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Journalism BA (Hons)

Unistats

What is Unistats?

Key Information Set (KIS) Data is only gathered for undergraduate full-time courses. There are a number of reasons why this course does not have KIS data associated with it. For example, it may be a franchise course run at a partner college or a course designed for continuing professional development.

Overview

More than writing

Journalism is more than writing: photography, video making and sound engineering all play a major role in developing engaging multimedia content. This course builds the technical and critical skills essential for a career in the contemporary environment.

We offer the opportunity for all undergraduate Home/EU students to undertake a work placement, internship or work experience while studying a full-time course starting in September 2019.

Why Journalism at LSBU?

Top 3 amongst London competitors for student voice in Journalism (National Student Survey 2018).

No. 1 London modern university for student satisfaction in Communication and Media Studies (Complete University Guide 2019).
We host Journalism.London, a student-led content platform for you to publish videos, audio and written news and features as well as social media and live streaming.
Our academics have worked professionally in the journalistic and television industries; our guest lecturers are at the forefront of contemporary journalism.
Facilities include multi-million pound Elephant Studios, including news rooms, sound booths and editing suites to become fully immersed in the field.
Past students have secured placements at: the BBC, ITV, London Live, Reuters, the Guardian, the Daily Mail, the Evening Standard, The Sunday Times, The Daily Telegraph, Time Out and The Independent.
We’re short walk to the Southbank Centre, National Theatre, BFI IMAX, Tate Modern, Royal Festival Hall, The Old Vic Theatre, and The Young Vic.

journalism.london broadcast

Preparing for the live YouTube broadcasts as part of Journalism.London was one of the best parts of the course. Working behind the scenes in a live environment requires a high level of professionalism and co-operation.

Natalie Da Silva, BA (Hons) Journalism (2016)

If you're interested in animation, app development, interactive media or graphic design, our BA (Hons) Digital Design focuses on delivering creative skills essential for work in these exciting and expanding career pathways.

Key course information - ordered by mode
Mode Duration Start date Location
Mode
Full-time
Duration
3 years
Start Date
September
Location
Southwark Campus

Case studies

Modules

All modules are assessed by one or more of the following: project work accompanied by a critical commentary, timed assignments, production of magazines/broadcast bulletins/websites, work attachments (recorded and evaluated), internships and work placements, production of portfolios of work, presentations to seminars, presentations of projects for peer review, examination, essays, and a dissertation.

You'll learn the traditional tools of journalism, including researching, writing, proof-reading, sub editing and designing/layout pages for both print and online publications.

Web skills are central to the course – you'll carry out a range of multimedia tasks (including photo, audio and video reporting), assemble audio/visual material in multi-layered storytelling formats, curate material online in the most creative ways, and develop a basic understanding of web development and coding.

Methods of assessment for course overall: 89% coursework.

Publish videos, audio and written news and features

From the beginning of the degree you’ll be treated as a professional journalist. Your work will be uploaded to the student news platform (lsbu-multimedia-journalists.co.uk), designed as a starting platform for your work. Articles will cover a range of topics from around London. You'll source stories, provide your own images and design layouts.

In your third year, your work will be featured on journalism.london, an impressive collection of student pieces and a platform to publish videos, news and features. You'll build from your experiences in the first and second year to create and contribute to a legitimate Journalism website.

Year 1

  • Journalism foundations
    This module offers a practical understanding of the essential journalistic practices. It provides an introduction to journalistic research, storytelling and writing techniques alongside an introduction to the practical application of media law and ethical practice and civics.  Specifically, the module will cover finding stories in an identified ‘patch’ or postal code location, writing skills, information gathering, news reporting, dealing with contributors and interviewing skills. You’ll become familiar with different writing techniques employed in news reporting and feature writing across multiple platforms and media. You’ll also become proficient in journalistic interviewing and research skills. Assessment: PORTFOLIO: two 200-word news stories and one 500-word profile (80%); and PROFESSIONAL CONDUCT: submit a workbook covering the stories submitted for the Portfolio including research, sources, issues and processes. Attendance and punctuality will also be assessed as part of the professional conduct element (20%).
  • Digital journalism 1
    The aims of this module are: to promote comprehension of the impact of the internet and social media on newsgathering and writing; to enable you to develop basic skills in creating and launching a website, writing for the web, uploading content online, visual thinking and using relevant digital tools to engage audiences online; to encourage cross year collaboration on content for the course site http://journalism.london (specifically by writing reviews). Assessment: WordPress website with three event reviews (50%), online test covering creating a website/content online and basic WordPress coding (30%), and professional conduct through a workbook covering the stories submitted for the website including research, sources, issues and processes. Attendance and punctuality will also be assessed (20%).
  • Journalism and society
    This module will explore the wider social and cultural contexts within which journalism is practiced in our society. The module will focus on issues such the development of the news media (press, radio, television and online); the role of journalism as a ‘public sphere’; the rise and fall of ‘objectivity’ as a professional ideal and its value for the public interest; the constraints within which journalists work, in terms of ownership, regulation and the relationship with the audience; and the emergence of new media and ‘citizen journalism’, and their implications for professional identity. These issues will be addressed by both reviewing the variety of ways in which journalism has been understood as an object of academic study and by critically evaluating how they affect news representation and discourse. Assessment: 1,500-word essay (100%).
  • Introduction to broadcast journalism
    This module will provide an introduction to the production techniques that are relevant for a range of multi-platform broadcast journalistic tasks.  It will equip you with the essential foundational technical skills needed for the rest of the degree. This will include creating and presenting simple news bulletins, and operating the radio studio and newsroom within ethical and legal frameworks. The module will give you grounding in the broader areas of production processes, including file management and technical work flow, studio/location safety, and the ethical and legal consequences of production work such as copyright, privacy, permissions and trespass plus relevant codes of practice. Finally, the module aims to introduce you to the essential skills that go hand-in-hand with content production - editorial planning, time management and teamwork. You’ll work across desks (such as entertainment, sports, business) and continue to develop your patches and sources. One-to-one voice training will also be delivered in line with BJTC requirements. Assessment: a portfolio consisting of a variety of broadcast outputs (80%), and a workbook covering the outputs submitted for the Portfolio including research, sources, issues and processes. Attendance and punctuality will also be assessed as part of the professional conduct element (20%).
  • Digital journalism 2
    This module builds on the skills and knowledge learnt in Semester 1 and continues to outline the range of digital skills that journalists are required to have. Specifically, this module aims to introduce you to the principles of data journalism and infographics, with an overview of the importance of design for clarity of understanding. The module will enable you to understand the importance of data for sources, train you in the language of design, enable you to think critically about visual representations of stories, and introduce you to the principles of typography and picture editing. Assessment: 500-word feature and infographic (80%),  and a workbook covering the outputs submitted for the Infographic including research, sources, issues and processes. Attendance and punctuality will also be assessed as part of the professional conduct element (20%).

Year 2

  • Cross platform journalism
    Building on your foundational year, you’ll produce your own TV, radio bulletins and online news. You’ll rotate across a range of newsroom functions and will undertake pre-production planning, scripting and timing contents of news items or bulletins and producing on and off-diary stories. You’ll therefore develop your voice and presentation skills. You’ll continue to work in editorial teams across the year producing, presenting and broadcasting your own local news bulletins. During news days you’ll have the opportunity to evaluate and reflect on your practice. In addition, the module aims to reflect upon practice through sessional debriefs and constructive criticism. You’ll also continue to work on the student multisite platform lsbu-multimedia-journalists.co.uk which feeds http://journalism.london (LSBU student news web portal).  Assessment: portfolio including one timed writing component and a minimum of three other stories (50%). And you'll be required to submit a critical explication of a news day including a legal, ethical and news values analysis. Attendance and punctuality will also be assessed as part of the professional conduct element, as will peer/tutor observations on news days (50%).
  • Journalism futures
    This module introduces you to a range of debates around the future of journalism as it goes online, interactive and mobile. It will enable you to examine digital journalism within a theoretical context to support any independent projects or research papers undertaken in your final year. It examines how technology has radically changed the way we receive and interact with news and current affairs, identifies what constitutes journalism in a global digital news culture, and provides theoretical underpinning for the upcoming module interactive journalism. Assessment: a 3,000-word essay.
  • Investigative journalism
    This module will focus on the techniques involved in writing for newspapers in general and in reporting and investigating a controversial topic (crime, corruption, a scandal, etc.). This unit will allow you to work on news or an investigative project while exposing a ‘real life’ alleged failure of justice. The unit will address the techniques required for both the research/investigation (surveillance techniques, going undercover, archive research, use of anonymous sources, analysis of documents, scientific analysis, social and legal issues, and the like) and the writing of a final news piece. The unit will also address the consequences of investigative journalism, for the individual and for the society as a whole. Assessment: One 1,500-word journalistic investigative feature (80%). And you'll be required to submit a full notebook with notes and sources clearly recorded. Attendance and punctuality will also be assessed as part of the professional conduct element (20%).
  • Cross platform journalism advanced
    This module will further develop your skills in a more advanced multiplatform setting through continuous weekly practice and feedback. You’ll practice your broadcast newsgathering skills through a series of workshop and practice news days. In addition, the module will require you to reflect upon practice through regular debriefs and constructive criticism. Workshops will focus on storytelling through interactive journalism techniques, and introduce novel forms such as newsgames. Assessment: portfolio including one interactive piece and one other story (50%). And you'll be required to submit a critical explication of a news day including a legal, ethical and news values analysis. Attendance and punctuality will also be assessed as part of the professional conduct element, as will peer/tutor observations on news days (50%).
  • Global journalism
    Global Journalism will take as its starting point the economic, cultural and political shifts that have taken place since the 1990s. The module will explore contemporary ideas about ‘the global’ and critically examine both the utopian and dystopian claims that have been made about global culture and technologies and the role of contemporary journalism.  The module will focus on a number of key debates in relation to developments in journalism; the nature of globalisation itself, the emergence of global civil society and citizen journalism and ideas of press freedom. The module will also include contemporary case studies of global news events and journalists’ role in reporting them. Assessment: 1,500-word critical analysis of a current global news story (50%), and a 1,500-word 'Country Report' - an in-depth focus on one country to which you will be travelling to report on story of international significance (50%).

Year 3

  • Work placement and professional identity
    You must identify and secure a journalism placement for 140 hours (approximately 20 days to be completed any time during the course up until Easter of the final year) that enables you to significantly develop your knowledge, skills and competencies. In addition to the placements you’ll be required to reflect upon the culture, conventions, practices, power hierarchies and representations of the organisation in which the work takes place. The focus will be on identifying what is happening in the chosen sector in terms of trends, issues, markets and your role in the organisation whilst on placement. The module also covers the creation and launch of professional portfolio websites to support your employability upon graduation. Assessment: Completion of placement, plus a  2,000 word placement report (30%), and the creation and launch of an external website (70%) housing all your best work completed over the course of the degree. The site will be assessed on the appropriateness for securing jobs and placements within the sector.
  • Media law and ethics
    This module consolidates the legal and regulatory concepts embedded in earlier modules. The module will deepen your understanding of the legal and social responsibilities incumbent on journalistic production in preparation for employment and real world context. The module aims to enable you to confidently make editorial and production decisions with careful consideration of the British legal and ethical boundaries in your work as a journalist. Assessment: completion of two 200-word court reports (50%), and a two-hour online Media Law exam, open book (50%).
  • Interactive journalism
    As the strategies of multimedia storytelling found on news organisations' digital platforms are becoming increasingly more sophisticated and as mobile devices overtake desktops and laptops as the primary way of accessing news online, understanding cross platform news consumption will be key to the success of journalists in newsrooms of the next decade – newsrooms where technology and editorial are convergent. This module will emphasise the fact that a platform can determine how a media consumer interacts with news and will allow you to explore the ways in which user engagement can be achieved through a number of methods including: live blogging, apps, news games and more. Assessment: One group project consisting of a complete multimedia factual package including audio, video and an interactive element, with a focus on mobile as a platform (70%). Students will be required to submit a detailed workbook explaining the process of completing the multimedia package. Attendance and punctuality will also be assessed as part of the professional conduct element, as will peer/tutor observations on news days (30%).
  • Journalism project (option)
    This module provides the platform to showcase your abilities with a practical piece of journalism. The module enables you to produce an individual piece of work in an area of your choice, resulting in an applied project demonstrating professional competencies and skills. A journalistic piece of work in negotiation with the supervisor (90% element) plus one reflective essay of 1,000 words evaluating the challenges of the journalistic piece of work (10% element).
  • Research paper (option)
    The final year research paper provides the opportunity for you to conduct original research in an area of your degree or field of interest. The research paper allows you to use any of the theories, topics and methods encountered on your course. You’ll manage your own learning under the guidance of an academic supervisor. Lectures will offer general advice and guidance on research methods and describe different ways of approaching and structuring the research paper. The way your own research paper is organised and structured is best decided in consultation with your supervisor. Assessment: a 6,000-word research paper of 6,000 words (100%).

Employability

During the course of your studies you'll gain professional exposure via work experience with leading media organisations, whether it be in sport, current affairs, fashion or wherever else you desire. Journalism is a notoriously difficult profession to break into, so gaining plenty of practical and professional experience is essential to securing a full-time paid position. Journalism.London will give you a working portfolio, real industry experience and provide you with a platform to show your skills. Recent graduates from this course have become Editorial Assistants, Junior Reporters and Freelance Journalists.

Our graduate employment record includes the following companies:

Dance music and the performing arts

AEG LiveArtsAdminBattersea Arts CentreBritish Youth OperaDonmar WarehouseEnglish National Opera, Geneva Dance Company, Gustav Mahler Youth Orchestra Vienna, Kali Theatre companyLive Art Development AgencyMariinsky Theatre St PetersburgMonteverdi Choir and OrchestraMusicians Benevolent FundRADA (Royal Academy of Dramatic Art), Ninja Tune, Riffi Theatre, Rose Theatre Kingston,  RoundhouseRoyal Albert HallRoyal Festival HallRoyal Scottish National OrchestraSadler's Wells and Universal Music.

Museums and galleries

Bankside GalleryDulwich Picture GalleryFoundling MuseumGasworks GalleryModern Art OxfordMuseum of LondonMuseum of Garden HistoryNational GalleryNational Portrait Gallery.

Art Museum and Tate Not-for-profit organisations, charities and local government

ChildlineThe Children's SocietyCoventry City Council Performing Arts ServiceEnergy Saving TrustGreat Ormond Street Children's Hospital,London Borough of HackneyLondon Borough of Lewisham.

Postgraduate study

If you graduate from this course, you'll be able to apply for further study at postgraduate level, including in PR, photojournalism, broadcast, magazine and marketing.

Employability Service

We are University of the Year for Graduate Employment for the second year in a row - The Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2018, 2019.

At LSBU, we want to set you up for a successful career. During your studies – and for two years after you graduate – you’ll have access to our Employability Service, which includes:

  • An online board where you can see a wide range of placements: part-time, full-time or voluntary. You can also drop in to see our Job Shop advisers, who are always available to help you take the next step in your search.
  • Our Careers Gym offering group workshops on CVs, interview techniques and finding work experience, as well as regular presentations from employers across a range of sectors.

Our Student Enterprise team can also help you start your own business and develop valuable entrepreneurial skills.

Placements

Staff

Dr Terri Daniels

School/Division: Arts and Creative Industries / Film and Media
Job title: Course Director: Media and Cultural Studies

Dr Terry Daniels is a Senior Lecturer in the School of Arts & Creative Industries, specialising in visual culture, research methods, and mediated representations of gender and ethnicity. Her research interests include representations of ethnicity in British television, and historical research using documents and archives.


Laura-Jane Filotrani

School/Division: Arts and Creative Industries / Film and Media; Arts and Performance; Creative Technologies
Job title: Course Director, BA (Hons) Journalism

Laura-Jane Filotrani is currently the course director of BA (Hons) Journalism. She comes from a background of consumer publications, trade papers, local news and the national press. She has worked cross-medium and cross-platform, and is an experienced website builder with the CMS WordPress.


Prof. Philip Hammond

School/Division: Arts and Creative Industries /
Job title: Professor of Media & Communications

Prof. Philip Hammond is Director of Research for the School of Arts & Creative Industries. He has published widely on representations of war and conflict in news, film and video games; post-Cold War international relations; and the politics of environmentalism.


Dr Donatella Maraschin

School/Division: Arts and Creative Industries / Creative Technologies
Job title: Senior Lecturer, BA Journalism

Dr Donatella Maraschin's current research addresses the latest developments in digital storytelling, with a particular interest in the immersive narrative strategies found in long-form digital journalistic formats and their influence on the formation and understanding of networked subjectivity.


Facilities

The radio studio and newsroom in LSBU Media Studios have been designed to recreate the working environment of national news organisations up and down the country.

Working on MACs using the full Adobe Creative Suite, you'll be exposed to a constant stream of news from 3, 42” screens running 24h hour news feeds from a variety of agencies, allowing you to monitor and respond to stories in a live environment.

  • Newsroom

    Newsroom

    The home of Journalism.London, our dedicated newsroom is fitted with 42" displays, an audio mixer, 8 line inputs and 80 channel mix, News Synergy Workstation and 15" Macbook laptops - all for student use.

  • Radio Studio and Control Room

    Radio Studio and Control Room

    Our Radio Studio is built for four people, each with their own Cardiod condernser microphone feeding into a Radio control room with a set of mixer decks for five channels of audio playback, live broadcasting tools and on-air indicators.

  • Mac Lab

    Mac Lab

    The Elephant Studios at LSBU Mac Lab is fitted with Quad-Core and Dual GPU MacPros, available for digital media workshops and unsupervised student work.

Teaching and learning

The course offers learning through lectures, seminars, tutorials and workshops run by academics and professional journalists, as well as access to the facilities and cultural institutions of Southbank.

Theory and practice

We foster the skills essential to both traditional journalism and new media (developing production competences in WordPress, Indesign, Adobe Premier, Audacity and Photoshop).

You'll develop your proficiency in research, writing, proof-reading, and sub-editing, as well as in producing audio, video and multimedia news packages.

You'll have the opportunity to work on both collaborative and individual projects to a high professional standard.

Percentage of time spent in different learning activities
Lectures and seminars Self-directed learning Work-based placement
Year 1 28% 72% 0%
Year 2 24% 72% 4%
Year 3 24% 72% 4%

Tutoring

As an undergraduate Arts and Creative Industries student, you will be allocated a named tutor during your first three weeks at LSBU.  The role of your tutor is to be your primary contact for academic and professional development support.

Your tutor will support you to get the most of your time at LSBU, providing advice and signposting to other sources of support in the University.

Your tutor should be the first person at the university that you speak to if you are having any difficulties that are affecting your work. These could be academic, financial, health-related or another type of problem.

You will have appointments with your tutor twice a semester for 30 minutes throughout your course.  You can contact your tutor for additional meetings or support by email or in class.

Entry requirements

2018 Tariff

  • A Level BCC or;
  • BTEC National Diploma MMM or;
  • Access to HE qualifications with 9 Distinctions 36 Merits or;
  • Equivalent level 3 qualifications worth 106 UCAS points
  • Applicants must hold 5 GCSEs A-C including Maths and English or equivalent (reformed GCSEs grade 4 or above)
  • We welcome qualifications from around the world. English language qualifications for international students: IELTS score of 6.0 or Cambridge Proficiency or Advanced Grade C.

How to apply

International students

International (non Home/EU) applicants should follow our international how to apply guide.

Instructions for Home/EU applicants
Mode Duration Start date Application code Application method
Mode
Full-time
Duration
3 years
Start date
September
Application code
P501
Application method

For full-time courses, please send your applications through the Universities and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) using our code L75. UCAS is the organisation responsible for managing applications to higher education courses in the UK.

For part-time courses, you can apply directly to the University.

For more details on how to apply (full-time and part-time) see our how to apply page.

Accommodation

Once we have made you an offer, you can apply for accommodation. You can rent from LSBU and you’ll deal directly with the university, not third party providers. That means we can guarantee you options to suit all budgets, with clear tenancy agreements and all-inclusive rents that include insurance for your personal belongings, internet access in each bedroom and on-site laundry facilities.

Or, if you’d rather rent privately, we can give you a list of landlords – just ask our Accommodation Service.

Read more about applying for accommodation at LSBU.

Finance

You don't need to wait for a confirmed place on a course to start applying for student finance. Read how to pay your fees as an undergraduate student.

Fees and funding

Fees are shown for new entrants to courses, for each individual year of a course, together with the total fee for all the years of a course. Continuing LSBU students should refer to the Finance section of our student portal, MyLSBU. Queries regarding fees should be directed to the Fees and Bursaries Team on: +44 (0)20 7815 6181.

Full-time
The fee shown is for entry 2018/19.
UK/EU fee: £9250International fee: £13125
AOS/LSBU code: 4643Session code: 1FS00
Total course fee:
UK/EU £27750
International £39375

For more information, including how and when to pay, see our fees and funding section for undergraduate students.

Please check your fee status and whether you are considered a home, EU or international student for fee-paying purposes by reading the UKCISA regulations.

Possible fee changes

The University reserves the right to increase its fees in line with changes to legislation, regulation and any government guidance or decisions.

The fees for international students are reviewed annually and the University reserves the right to increase the tuition fees in line with the RPIX measure of inflation up to 4 per cent.

Scholarships

We offer several types of fee reduction through our scholarships and bursaries. Find the full list and other useful information on our scholarships page.

Case studies

Select a case study and read about practical project work, students' placement experiences, research projects, alumni career achievements and what it’s really like to study here from the student perspective.

Prepare to start

Applicant events

After you’ve received your offer we’ll send you emails about events we run to help you prepare for your course.

Welcome Week

Before you start your course we’ll send you information on what you’ll need to do before you arrive and during your first few days on campus. You can read about the process on our Welcome Week pages.

Preparatory Reading List

  • Jones, J. and L. Salter (2012), Digital Journalism. London: Sage
  • Hammond, P. and A. Calcutt (2011) Journalism Studies: A Critical Introduction. London: Routledge

 
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Contact information

Course Enquiries - UK

Tel: 0800 923 8888

Get in touch

Course Enquiries - EU/International

Tel: +44 (0) 20 7815 6189

Get in touch
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