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Criminology with Psychology BSc (Hons)

Unistats

What is Unistats?

Key Information Set (KIS) Data is only gathered for undergraduate full-time courses. There are a number of reasons why this course does not have KIS data associated with it. For example, it may be a franchise course run at a partner college or a course designed for continuing professional development.

Overview

Partners in crime

Why do people commit crimes? How does the criminal mind work? In a world increasingly fascinated by the nature of crime and justice, this degree offers a contemporary view of crime and criminal justice within the context of the scientific study of human thought and behaviour.

We provide the practical experience employers demand - career areas include: probation, policing, the prison service, NGOs, local authorities, the voluntary sector, youth offending teams, teaching, social work and administration.

We offer the opportunity for all undergraduate Home/EU students to undertake a work placement, internship or work experience while studying a full-time course starting in September 2019.

Why Criminology with Psychology at LSBU?

You'll be taught by research-active academics whose work is nationally and internationally recognised and informs the course curriculum.
No.2 London University overall in Criminology (Guardian League Table, 2018).
Our courses in this field provide the practical experience employers demand - career areas include: probation, policing, the prison service, NGOs, local authorities, the voluntary sector, youth offending teams, teaching, social work and administration.
Graduates can apply for postgraduate courses, such as MSc Criminology and Social Research Methods, MSc Development Studies and MSc Refugee Studies.
Be part of an academic community dedicated to social justice and global responsibility - with inspiring schedule of guest speakers, events, volunteering opportunities and exchange of ideas.
Enhance your employability by taking part in our volunteering programme which covers a range of criminal justice-related agencies.
Key course information - ordered by mode
Mode Duration Start date Location
Mode
Full-time
Duration
3 years
Start Date
September
Location
Southwark Campus

Stories

Modules

You'll have the opportunity to refine your cognitive, analytical, critical, and research skills, and to translate these into research practice in the field of criminology and psychology. This course covers:

  • criminal justice
  • psychological approaches
  • politics and policy
  • policing
  • social behaviours
  • penal theory and policy
  • youth crime
  • drugs and crime
  • genocide

Methods of assessment for course overall: 67% coursework.

Year 1

Semester 1

  • Introducing psychological approaches
    This module will introduce you to the study of psychology, first by discussing its conceptual underpinnings and historical development, then topics related to living in the world as biological, learning and feeling beings. The first part of the module will focus on the philosophical foundations of psychology, its status as a science and current identity, while the second part will deal with evolutionary theory and the relationship of the brain to behaviour. The third part will consider learning, and the fourth will analyse emotions from biological, psychological and social perspectives. The module will provides you with the knowledge-base necessary for advanced study at Level 5, and also the development of skills relating to factual learning, i.e., accessing, organising, assimilating and revising information. This module will help you develop skills relating to MCQ assessments. Assessment method: 10% coursework, 90% exam. 
  • Introduction to the criminal justice system
    This module introduces students to the different levels, agencies and operation of the criminal justice system. It presents the main institutions and provides an overview of the procedures and policies related to the contemporary criminal justice system and punishment of offenders. The module introduces a number of key issues and debates in relation to the effectiveness of the criminal justice system.
  • Deconstructing the crime problem
    What is crime? How and to what extent is the crime problem dispersed throughout contemporary society? What do we know about current levels of crime in the UK and how do these compare historically?  These are some of the key questions addressed in this module which aims to introduce students to the basic anatomy of the crime problem. In addition to addressing specific questions concerning trends in different types of crime and social distribution of crime across society, its main aim is to encourage students to think about these issues in terms of broader social trends and relations.

Semester 2

  • Issues in crime
    This module presents students with a range of distinct contemporary criminological issues and debates. It includes a range of topics and examines how fears and concerns about crime and the criminal justice system are related to issues such as governance, social exclusion and racial inequality. The module also enables students to explore varying explanations of crimes and crime control strategies.
  • Exploring psychological approaches
    This module introduces topics related to living in the world as a developing, thinking, social and individual being. Topics will include memory, perception, attention, cognitive development, interpersonal behaviour, group behaviour, intelligence, personality and aspects of atypical behaviour. Study in each of these areas will provide you with a framework for advanced study at Level 5. In addition to knowledge, the module will provide you with the opportunity to develop skills relating to accessing, assimilating and communicating information, and it will introduce you to a variety of assessment techniques that you'll encounter on the course. Assessment methods: 60% coursework, 40% exam.
  • Understanding crime: criminological theory in context
    In this module students will learn about the key underlying theories that shape criminology and how society thinks about crime.  We will examine the conceptual and practical differences between these schools and show how their differences have resulted in very different definitions of crime, types of research and governmental policy. We will also see how these different theories have shaped the criminal justice system of different societies. We will do all this within the broad historical context of the development of criminology.

Year 2

Semester 1

  • Understanding punishment: penal theory and practice
    This module examines penal theory and practice in a theoretical, comparative and historical way, and engages critically with the theoretical justifications and policy proposals for punishment. The module presents the juridical perspectives and rationales of punishment, historical and sociological explanations of punishment. The course also reflects on the race, class and gender bias in the penal system and critically discusses the concept of ‘crisis’ of the penal system as well as the issue of the privatisation of punishment.
  • The psychology of feelings
    This module will provide you with the opportunity to explore the interdependence between feelings and human behaviour. The module is organised into three distinct themes, relationships, mood and sensations. Two introductory sessions will be used to recap and consolidate material at Level 4 and provide a knowledge base upon which the rest of the module will build. Then, within each theme a range of topics will be explored, drawing on theory and research from biological, developmental, evolutionary, cross-cultural, cognitive and atypical psychology. Individual differences will be a key perspective in this module. Assessment method: 100% coursework.

Optional modules

  • Behind bars: prisons and society
    Imprisonment is one of the most common forms of punishment in Western liberal democracies, and it is one of the most controversial, especially as prison populations continue to grow at unprecedented levels. This module introduces students to contemporary issues and debates about imprisonment, such as prison conditions, overcrowding, staffing, prisoners’ rights. The module also explores the broader historical, social, political, and economic context of the modern prison and the ideology of imprisonment, including its representation in popular media.
  • Issues in criminal justice history
    This module provides a framework for examining the development of the criminal justice system and the general construction of the crime problem in the period from 1800s until the 1960s. It blends a discussion of institutional development with a socio-historical analysis of changing problems of crime. By examining criminological issues within a specific political, historical and intellectual context this module provides a valuable underpinning for a range of modules in the Criminology Degree programme in general and on the topics of policing, prisons, gender and crime, and youth crime in particular.
  • Policing and society
    The module will seek to create a critical understanding of historical, social and contemporary problems and debates in the development of modern policing, with specific reference to England and Wales.  Within this framework a range of theoretical and practical topics will be addressed, including, legitimacy, accountability and representation, in relation to significant policies and programs. An analysis of police culture and ideology, in the context of human rights, democracy, and governance, will be undertaken as part of this. Also discussed will be the impact upon police strategies and practices of globalisation, consumerism, politicisation, and the New Public Management.

Semester 2

  • Researching crime, deviance and justice
    This module introduces students to key concepts, methods and techniques used in criminological research. Students learn how to evaluate the methodological choices of researchers and to conduct their own criminological research. Students are introduced to both qualitative methods in the first half and quantitative methods in the second half. Within each half the module focuses on evaluative criteria (e.g. ethics and measurement validity) for social research, data collection methods (e.g. qualitative interviews and surveys) and data analytic methods (e.g. grounded theory and statistical methods).
  • Youth, crime and delinquency  
    This module provides an overview of the development of youth crime as a specific area of criminological inquiry and a distinct jurisdiction within the criminal justice system. The Module considers the development of ‘delinquency’ as a specific field of intervention and investigation. It gives particular attention to the evolution of youth justice policies and examines current literature in relation to the strengths and limitations of the contemporary youth justice system.
  • The psychology of behaviour with others
    This module will provide you with the opportunity to explore a number of the major concepts, theories and methods encountered in understanding how and why we behave in the ways we do when in the presence of other humans. The focus of this module is to understand what psychologists have contributed to the understanding of our social behaviours according to the real, imagined or implied presence of other individuals. The module will focus on those approaches that have been used to examine a) whether we are social beings and why, b) what the ‘social’ brain looks like, c) how social behaviours develop across the lifespan, d) which mechanisms have been used to explain how we interact with the implied, real or imagined presence of others, e) how culture affects our social interactions, and f) how group membership affects our social behaviours. Assessment methods: 50% coursework, 50% exam.

Year 3

Semester 1

  • Gender, crime and justice
    The relationship between men, masculinity and crime; and women, femininity and crime has assumed increasing visibility and political significance within both criminology and the public arena. An understanding of both masculinities and femininities is central to this module. Drawing on feminist perspectives in criminological theory as well as more mainstream theoretical accounts, this module evaluates the evidence, which indicates that patterns of offending, victimisation and the workings of the main criminal justice agencies are gendered. The module also transgresses traditional debates in this area by considering a human rights perspective for the study of gender and crime.
  • Research project
    This level six double module covers two semesters and consists of the research for and completion of an academic project with a 9000-word limit. Each student chooses a subject relevant to the study of Sociology or Criminology in which they wish to specialize, and then uses the skills and knowledge that they have accumulated and developed through modules studied at previous levels to undertake and complete the project. During the whole process, from choice of subject to final submission, each student will have the support and guidance of a supervisor allocated for this purpose.

Optional modules

  • Counselling psychology and psychotherapy
    This module is designed primarily for students intending to go on to counselling psychology and psychotherapy postgraduate courses following their degree. Each week will include theoretical and practical components where you'll able to try out various approaches in role-plays and triad work. The theoretical component of the module will introduce you to key theoretical approaches in counselling psychology and psychotherapy, focusing on humanist/existential and cognitive behavioural, as well as covering various types of therapy, such as one-to-one, group therapy, brief therapy and relationship work. There will be a critical emphasis throughout considering issues of power, ethics, difference, and research on therapeutic effectiveness and processes. Assessment method: 100% coursework.
  • Development of brain and behaviour in infancy
    This module focuses on infancy, a period of rapid development, and examines the emergence of perceptual, cognitive, and early social skills during the first year of life. Emerging behaviours will also be related to brain development to facilitate a more thorough investigation of what happens during development. Traditional and more recent methods used to assess both brain and behaviour in infants will also be considered. This module will offer you the opportunity to consider a dominant theoretical debate in developmental psychology, that of the relative contributions of nature and nurture to development. The first part of the module will focus on typical development, while the second part will look at instances where development is atypical, such as in the case of developmental disorders (e.g. autism and Down syndrome) or the case of extreme environments (e.g. visual and environmental deprivation). Assessment method: 100% coursework.
  • Psychology of mental health
    Mental health is a highly contested area, with major disagreements amongst psychiatrists, psychologists and service users over the conceptualisation and treatment of mental health problems. This module will examine the theoretical differences between these perspectives by examining the social, cultural, biological and psychological evidence for the causes and maintenance of mental health problems. These factors will be looked at in general, and also in relation to specific forms of distress, such as depression, eating disorders and anxiety. The value and efficacy of diagnostic versus formulation approaches for the treatment of mental health problems will also be explored. Assessment methods: 50% coursework, 50% exam.
  • Health psychology
    Morbidity and mortality have been shown to be influenced significantly by various socio-demographic factors like age, social class and education. Which factors create the link between these inputs and health-related outputs is less clear. This module will explore theoretically-based psychological processes and mechanisms (e.g. cognitive dispositions and beliefs, social support, etc.) that have been shown to relate social inputs with health outcomes. In early sessions you'll explore social inequalities in health. During later sessions a number of models used by health psychologists to study related decision making and behaviour will be explored. Throughout all sessions you'll be exposed to applied implications and evidence derived from basic theoretical principles. Assessment methods: 60% coursework, 40% exam.
  • Psychology of inter- and intra- group processes
    This module will outline key issues in the study of intergroup and intra-group psychology and will explore social identity approaches. The module will then consider how groups interact with one another (inter-group processes) and also how group members function within the group (intra-group processes). The module combines theory with real social applications. Seminars will provide an opportunity to explore issues and research in more depth, and apply theory to real life situations. Assessment methods: 50% coursework, 50% exam.
  • Psychology of addictive behaviours
    This module will introduce you to theories of addictive behaviour. You'll address conceptual issues surrounding the utility of theories, and you'll discuss the empirical evidence for or against each theory. You'll have the opportunity to consider recent theories that attempt to synthesise extant models into a comprehensive account of addiction. You'll also have the opportunity to apply and critically evaluate several theories in regards to their ability to explain alcoholism, both during seminars and in your coursework assignment. Finally, you'll examine various treatment and preventative approaches, and the evidence for and against each. Assessment method: 100% coursework.

Semester 2

  • Research project
  • Contemporary criminology
    This module allows students to examine, in depth, contemporary and specific areas of criminological debate and theory. The module adopts a flexible design in response to current developments in the field of criminology and in the context of current social and political problems. Students will be encouraged to critically explore topics within the area and apply them to wider criminological debate and theory.

Optional modules

  • Art, awareness and the brain
    This module focuses on the subjective state of awareness as a phenomenal state, looking at both its biological underpinnings in the nervous system and its cultural manifestation in art. While each level is important in its own right for the study of psychology, so too is their interconnectedness, as each sheds light on the other, allowing a fuller and more integrated approach and deeper grasp of awareness that is ordinarily available. Assessment methods: 50% coursework, 50% exam.
  • Counselling psychology and psychotherapy
    This module is designed primarily for students intending to go on to counselling psychology and psychotherapy postgraduate courses following their degree. Each week will include theoretical and practical components where you'll able to try out various approaches in role-plays and triad work. The theoretical component of the module will introduce you to key theoretical approaches in counselling psychology and psychotherapy, focusing on humanist/existential and cognitive behavioural, as well as covering various types of therapy, such as one-to-one, group therapy, brief therapy and relationship work. There will be a critical emphasis throughout considering issues of power, ethics, difference, and research on therapeutic effectiveness and processes. Assessment method: 100% coursework.
  • Eyewitness psychology
  • Lifespan development
  • Neuropsychology
    This module begins with an introduction to the history of neuropsychology and its methods designed to lay foundations for the following content. Of particular importance is the relationship between normal and impaired functioning and the goal of deriving theories which explain both. The content areas examine different types of neuropsychological impairment, from traumatic brain injury, as found in Amnesic Syndrome, through the effects of strokes found in Unilateral Neglect to the pervasive effects of degenerative conditions such as Alzheimer's Disease. An important part of the module is an appraisal of the likelihood of recovery and efficacy of rehabilitation. The aim of the summative assessments is to examine both broad knowledge of the topic areas and the ability to critically examine issues in a selected topic area. Regular self assessed formative assessments will enable students to monitor their progress. Assessment methods: 40% coursework, 60% exam.
  • Thinking: past, present and future
    Cognitive science is the scientific study of thought. This module will provide you with the opportunity to explore some of the key theoretical debates in contemporary cognitive science, adopting a multidisciplinary approach to understanding the nature of thought and challenging assumptions concerning what it is to be human. The module will address the nature of the human mind in the past, present, and future, frequently using comparative psychology to identify those abilities that make us uniquely human and which mark us out from non-human animals and synthetic organisms. Assessment methods: 40% coursework, 60% exam.
  • Psychology of the workplace

Employability

Career opportunities

Students take part in voluntary work in the police service, the prison service, legal advice, victim support, domestic violence and child abuse agencies, youth offending and youth mentoring schemes. Many prefer to work for the police or criminal justice services, where there are countless opportunities to help the community with plenty of room for specialisation.

A humanities degree also has the real advantage of opening up careers in a number of professions such as teaching, social work, administration and higher level education. Other graduates have forged exciting careers in research, public relations, advertising, retail, management and media-related work.

Career roles

One popular role is as a probation officer working with offenders before, during and after they are sentenced. Possessing a great deal of patience, strong spoken communication skills and a non-judgemental attitude, a probation officer can be very rewarding work. A qualified probation officer can earn between £28,000-£35,000. (National Careers Service)

The police service also offers a wide variety of long-term opportunities providing a two-year probationary period is completed. Salaries after 5 years can be up to £30,000. (BBC News)

If you are willing to take further training, then social work is another alternative. Social Workers provide support and assistance to many individuals, families and groups, from the homeless to people with learning and physical disabilities. It's possible to earn up to £25,000 once qualified. (National Careers Service)

Career progression

The academic strength of our programmes has allowed many graduates to continue onto postgraduate degrees and academic research. We offer a number of applied postgraduate courses (heavily linked to the Department's nationally and internationally recognised research activities).

Postgraduate taught courses include:

Employability Service

We are University of the Year for Graduate Employment for the second year in a row - The Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2018, 2019.

At LSBU, we want to set you up for a successful career. During your studies – and for two years after you graduate – you’ll have access to our Employability Service, which includes:

  • An online board where you can see a wide range of placements: part-time, full-time or voluntary. You can also drop in to see our Job Shop advisers, who are always available to help you take the next step in your search.
  • Our Careers Gym offering group workshops on CVs, interview techniques and finding work experience, as well as regular presentations from employers across a range of sectors.

Our Student Enterprise team can also help you start your own business and develop valuable entrepreneurial skills.

Placements

Staff

Prof. Ian Albery

School/Division: Applied Sciences / Psychology
Job title: Professor of Psychology; Director of Research and Enterprise for the School of Applied Sciences

Ian Albery is Professor of Psychology and Director of Research and Enterprise for the School of Applied Sciences.


Dr Rashid Aziz

School/Division: Law and Social Sciences / Social Sciences
Job title: Senior Lecturer in Criminology; Course Director for Criminology undergraduate programmes

Dr Rashid Aziz is a Senior Lecturer in Criminology and Course Director for the Criminology undergraduate programmes in the Department of Social Sciences, School of Law and Social Sciences.


Dr Zoë Boden

School/Division: Applied Sciences / Psychology
Job title: Senior Lecturer; Course Director, MSc Mental Health and Clinical Psychology

Zoë Boden is a Senior Lecturer in Psychology and Course Director of the MSc Mental Health and Clinical Psychology.


Dr Matthew Bond

School/Division: Law and Social Sciences / Social Sciences
Job title: Course Director, Sociology

Dr Matthew Bond is Senior Lecturer in the Department of Social Sciences and Course Director of the Sociology undergraduate programme.


Dr Daniel Frings

School/Division: Applied Sciences / Psychology
Job title: Associate Professor

Daniel Frings is an Associate Professor of Psychology.


Dr Christine Magill

School/Division: Law and Social Sciences / Social Sciences
Job title: Senior Lecturer in Criminology; Course Director, MSc in Criminology and Social Research Methods

Dr Chris Magill is a Senior Lecturer in Criminology and the Course Director for the MSc in Criminology and Social Research Methods in the School of Law and Social Sciences and Course Director for the MSc in Criminology and Social Research Methods.


Prof. Antony Moss

School/Division: Applied Sciences / Psychology
Job title: Professor of Addictive Behaviour Science; Director of Education and Student Experience for the School of Applied Sciences

Antony Moss is Professor of Addictive Behaviour Science and Director of Education and Student Experience for the School of Applied Sciences.


Dr Elizabeth Newton

School/Division: Applied Sciences / Psychology
Job title: Senior Lecturer

Elizabeth Newton is a Senior Lecturer in Psychology.


Prof. Paula Reavey

School/Division: Applied Sciences / Psychology
Job title: Professor of Psychology; Director of Postgraduate Research for the School of Applied Sciences

Paula Ravey is Professor of Psychology and Director of Postgraduate Research for the School of Applied Sciences.


Dr Federica Rossi

School/Division: Law and Social Sciences / Social Sciences
Job title: Lecturer in Criminology; Course Director for Criminology undergraduate programmes

Dr Rossi is a Lecturer in Criminology and a Course Director for Criminology undergraduate programmes. She teaches Criminology, Sociology and Political Science, with particular interest in the criminalisation of political movements, political violence, terrorism, victims.


Edwin Shaw

School/Division: Law and Social Sciences / Social Sciences
Job title: Lecturer in Criminology and Politics

Edwin is a Lecturer in the Social Sciences Division, teaching and conducting research in politics and criminology.


Dr James Smith-Spark

School/Division: Applied Sciences / Psychology
Job title: Associate Professor; Deputy Head of Psychology

Jamie Smith-Spark is an Associate Professor of Psychology and Deputy Head of the Division of Psychology.


Dr Shaminder Takhar

School/Division: Law and Social Sciences / Social Sciences
Job title: Associate Professor in Sociology

Dr Shaminder Takhar is Associate Professor in Sociology specialising in race, gender, sexuality and social justice. She is the research ethics co-ordinator for the School of Law and Social Sciences.


Dr Eleni Vangeli

School/Division: Applied Sciences / Psychology
Job title: Senior Lecturer; Course Director, Undergraduate Psychology

Eleni Vangeli is a Senior Lecturer in Psychology and Course Director for undergraduate Psychology.


Facilities

Teaching and learning

Study hours

Year 1 class contact time is typically 9 hours per week plus individual tutorial and independent study.

Brief assessment outline

All modules are assessed by a combination of coursework, essays, exams, presentations, reports, case-studies, reviews and final year dissertation.

Research active academics

You will be taught by research-active academics whose work is internationally recognised and informs the course curriculum. You'll be encouraged to undertake your own research, from which you'll gain invaluable experience of social scientific research methods.

Percentage of time spent in different learning activities
Lectures and seminarsSelf-directed study
Year 122%78%
Year 222%78%
Year 317%83%

Criminology conference at LSBU

Staff are actively engaged in criminological research. On 13th September, Helen Easton, Senior Lecturer in Criminology, hosted a conference with international guest speakers titled "Overcoming the Stalemate: Progressing Change in Prostitution Laws in England and Wales".

Personal Academic Tutoring

As an undergraduate Law and Social Science student, you will be allocated a named tutor during your first semester at LSBU.  The role of your tutor is to be your primary contact for academic and professional development support.

Your tutor will support you to get the most of your time at LSBU, providing advice and signposting to other sources of support in the University. They should be the first person at the university that you speak to if you are having any difficulties that are affecting your work. These could be academic, financial, health-related or another type of problem.

You will have appointments with your personal academic tutor at least three times a year for 15 minutes throughout your course.  You can contact your tutor for additional support by email or sign up for an appointment slots advertised outside your tutor's office.

Entry requirements

2018 entry

  • A Level BCC or:
  • BTEC National Diploma MMM or:
  • Access to HE qualifications with 9 Distinctions and 36 Merits or:
  • Equivalent Level 3 qualifications worth 106 UCAS points
  • Applicants must hold 5 GCSEs A-C including Maths and English, or equivalent (reformed GCSEs grade 4 or above).

We welcome qualifications from around the world. English language qualifications for international students: IELTS score of 6.0, Cambridge Proficiency or Advanced Grade C.

Visit UCAS for guidance on the 2018 tariff.

How to apply

International students

International (non Home/EU) applicants should follow our international how to apply guide.

Instructions for Home/EU applicants
Mode Duration Start date Application code Application method
Mode
Full-time
Duration
3 years
Start date
September
Application code
M9C8
Application method

For full-time courses, please send your applications through the Universities and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) using our code L75. UCAS is the organisation responsible for managing applications to higher education courses in the UK.

For part-time courses, you can apply directly to the University.

For more details on how to apply (full-time and part-time) see our how to apply page.

Accommodation

Once we have made you an offer, you can apply for accommodation. You can rent from LSBU and you’ll deal directly with the university, not third party providers. That means we can guarantee you options to suit all budgets, with clear tenancy agreements and all-inclusive rents that include insurance for your personal belongings, internet access in each bedroom and on-site laundry facilities.

Or, if you’d rather rent privately, we can give you a list of landlords – just ask our Accommodation Service.

Read more about applying for accommodation at LSBU.

Finance

You don't need to wait for a confirmed place on a course to start applying for student finance. Read how to pay your fees as an undergraduate student.

Fees and funding

Fees are shown for new entrants to courses, for each individual year of a course, together with the total fee for all the years of a course. Continuing LSBU students should refer to the Finance section of our student portal, MyLSBU. Queries regarding fees should be directed to the Fees and Bursaries Team on: +44 (0)20 7815 6181.

Full-time
The fee shown is for entry 2018/19.
UK/EU fee: £9250International fee: £13125
AOS/LSBU code: 3540Session code: 1FS00
Total course fee:
UK/EU £27750
International £39375

For more information, including how and when to pay, see our fees and funding section for undergraduate students.

Please check your fee status and whether you are considered a Home, EU or International student for fee-paying purposes and for our regulatory returns, by reading the UKCISA regulations.

Possible fee changes

The University reserves the right to increase its fees in line with changes to legislation, regulation and any government guidance or decisions.

The fees for international students are reviewed annually and the University reserves the right to increase the tuition fees in line with the RPIX measure of inflation up to 4 per cent.

Scholarships

We offer several types of fee reduction through our scholarships and bursaries. Find the full list and other useful information on our scholarships page.

Stories

Select a story and read about practical project work, students' placement experiences, research projects, alumni career achievements and what it’s really like to study here from the student perspective.

Prepare to start

Applicant events

After you’ve received your offer we’ll send you emails about events we run to help you prepare for your course.

Welcome Week

Before you start your course we’ll send you information on what you’ll need to do before you arrive and during your first few days on campus. You can read about the process on our Welcome Week pages.

Getting started

You can start preparing for the course by following the news - quality newspapers, good TV news bulletins, Radio 4 news etc - particularly news about crime (politics of crime as well as actual crime stories.

Suggested reading list

It is valuable to do a bit of preparatory reading before you start the course, we suggest:

Criminology

  • M. Maguire, R. Morgan and R. Reiner (2012) (5th edn) The Oxford Handbook of Criminology. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  • S. Walklate (2003) (2nd edn) Understanding Criminology: Current theoretical debates. Buckingham: Open University Press.
  • R. Lippens (2009) A Very Short, Fairly Interesting and Reasonably Cheap Book about Studying Criminology. London: Sage.
  • J. Muncie and E. McLaughin (2001) The Problem of Crime. Sage/Open University: London.

Psychology

  • Bekerian, D.A & Levey, A.B (2005). Applied Psychology. Oxford: OUP
  • Glassman, W.E & Hadad, M (2004). Approaches to psychology. Open University Press
  • Davey, G., Albery, I.P., Chandler, C., Field, A., Messer, D., Moore, S & Sterling, C. (2004). Complete psychology. London: Hodder & Stoughton. o Read section five on social psychology.

 
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Contact information

Course Enquiries - UK

Tel: 0800 923 8888

Get in touch

Course Enquiries - EU/International

Tel: +44 (0) 20 7815 6189

Get in touch
 
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