Global Governance and Regeneration

100% Coursework

CW1: Individual analytical    presentation  covering   governance issues (20%)

CW2: Critically informed Professional Report covering regeneration   issues (80%)

Planning in London

CW1: 10 minute PowerPoint Presentation (25%)

CW2: 4000-word Essay (75%)

Global Planning Challenges and Responses

100% Coursework

5000-word critically informed essay

Electives Choose one

Sustainable Places

(including one week residential Euro study visit)

100% Coursework.

a visual study in the form of a written report (3000 words)

supported by an A1 poster (2000 words or equivalent).

City Marketing

100% Coursework

5000-word professional style city marketing plan

Comparative Housing

100% Coursework

CW1 A critical essay outlining the housing policy context for   another EU country, to be decided in consultation with the unit co-ordinator  (2,500 words)

CW2 a project (using information gained during the study visit)   identifying issues, problems, and solutions for housing in the Netherlands   with reference lessons for UK policy.    This should concentrate on aspects of housing management or development (2,500 words)

Dissertation

100% Coursework

The requirement is for student-centred coursework in the form of a research-based dissertation of 12,000 plus or minus 10%.

Employability

It's clear that the growing complexity of cities requires multi-disciplinary experts, city planners, managers, politicians and local activists who can grasp that complexity and work to fulfil the potential of cities while mitigating some of the more harmful impacts.

We expect graduates to find career opportunities in: city management , town centre management, infrastructure provision and management, urban strategic planning, smart city initiatives and urban policy.

In addition global cities themselves, (especially London) as identified in the Knight Frank (2016) Global Cities Report will see their populations continue to increase creating even more demands for professionals who can work to secure coordination in the provision of housing, transport and services. They will require talented and well educated graduates across the sector mentioned above and in the emerging sector of smart cities.

Each module statement specifies clearly the key employability aspects associated with the module. Here we demonstrate how employability relates to specific sectors and career opportunities.

The Urban, Environment and Leisure Division has a near 50 year tradition of providing our graduates with a range of career opportunities in a variety of sectors such as: central government, local government, the private sector, the voluntary sector, the self-employed sector and the university/research sector.

We expect a proportion of our MA LGC graduates will go on to PhD level study and they will be well equipped to do so. In addition our graduates do from time to time find employment in with professional bodies and quangos.

Cities worldwide face a number of challenges and offer a variety of opportunities and their complexity and pace of change requires knowledgeable and confident professionals who can tackle the many issues facing cities around the world.

Personal and professional growth

You'll have plentiful opportunities to develop outside of the classroom too. Including opportunities to: become a course rep or university ambassador; join professional bodies (such as, the RTPI and Tourism Society); attend career fairs; attend public lectures at in relevant university departments across London; set up and run an LSBU Global Cities society; attend UELS guest speaker programmes and research seminars; join and be active participants in voluntary and amenity groups relevant to aspects of geography e.g. BIDS, London Wildlife Trust, Homeless Charities etc.

Personal Developing Plan

PDP is a structured and supported process undertaken by an individual to reflect upon their own learning, performance and/or achievement and to plan for their personal education and career development.

The main aims of PDP are, therefore, to help you to:

  • Become more a effective, independent and confident self-directed learner
  • Understand how you are learning and relate their learning to a wider context
  • Improve your general skills for study and career management
  • Articulate your personal, education and career development goals
  • Evaluate your progress towards the achievement of your goals
  • Develop a positive attitude to learning throughout life.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

  • direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
  • Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
  • mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

Placements

Timetable

Staff

Neil Adams

School/Division: Law and Social Sciences / Urban, Environment and Leisure Studies
Job title: Course Director - BA Urban & Environmental Planning

Neil has extensive experience in international research and consultancy, focusing on European spatial planning and rural and regional development, with a particular focus on Central and Eastern Europe.


Dr Michael Leary-Owhin

School/Division: Law and Social Sciences / Urban, Environment and Leisure Studies
Job title: Course Director - MA Planning, Policy and Practice

Dr Leary-Owhin's interest is in the production of urban public space and he has studied Manchester's 'regeneration' since the 1970s as well as international urban regeneration focusing on Lowell MA and Vancouver. His recent publications include: Exploring the production of urban space: Differential space in three post-industrial cities and The Routledge Companion to Urban Regeneration.


Dr Philip Pinch

School/Division: Law and Social Sciences / Urban, Environment and Leisure Studies
Job title: Associate Professor: Human Geography

Phil is an Associate Professor in Human Geography within the Division of Urban, Environment and Leisure Studies. His research interests include moto-mobilities, the politics of sustainable design, and European spatial planning.


Dr Yvonne Robinson

School/Division: Law and Social Sciences / Social Sciences
Job title: Senior Research Fellow

Dr Yvonne Robinson has a broad range of research and publication interests including children and young people, education, race, ethnicity and the arts.


Dr Duncan Tyler

School/Division: Law and Social Sciences / Urban, Environment and Leisure Studies
Job title: Head of the Division of Urban Environment and Leisure Studies

Duncan teaches research methods, tourism enterprise, destination management, city marketing and tourism policy. In addition to being Head of Division, Duncan is responsible for promoting research, external liaison and collaborations, is Vice Chair of the Association for Tourism in Higher Education and adviser to two awarding bodies.


Alan Winter

School/Division: Law and Social Sciences / Urban, Environment and Leisure Studies
Job title: Associate Professor: Housing

Alan teaches on housing association governance, social welfare, social and housing policy, sustainability and European housing. He previously worked in local authority housing departments.


Facilities

Teaching and learning

You'll be taught by experienced academics with wide-ranging research interests, including:

  • Regeneration and restructuring of post-industrial Cities and economies
  • Comparative urban regeneration
  • The creation of urban public space
  • City marketing
  • Planning cultures and practices in post-socialist countries
  • Social, economic and territorial cohesion in Europe
  • Urban Agriculture
  • Development along the Thames corridor
  • Mobilising design
  • Sustainability of the Utility Furniture Movement
  • Sustainability education for Housing managers.

Most recently, Dr Michael Leary-Owhin, was interviewed as an expert in urban spaces by Global News in response to the London attacks. You can watch and read the news story here.

Assessments

The range of coursework assignments used to assess knowledge and understanding are diverse including: essays, reports, oral presentations, poster presentations, group work exercises, debates, data analysis (statistical, graphic and textual), laboratory work, field reports, GIS and mapping, research proposals and applied project work.

Entry requirements

In order to be considered for entry to the course(s) applicants will be required to have the following qualifications:

  • At least a UK 2:2 undergraduate degree or overseas equivalent, although priority will be given to applicants with an upper class second or first. All disciplines are acceptable in line with the LSBU objectives of widening participation.
  • International students additionally require an English Language qualification, with an IELTS score of 6.5, or equivalent.

How to apply

International (non Home/EU) applicants should follow our international how to apply guide.

Instructions for Home/EU applicants
Mode Duration Start date Application code Application method
Mode
Full-time
Duration
12 months
Start date
September
Application code
P060139
Application method
Mode
Part-time
Duration
24 months
Start date
September
Application code
P060139
Application method

Full-time/part-time postgraduate students and research students apply through the UK Postgraduate and Statistical Service (UKPASS). Full details of how to do this are supplied on our How to apply section for postgraduate students and our How to apply section for research students.

Postgraduate applicants are required to provide up to two references as part of their application.

Accommodation

Students should apply for accommodation at London South Bank University (LSBU) as soon as possible, once we have made an offer of a place on one of our academic courses. Read more about applying for accommodation at LSBU.

Finance

It's a good idea to think about how you'll pay university tuition and maintenance costs while you're still applying for a place to study. Remember – you don't need to wait for a confirmed place on a course to start applying for student finance. Read how to pay your fees as a postgraduate student.

Postgraduate Application Service

Book a session with one of our specialist Postgraduate Advisors. Over a one on one Advice Session they'll advise you on postgraduate degrees at LSBU that match your interests and experience. Book an Advice Session.

Fees and funding

Fees are shown for new entrants to courses, for each individual year of a course, together with the total fee for all the years of a course. Continuing LSBU students should refer to the Finance section of our student portal, MyLSBU. Queries regarding fees should be directed to the Fees and Bursary Team on: +44 (0)20 7815 6181.

Full-time
Part-time
The fee shown is for entry 2017/18.
UK/EU fee: £7100.00International fee: £12500.00
AOS/LSBU code: 4855Session code: 1FS00
The fee shown is for entry 2017/18.
UK/EU fee: £3155.56International fee: £5555.56
AOS/LSBU code: 4856Session code: 1PS00
Total course fee:
UK/EU £7100.00
International £12500.00

For more information, including how and when to pay, see our fees and funding section for postgraduate students.

Possible fee changes

Current regulatory proposals suggest that institutions will be permitted to increase fee levels in line with inflation up to a specified fee cap. Specifically, LSBU may be permitted to increase its fees for new and existing Home and EU students from 2017/18 onwards. The University reserves the right to increase its fees in line with changes to legislation, regulation and any governmental guidance or decisions.

The fees for international students are reviewed annually, and additionally the University reserves the right to increase tuition fees in line with inflation up to 4 per cent.

Postgraduate loan (PGL) for Masters study

At the current time, no details have been published regarding the Postgraduate Loan Scheme for 2017/18. The arrangements for 2016/17 are shown as a guide, but should not be relied upon. Details will be updated as soon as they are published by Student Finance England.

If you are starting a postgraduate course, studying for a Masters-level qualification either full- or part-time from 1 August, you may be entitled to apply for a £10,000 postgraduate study loan. Find out more at our postgraduate fees and funding section.

Postgraduate Advice Service

You are invited to book a one-to-one appointment with one of our Postgraduate Advisors. They offer a 30 minute face-to-face session where you can get tailored advice on fees and funding. Book a 1-2-1 Advice Session.

Scholarships

We offer students considerable financial help through scholarships, bursaries, charitable funds, loans and other financial support. Many of our scholarships are given as direct Tuition Fee discounts.

Overview of scholarships and fee discounts for postgraduate students. Key scholarships and discounts below.

Vice-Chancellor Scholarships

Students holding an offer of a place on a postgraduate course will be invited to apply for a Vice-Chancellor Scholarships.

LSBU Graduate Loyalty Scheme

This scheme gives eligible undergraduate students and alumni a discount of their taught postgraduate tuition fees when they enrol on one of our postgraduate taught courses starting this year. Read more about the Graduate Loyalty Scheme.

International students

As well as being potentially eligible for our undergraduate scholarships, International students can also benefit from a range of specialist scholarships. Find out more about International scholarships.

Please check your fee status and whether you are considered a home, EU or international student for fee-paying purposes by reading the UKCISA regulations.

Case studies

Select a case study and read about practical project work, students' placement experiences, research projects, alumni career achievements and what it’s really like to study here from the student perspective.

Prepare to start

We help our students prepare for university even before the semester starts. To find out when you should apply for your LSBU accommodation or student finance read How to apply tab for this course.

Enrolment and Induction

Enrolment takes place before you start your course. On completing the process, new students formally join the University. Enrolment consists of two stages: online, and your face-to-face enrolment meeting. The online process is an online data gathering exercise that you will complete yourself, then you will be invited to your face-to-face enrolment meeting.

At LSBU, you will be required to provide:

  • Original proof of all of your existing qualifications related to your course offer at LSBU. For example, original A-Level certificates or original Degree certificate.
  • Details of how you will pay your tuition fees if you are funded via Student Finance England or another sponsor, or payment if you are self-funded.
  • Two original forms of ID which show your full name and date of birth and immigration status. For example your passport or birth certificate. Please note some applicants will be required to show additional evidence to verify your immigration status.

In September, applicants who have accepted an unconditional offer to study at LSBU will be sent details of induction, which is when they are welcomed to the University and their School. Induction helps you get the best out of your university experience, and makes sure you have all the tools to succeed in your studies.

Read more about Enrolment and Induction on MyLSBU, our student portal.

 
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This course is still open for 2017 to international applicants
Contact information

Course Enquiries - UK/EU

Tel: 0800 923 8888

Tel: +44 (0) 20 7815 6100

Get in touch

Course Enquiries - International

Tel: +44 (0) 20 7815 6189

Get in touch
 
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