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Human Nutrition (Psychology) BSc (Hons)


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Key Information Set (KIS) Data is only gathered for undergraduate full-time courses. There are a number of reasons why this course does not have KIS data associated with it. For example, it may be a franchise course run at a partner college or a course designed for continuing professional development.


Food for thought

“You are what you eat”… are you interested in the power of food to prevent – and improve – poor health? Human nutrition is a fascinating area of science and this course will give you an understanding of the molecular and physiological basis of the relationship between diet and human health and wellbeing.

A student in a food science lab, where biochemistry and human nutrition studies take place

Why Human Nutrition at LSBU?

This course is accredited by the Association for Nutrition.
Our industry relevant course prepares you for the expanding biosciences industries in a variety of related fields.
Our staff members are experts in their respective fields.
Our dedicated facilities include product development labs with a sensory evaluation suite and an extensive compositional and analytical suite.
You'll have the option benefit from a work placement in your third year.
Key course information - ordered by mode
Mode Duration Start date Location
3 years
Start Date
Southwark Campus

Case studies


During the course, you’ll get the opportunity to study human health and wellbeing from diverse perspectives with nutrition as the central theme. Nutritionists now work in a wide variety of roles from molecular biology to population health initiatives. The course is assessed as 56% coursework.

Year 1

  • Scientific skills 
    This module will provide you with a foundation for the study of science at undergraduate level. The basis for the module will be the context, planning and execution of experimental work, along with analysis and presentation of experimental data. A substantial component of study will involve activities in effective written communication and the writing of laboratory reports in particular. Assessment method: 100% coursework.
  • Biology of the cell
    This is an introductory module providing a foundation for further studies in all areas of biology and biosciences. You'll be introduced to the cellular organisation of living organisms and you'll explore the organisation and functions of eukaryotic cells. You'll focus on the regulation of cellular homeostasis and metabolism, including the flow of energy and genetic information, cell death, renewal and differentiation and their relation to human health and disease. In addition, you'll be introduced to current research approaches and methods for studying cells and manipulating genes. Assessment method: 100% coursework.
  • Anatomy and physiology 
    This module will develop your knowledge and understanding in anatomical language and human anatomy of the musculoskeletal system, as well as the physical and chemical principles that underlie physiological functions and metabolic processes. The concept of integration and control in physiology will be developed, beginning with the study of cell membrane function and leading to an appreciation of human physiology through an understanding of systems. Assessment method: 100% coursework.
  • Introducing psychological approaches
    This module will introduce you to the study of psychology, first by discussing its conceptual underpinnings and historical development, then topics related to living in the world as biological, learning and feeling beings. The first part of the module will focus on the philosophical foundations of psychology, its status as a science and current identity, while the second part will deal with evolutionary theory and the relationship of the brain to behaviour. The third part will consider learning, and the fourth will analyse emotions from biological, psychological and social perspectives. The module will provide you with the knowledge-base necessary for advanced study, and also the development of skills relating to factual learning, i.e., accessing, organising, assimilating and revising information. This module will help you develop skills relating to MCQ assessments. Assessment method: 10% coursework, 90% exam.
  • Nutrition health and disease
    This module will familiarise you with the fundamental principles of human nutrition as a multidisciplinary perspective relating to human health and well-being. You'll explore key concepts of nutritional requirements, food chemistry, macro and micro-nutrient functions. You'll also explore the relationship of diet to health, with special reference to over and under nutrition states. You'll examine dietary recommendations for the maintenance of health and well-being, and you'll consider the assessment of food intake in this context. You'll review the factors determining food choice, and you'll explore the role of nutrition in the context of physical activity. Assessment method: 100% coursework.
  • Numerical methods for biosciences
    This module introduces one of the central principles of biosciences, that of quantitative measurements, their interpretation and analysis. The emphasis of this module is based around understanding the measurement process, the significance of the measurement units and the mathematical manipulation of the data obtained to produce results of use to the analyst. You'll develop the relevant mathematical skills needed to achieve this in conjunction with the introduction to selected analytical data processing software. The data will be derived from a variety of human, microbial and epidemiological experimental settings. On completion of this module you'll have gained knowledge of the main basic mathematical concepts and the use of software in the treatment and interpretation of the measured data. Assessment methods: 40% coursework, 60% exam.

Year 2

  • Human nutrition
    The science of human nutrition is a rapidly evolving discipline. This module will consolidate and expand on introductory concepts year 1. The breadth of the subject will be explored including perspectives from physiology, cell biology, epidemiology and public health. Applied aspects of the area will be introduced and the human being as the central subject emphasised. You'll foster an appreciation of the multidisciplinary nature of nutrition and gain practical experience of assessing nutritional status. Assessment methods: 40% coursework, 60% exam.
  • Public health
    Improving public health requires a multi-disciplinary and multi-professional approach in order to gain increased control over the determinants of health and well-being. In both developed and developing societies, an evidence-based approach to public health is of increasing importance. This module will give you insight into a variety of key concepts associated with the complex influences on human health and disease. It will emphasise an epidemiological approach and will critically evaluate strategies for disease prevention and management. You'll examine various modes and means of communication to diverse audiences. Assessment method: 100% coursework.
  • Research methods 
    This module is intended to develop your understanding of the research process in the area of applied human sciences. It will provide you with knowledge about main research principles and methodologies for data collection and analysis. You'll gain practical experience in developing a research proposal and analysing data with parametric and non-parametric statistical methods, using both MS Excel and IBM Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS). Assessment method: 100% coursework.
  • Food composition, properties and analysis
    This module builds on an understanding of the chemistry of biological molecules and applies these principles to explaining the nature, properties and behaviour of particular food macro-molecules. Specific components will be used for illustration, e.g. starch, lipids, proteins, pectin and fibre. The properties of many of these compounds can be influenced by functional chemicals called ‘food additives’. The determination of all of these components in foods is essential for declaring compositional, nutritional and labelling information, and therefore the module will include practical learning material explaining the methods of analysis. Proximate and sensory analysis will form the major aspect of the laboratory analysis. Assessment methods: 40% coursework, 60% exam.
  • Sports nutrition
    This module will develop your knowledge and understanding of the nutritional requirements of athletes and the metabolic responses and adaptations to acute and chronic exercise. In particular, it will focus on fuel utilisation during endurance, and explore the nutritional requirements of different ‘athlete types’. The module will also reference evidence supporting the use of nutritional strategies in optimising performance and training. Assessment method: 100% coursework.
  • Disease and immunity
    This module looks at various types of disease, including Infectious, congenital (genetic and acquired), degenerative, metabolic (endocrine and nutritional), immunological (auto immune, allergic, inflammatory) and nepotistic. The module also covers the basics of the immune system and diagnosis and therapy. Assessment method: 100% exam.

Year 3

  • Advanced topics in human nutrition
    Human nutritional science is a rapidly advancing discipline. This module will draw on your background knowledge in the area and encourage critical evaluation of emerging topics in the field. The emphasis will be on the available evidence base and developing skills in interpreting and relating key nutritional points from complex and varied sources of information. The module will be responsive to advances and breaking stories in the field. Assessment method: 100% coursework.
  • Clinical nutrition 
    Clinical nutrition encompasses the understanding of the role of diet in the causation, prevention and management of disease. This module will examine these themes through the examination of a range of disease states and associated nutritional perspectives. The module will also examine the role of nutrition in clinical science and the hospital setting. Assessment method: 40% coursework, 60% exam.
  • Aetiology of disease
    People are all prone to a huge range of disease states. Many are very rare, but others are extremely common and so are leading causes of death and suffering to humans. This module will describe and evaluate a range of common diseases and their treatment options and outcomes. The first half of the module will focus on infectious disease as caused by representative pathogens (bacterial, viral, protozoal and metazoan parasites). You'll critically analyse old and new infectious diseases in the light of modern developments in molecular microbiology. The organisation and running of a clinical laboratory will be described. A series of practicals will isolate and identify and serotype a food poisoning microbe. In the second half of the module the emphasis will shift to non infectious (neoplastic, autoimmune and hereditary) diseases, since these are the major causes of morbidity and mortality in Western populations. Assessment methods: 60% coursework, 40% exam.
  • Neuropsychology
    This module begins with an introduction to the history of neuropsychology and its methods designed to lay foundations for the following content. Of particular importance is the relationship between normal and impaired functioning and the goal of deriving theories that explain both. The content areas examine different types of neuropsychological impairment, from traumatic brain injury, as found in amnesic syndrome, through the effects of strokes found in unilateral neglect, to the pervasive effects of degenerative conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease. An important part of the module is an appraisal of the likelihood of recovery and efficacy of rehabilitation. Assessment methods: 40% coursework, 60% exam.
  • Project
    This project is an extended piece of work that requires you to undertake independent scientific research. The project is primarily a laboratory or fieldwork-based investigation. You'll be expected to manage your own research activity with tutorial support from your research supervisor. You'll use a project book as a record of research, and you'll be presenting your findings in form of a scientific paper that is assessed and subjected to a presentation and examination. Assessment method: 100% coursework.


Human nutrition is an increasingly important scientific area – and the rapidly expanding biosciences industries mean there are plenty of opportunities once you graduate. You might find a role in public health; pharmaceuticals; medical diagnostics; pathology; healthcare; food production or even environmental issues. You'll develop a wide range of employability skills with emphasis on a vocational approach to teaching. If you choose to take the (optional) sandwich year, gaining industrial/research experience, employment prospects further improve. Recent graduates from this course have gone onto roles in: public health nutrition; health promotion and health education; the food industry; the catering industry; and sports nutrition.

You might go on to be a dietician, who are experts in the science of nutrition. Using specialist knowledge they help educate people with health problems about the impact of their diet. Dietitians may actually diagnose and treat dietary-related illnesses and problems, often working one-to-one with clients. For this you’ll need interpersonal skills with the ability to connect with people from a variety of backgrounds in a non-judgemental manner. Many dietitian positions are available in the NHS, although there are career paths available within the food industry, sport, the media, education and research. There are also options for specialisation – such as working with children or diabetics.

Nutritionists, however, are slightly different to dietitians. They help advance understanding of how diet affects the health and well-being of people. The number of nutritionists has grown massively in the last decade.

If you graduate from this course, you’ll also be able to apply for further study at postgraduate level, including for a place on our full-time or part-time MSc Food Safety and Control. The academic strength of this course means that you can also consider entering the field of academic research. Graduates from this course have secured: pure research in Universities and Research Institutions (often leading to a higher degree); and applied research and development in the biological-based industries.

LSBU Employability Service

We are University of the Year for Graduate Employment - The Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2018

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search.

As an LSBU student you have access to the Employability Service and its resources during your time here and for two years after you graduate.

Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or a placement/internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the career you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

  • Direct engagement from employers who come in to network with students
  • Job Shop – daily drop in service to help with, tailoring CVs, cover letters and applications, sourcing online resource, mock interviews and general job searching. One to one appointments for further support also available
  • Mentoring and work shadowing schemes
  • Higher education achievement report - The HEAR is designed to encourage a more sophisticated approach to recording student achievement, which acknowledges fully the range of opportunities that LSBU offers to our students.
    It pulls into one certificate: Module grades, Course descriptions, Placements, LSBU verified extra-curricular activities
  • Employability workshops - delivered free to students all year round on a variety of related topics
  • Careers fairs throughout the year to really focus your thoughts on a career after university

Find out about any of these services by visiting our student employability page



Dr Adam Cunliffe

School/Division: Applied Sciences / Food Sciences (including the National Bakery School)
Job title: Associate Professor

Adam is a registered nutritionist with a background in physiology and clinical nutrition.


Teaching and learning

Percentage of time spent in different learning activities
Time spent in lectures, seminars and lab-based studySelf-directed learning
Year 134%66%
Year 229%71%
Year 323%77%

Entry requirements

2018 Entry

  • A Level CCD or;
  • BTEC National Diploma MMM or;
  • Access to HE qualifications with 39 Merits and 6 Passes including 12 credits in Science or;
  • Equivalent level 3 qualifications worth 96 UCAS points
  • Level 3 qualifications must include 2 Science subjects
  • Applicants must hold 5 GCSEs A-C including Maths and English or equivalent (reformed GCSEs grade 4 or above).
  • We welcome qualifications from around the world. English language qualifications for international students: IELTS score of 6.0 or Cambridge Proficiency or Advanced Grade C.

How to apply

International (non Home/EU) applicants should follow our international how to apply guide.

Instructions for Home/EU applicants
Mode Duration Start date Application code Application method
3 years
Start date
Application code
Application method

All full-time undergraduate students apply to the Universities and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) using the University's Institution Code L75. Full details of how to do this are supplied on our How to apply webpage for undergraduate students.

All part-time students should apply directly to London South Bank University and full details of how to do this are given on our undergraduate How to apply webpage.


Students should apply for accommodation at London South Bank University (LSBU) as soon as possible, once we have made an offer of a place on one of our academic courses. Read more about applying for accommodation at LSBU.


It's a good idea to think about how you'll pay university tuition and maintenance costs while you're still applying for a place to study. Remember – you don't need to wait for a confirmed place on a course to start applying for student finance. Read how to pay your fees as an undergraduate student.

Fees and funding

Fees are shown for new entrants to courses, for each individual year of a course, together with the total fee for all the years of a course. Continuing LSBU students should refer to the Finance section of our student portal, MyLSBU. Queries regarding fees should be directed to the Fees and Bursaries Team on: +44 (0)20 7815 6181.

The fee shown is for entry 2018/19.
UK/EU fee: £9250International fee: £13125
AOS/LSBU code: 5002Session code: 1FS00
Total course fee:
UK/EU £27750
International £39375

Fees are shown for new entrants to courses, for each individual year of a course, together with the total fee for all the years of a course. Continuing LSBU students should refer to the Finance section of our student portal, MyLSBU. Queries regarding fees should be directed to the Fees and Bursary Team on: +44 (0)20 7815 6181.

The fee shown is for 2017/18 entry.

Year of study UK/EU fee International fee
Year 1 Full-time  £9,250.00 £12,500.00
Year 2 Full-time  £9,250.00 £12,500.00
Year 3 Full-time  £9,250.00 £12,500.00
Total £27,750.00 £37,500.00

For more information, including how and when to pay, see our fees and funding section for undergraduate students.


We offer students considerable financial help through scholarships, bursaries, charitable funds, loans and other financial support. The majority of our scholarships are given as direct Tuition Fee discounts and we encourage all eligible students to apply for our National Scholarship Programme (NSP). The NSP features 100 full scholarships that exempt students from all Tuition Fees, and there are many more partial scholarships. Find out more about scholarships and fee discounts for undergraduate students.

Case studies

Select a case study and read about practical project work, students' placement experiences, research projects, alumni career achievements and what it’s really like to study here from the student perspective.

Prepare to start

We help our students prepare for university even before the semester starts. To find out when you should apply for your LSBU accommodation or student finance read the How to apply tab for this course.

Applicant Open Days

To help you and your family feel confident about your university choice we run Applicant Open Days. These are held at subject level so students start getting to know each other and the academic staff who will be teaching them. These events are for applicants only and as an applicant you would receive an email invitation to attend the relevant event for your subject.

Enrolment and Induction

Enrolment takes place before you start your course. On completing the process, new students formally join the University. Enrolment consists of two stages: online, and your face-to-face enrolment meeting. The online process is an online data gathering exercise that you will complete yourself, then you will be invited to your face-to-face enrolment meeting.

In September, applicants who have accepted an unconditional offer to study at LSBU will be sent details of induction, which is when they are welcomed to the University and their School. Induction helps you get the best out of your university experience, and makes sure you have all the tools to succeed in your studies.

Read more about Enrolment and Induction.

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Tel: 0800 923 8888

Tel: +44 (0) 20 7815 6100

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Course Enquiries - International

Tel: +44 (0) 20 7815 6189

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