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Criminology with Psychology BSc (Hons)

Unistats

What is Unistats?

Key Information Set (KIS) Data is only gathered for undergraduate full-time courses. There are a number of reasons why this course does not have KIS data associated with it. For example, it may be a franchise course run at a partner college or a course designed for continuing professional development.

Overview

Why do people commit crimes? How does the criminal mind work? In a world increasingly fascinated by the nature of crime and justice, this degree offers a contemporary view of crime and criminal justice within the context of the scientific study of human thought and behaviour.

6 reasons to study here

Great teaching: You'll be taught by research-active academics whose work is nationally and internationally recognised and informs the course curriculum.
Rated highly: No.2 London University overall in Criminology (Guardian League Table, 2018).
Industry relevant: Our courses in this field provide the practical experience employers demand - career areas include: probation, policing, the prison service, NGOs, local authorities, the voluntary sector, youth offending teams, teaching, social work and administration.
Academic progression: Graduates can apply for postgraduate courses, such as MSc Criminology and Social Research Methods, MSc Development Studies and MSc Refugee Studies.
Learning resources: You'll have access to a variety of helpful resources, including the Perry Library - indeed the University is the No.1 London Modern university for Learning Resources (National Student Survey 2016).
Work experience: Enhance your employability by taking part in our volunteering programme which covers a range of criminal justice-related agencies.

This degree course covers...

You'll have the opportunity to refine your cognitive, analytical, critical and research skills, and to translate these into research practice in the field of criminology and psychology. This course covers:

  • criminal justice
  • psychological approaches
  • politics and policy
  • policing
  • social behaviours
  • penal theory and policy
  • youth crime
  • drugs and crime
  • genocide.
Key course information - ordered by mode
Mode Duration Start date Location
Mode
Full-time
Duration
3 years
Start Date
September
Location
Southwark Campus
Mode
Part-time
Duration
5 years
Start Date
September
Location
Southwark Campus

Case studies

Modules

Methods of assessment for course overall: 67% coursework

Year 1

  • Introduction to criminological theory
    This module introduces you to key criminological theories. You'll examine the principal conceptual differences between these theories and how such concepts have been applied in the form of substantive research and policy. 
  • Issues in crime
    This module presents you with a range of distinct contemporary criminological issues and focuses on the ways in which fears and concerns about crime and the criminal justice system are related to issues such as governance, social exclusion and racial inequality. You'll engage with a range of different theories and learn how to appreciate how each relates to a specific issues. 
  • Criminal justice, politics and social policy
    This module provides a framework for examining the development of the criminal justice system and the general construction of the crime problem in the period from 1780s until the 1930s. It blends a discussion of institutional development with a socio-historical analysis of changing problems of crime. By examining criminological issues within a specific  political, historical and intellectual context this module provides a valuable underpinning for a range of modules in the programme. 
  • Deconstructing the crime problem
    What is crime? How and to what extent is the crime problem dispersed throughout contemporary British society? What do we know about current levels of crime in the UK and how do these compare historically?  These are some of the key questions addressed in this module which aims to introduce you to the basic anatomy of the crime problem. In addition to addressing specific questions concerning trends in different types of crime and social distribution of crime across society, you'll be encouraged to think about these issues in terms of broader social trends and relations.
  • Introducing psychological approaches
    You'll be introduced to the study of psychology, first by discussing its conceptual underpinnings and historical development, then topics related to living in the world as biological, learning and feeling beings.  Block 1 focuses on the philosophical foundations of Psychology, its status as a science and current identity, while Block 2 deals with evolutionary theory and the relationship of the brain to behaviour. Block 3 considers learning and Block 4 emotions from biological, psychological and social perspectives. The module provides the knowledge-base necessary for advanced study at level 5 and also the development of skills relating to factual learning, i.e., accessing, organising, assimilating and revising information. This module will help students develop skills relating to MCQ assessments. (The sister module in semester 2 will focus on communication and essay assessments.) 
  • Exploring psychological approaches

Year 2

  • Penal theory, policy and practice
    This module examines penal theory and practice in a theoretical, comparative and historical way, and engages critically with the theoretical justifications and policy proposals for punishment. The first part of this module examines the philosophical and historical bases of punishment in general and the prison in particular. The module focuses strongly on how the term crisis has been used to describe almost every aspect of the penal system. In particular it examines the background and current contexts of the crisis. The course also reflects on the concepts of 'place', 'space' and 'time' as sources of suffering and emphasises the significance of vulnerability and imprisonment. The course critically evaluates the future promise of the penal system through an examination of the issue of the privatisation of punishment and its role in future penal policy. 
  • Issues in contemporary policing
    This module offers an insight into key issues in contemporary policing. The module develops the student's understanding of the concepts of 'policing' and 'the police'. It explores a number of issues including: the historical origins of contemporary policing; the legitimacy of policing; police culture(s); the policing of private and public order; the privatisation of policing functions; the growth of transnational policing, together with an analysis of the significance of a human rights agenda for twenty-first century policing. It also considers the implications of globalisation for policing both on an organisational and conceptual level. Underlying such discussions is a critical focus on protection through a critical appreciation of the police function and role. 
  • Social research skills 2
    This module introduces students to the basics of qualitative research methodologies.  Students learn about central philosophical questions in the philosophy of the social sciences and how they relate to the qualitative/quantitative distinction.  Students are taught a range of qualitative data collection techniques ranging from interviews to archival research.  They are also introduced to different qualitative analytic techniques.  Finally they are made aware of the ethical issues that are specific to qualitative research.  Students are taught through lectures and workshops where they apply the principles to specific research questions.
  • Social research skills 1
    In the first half of this module students are introduced to basic issues in research design and methodology.  Topics covered include experimental design and random assignment, formulating research questions sampling and measurement.   In the second half of the module they learn the basics of statistical analysis and how to use SPSS. 
  • Psychology of feelings
    This module provides you with the opportunity to explore the interdependence between feelings and human behaviour.  The module is organised into three distinct themes, relationships, mood and sensations. Two introductory sessions will be used to recap and consolidate material at level 4 and provide a knowledge base upon which the rest of the module will build.   Then, within each theme a range of topics will be explored (see indicative content below), drawing on theory and research from biological, developmental, evolutionary, cross-cultural, cognitive and atypical psychology. Individual differences will be a key perspective in this module. 
  • Psychology of behaviour with others
    You'll be given the opportunity to explore a number of the major concepts, theories and methods encountered in understanding how and why we behave in the ways we do when in the presence of other humans. The module focuses on those approaches that have been used to examine a) whether we are social beings and why, b) what the 'social' brain looks like, c) how social behaviours develop across the lifespan, d) which mechanisms have been used to explain how we interact with the implied, real or imagined presence of others, e) how culture affects our social interactions, and f) how group membership affects our social behaviours.

Year 3

  • Gender, crime and justice
    An understanding of both masculinities and femininities is central to this module. Drawing on feminist perspectives in criminological theory as well as more mainstream theoretical accounts, this module evaluates the evidence, which indicates that patterns of offending, victimisation and the workings of the main criminal justice agencies are gendered. The module also transgresses traditional debates in this area by considering a human rights perspective for the study of gender and crime. 
  • Crime, criminology and modernity
    This module examines the emergence and development of criminology as an academic discipline in the context of the development of the human sciences and governmental needs of societies in the modern period. Whilst its main emphasis is on intellectual development It also explores how and in what ways such ideas come to be embodied in governmental policy, how this process transforms them and the conditions under which they decline both intellectually and in their application. 
  • Criminology research project (double module) 

Plus two optional modules from a range of psychology modules

Employability

We pay particular attention to the employability of our graduates, evidenced by a thriving volunteering project and the employment skills components of many of our modules. Graduates have gained employment in the public and private sectors, local and central government, as well as the voluntary sector.

BSc Criminology with Psychology will prepare you for a variety of careers, for example in probation, policing or the prison service. Our Criminology with Psychology graduates are valued highly by numerous employers including the Crown Prosecution Service and Social Support Services. Psychology is also highly regarded in many careers including market research, advertising, teaching and business generally.

Practical skills

Our courses in this field provide the practical experience employers demand, through our thriving volunteering project. Students take part in voluntary work in the police service, the prison service, legal advice, victim support, domestic violence and child abuse agencies, youth offending and youth mentoring schemes. Many prefer to work for the police or criminal justice services, where there are countless opportunities to help the community with plenty of room for specialisation.

There are a number of specialist careers in the voluntary, state and private sectors available to graduates of each of our disciplines. The subject of Criminology prepares students to work in the fields of probation, policing and the prison service, non-governmental organisations, work in local authorities and offending teams. Politics students tend to find employment in youth and community work, and work at various levels of government – including foreign ministries and national UN delegations. Career options for Social Policy graduates include: social work, policy analyst, civil servant and policy researcher.

A humanities degree also has the real advantage of opening up careers in a number of professions such as teaching, social work, administration and higher level education. Other graduates have forged exciting careers in research-related work, public relations, advertising, retail, management and media-related work.

Career roles

One popular role is as a probation officer working with offenders before, during and after they are sentenced. Possessing a great deal of patience, strong spoken communication skills and a non-judgemental attitude, a probation officer can be very rewarding work. A qualified probation officer can earn between £28,000-£35,000. (National Careers Service)

The police service also offers a wide variety of long-term opportunities providing a two-year probationary period is completed. Salaries after 5 years can be up to £30,000. (BBC News)

If you are willing to take further training, then social work is another alternative. Social Workers provide support and assistance to many individuals, families and groups, from the homeless to people with learning and physical disabilities. It's possible to earn up to £25,000 once qualified. (National Careers Service)

Career progression

The academic strength of our programmes has allowed many graduates to continue onto postgraduate degrees and academic research. At LSBU we offer a number of applied postgraduate courses (heavily linked to the Department's nationally and internationally recognised research activities).

Postgraduate taught courses include:

Recent graduates from this course have become Project Workers and Volunteer Support Workers, as well as considering entering the field of academic research.

LSBU Employability Service

We are University of the Year for Graduate Employment - The Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2018

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search.

As an LSBU student you have access to the Employability Service and its resources during your time here and for two years after you graduate.

Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or a placement/internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the career you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

  • Direct engagement from employers who come in to network with students
  • Job Shop – daily drop in service to help with, tailoring CVs, cover letters and applications, sourcing online resource, mock interviews and general job searching. One to one appointments for further support also available
  • Mentoring and work shadowing schemes
  • Higher education achievement report - The HEAR is designed to encourage a more sophisticated approach to recording student achievement, which acknowledges fully the range of opportunities that LSBU offers to our students.
    It pulls into one certificate: Module grades, Course descriptions, Placements, LSBU verified extra-curricular activities
  • Employability workshops - delivered free to students all year round on a variety of related topics
  • Careers fairs throughout the year to really focus your thoughts on a career after university

Find out about any of these services by visiting our student employability page

Placements

Staff

Prof. Ian Albery

School/Division: Applied Sciences / Psychology
Job title: Professor of Psychology; Director of Research and Enterprise for the School of Applied Sciences

Ian Albery is Professor of Psychology and Director of Research and Enterprise for the School of Applied Sciences.


Dr Zoë Boden

School/Division: Applied Sciences / Psychology
Job title: Senior Lecturer; Course Director, MSc Mental Health and Clinical Psychology

Zoë Boden is a Senior Lecturer in Psychology and Course Director of the MSc Mental Health and Clinical Psychology.


Dr Daniel Frings

School/Division: Applied Sciences / Psychology
Job title: Associate Professor

Daniel Frings is an Associate Professor of Psychology.


Dr Hillary Katz

School/Division: Applied Sciences / Psychology
Job title: Senior Lecturer

Hillary Katz is a Senior Lecturer in Psychology.


Dr Antony Moss

School/Division: Applied Sciences / Psychology
Job title: Director of Education and Student Experience for the School of Applied Sciences

Antony Moss is Director of Education and Student Experience for the School of Applied Sciences.


Dr Elizabeth Newton

School/Division: Applied Sciences / Psychology
Job title: Senior Lecturer

Elizabeth Newton is a Senior Lecturer in Psychology.


Prof. Paula Reavey

School/Division: Applied Sciences / Psychology
Job title: Professor of Psychology; Director of Postgraduate Research for the School of Applied Sciences

Paula Ravey is Professor of Psychology and Director of Postgraduate Research for the School of Applied Sciences.


Dr James Smith-Spark

School/Division: Applied Sciences / Psychology
Job title: Senior Lecturer; Deputy Head of Psychology

Jamie Smith-Spark is a Senior Lecturer in Psychology and Deputy Head of the Division of Psychology.


Dr Shaminder Takhar

School/Division: Law and Social Sciences / Social Sciences
Job title: Associate Professor in Sociology

Dr Shaminder Takhar is Associate Professor in Sociology specialising in race, gender, sexuality and social justice. She is the research ethics co-ordinator for the School of Law and Social Sciences.


Dr Eleni Vangeli

School/Division: Applied Sciences / Psychology
Job title: Senior Lecturer; Course Director, Undergraduate Psychology

Eleni Vangeli is a Senior Lecturer in Psychology and Course Director of Undergraduate Psychology.


Facilities

Teaching and learning

Study hours

Year 1 class contact time is typically 9 hours per week + individual tutorial + independent study.

Brief assessment outline

All modules are assessed by a combination of coursework, essays, exams, presentations, reports, case-studies, reviews and final year dissertation.

Research active academics

You'll be taught by research active academics whose work is nationally and internationally recognised and informs the course curriculum. You'll be encouraged to undertake your own research from which you'll gain invaluable experience of social scientific research methods.

Percentage of time spent in different learning activities
Lectures and seminarsSelf-directed study
Year 122%78%
Year 222%78%
Year 317%83%

Criminology conference at LSBU

At LSBU, Criminology staff are actively engaged in criminological research and in making a difference to local, national and international criminal justice policy. On 13th September, Helen Easton, Senior Lecturer in Criminology, hosted a conference with international guest speakers titled "Overcoming the Stalemate: Progressing Change in Prostitution Laws in England and Wales".

Entry requirements

2018 entry

  • A Level BCC or:
  • BTEC National Diploma MMM or:
  • Access to HE qualifications with 9 Distinctions and 36 Merits or:
  • Equivalent Level 3 qualifications worth 106 UCAS points
  • Applicants must hold 5 GCSEs A-C including Maths and English, or equivalent (reformed GCSEs grade 4 or above).

We welcome qualifications from around the world. English language qualifications for international students: IELTS score of 6.0, Cambridge Proficiency or Advanced Grade C.

Visit UCAS for guidance on the 2018 tariff.

How to apply

International (non Home/EU) applicants should follow our international how to apply guide.

Instructions for Home/EU applicants
Mode Duration Start date Application code Application method
Mode
Full-time
Duration
3 years
Start date
September
Application code
M9C8
Application method
Mode
Part-time
Duration
5 years
Start date
September
Application code
4117
Application method

All full-time undergraduate students apply to the Universities and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) using the University's Institution Code L75. Full details of how to do this are supplied on our How to apply webpage for undergraduate students.

All part-time students should apply directly to London South Bank University and full details of how to do this are given on our undergraduate How to apply webpage.

Accommodation

Students should apply for accommodation at London South Bank University (LSBU) as soon as possible, once we have made an offer of a place on one of our academic courses. Read more about applying for accommodation at LSBU.

Finance

It's a good idea to think about how you'll pay university tuition and maintenance costs while you're still applying for a place to study. Remember – you don't need to wait for a confirmed place on a course to start applying for student finance. Read how to pay your fees as an undergraduate student.

Fees and funding

Fees are shown for new entrants to courses, for each individual year of a course, together with the total fee for all the years of a course. Continuing LSBU students should refer to the Finance section of our student portal, MyLSBU. Queries regarding fees should be directed to the Fees and Bursary Team on: +44 (0)20 7815 6181.

Full-time
The fee shown is for entry 2017/18.
UK/EU fee: £9250International fee: £12500
AOS/LSBU code: 3540Session code: 1FS00
Total course fee:
UK/EU £27750
International £37500

For more information, including how and when to pay, see our fees and funding section for undergraduate students.

Possible fee changes

Current regulatory proposals suggest that institutions will be permitted to increase fee levels in line with inflation up to a specified fee cap. Specifically, LSBU may be permitted to increase its fees for new and existing Home and EU undergraduate students from 2017/18 onwards. The University reserves the right to increase its fees in line with changes to legislation, regulation and any governmental guidance or decisions.

The fees for international students are reviewed annually, and additionally the University reserves the right to increase tuition fees in line with inflation up to 4 per cent.

Scholarships

We offer students considerable financial help through scholarships, bursaries, charitable funds, loans and other financial support. Many of our scholarships are given as direct tuition fee discounts and we encourage all eligible students to apply for our Access Bursary. New home full-time undergraduate students meeting eligibility criteria could receive a £1,000 cash bursary by joining us in the 2017/18 academic year. Find out more about all our scholarships and fee discounts for undergraduate students.

International students

As well as being potentially eligible for our undergraduate scholarships, International students can also benefit from a range of specialist scholarships. Find out more about International scholarships.

Please check your fee status and whether you are considered a home, EU or international student for fee-paying purposes by reading the UKCISA regulations.

Case studies

Select a case study and read about practical project work, students' placement experiences, research projects, alumni career achievements and what it’s really like to study here from the student perspective.

Prepare to start

We help our students prepare for university even before the semester starts. To find out when you should apply for your LSBU accommodation or student finance read the How to apply tab for this course.

Applicant Open Days

To help you and your family feel confident about your university choice we run Applicant Open Days. These are held at subject level so students start getting to know each other and the academic staff who will be teaching them. These events are for applicants only and as an applicant you would receive an email invitation to attend the relevant event for your subject.

Enrolment and Induction

Enrolment takes place before you start your course. On completing the process, new students formally join the University. Enrolment consists of two stages: online, and your face-to-face enrolment meeting. The online process is an online data gathering exercise that you will complete yourself, then you will be invited to your face-to-face enrolment meeting.

In September, applicants who have accepted an unconditional offer to study at LSBU will be sent details of induction, which is when they are welcomed to the University and their School. Induction helps you get the best out of your university experience, and makes sure you have all the tools to succeed in your studies.

Read more about Enrolment and Induction.

Getting started

You can start preparing for the course by following the news - quality newspapers, good TV news bulletins, Radio 4 news etc - particularly news about crime (politics of crime as well as actual crime stories. 

Suggested reading list

It is valuable to do a bit of preparatory reading before you start the course, we suggest:

Criminology 

  • M. Maguire, R. Morgan and R. Reiner (2012) (5th edn) The Oxford Handbook of Criminology. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 
  • S. Walklate (2003) (2nd edn) Understanding Criminology: Current theoretical debates. Buckingham: Open University Press. 
  • R. Lippens (2009) A Very Short, Fairly Interesting and Reasonably Cheap Book about Studying Criminology. London: Sage. 
  • J. Muncie and E. McLaughin (2001) The Problem of Crime. Sage/Open University: London. 

Psychology 

  • Bekerian, D.A & Levey, A.B (2005). Applied Psychology. Oxford: OUP 
  • Glassman, W.E & Hadad, M (2004). Approaches to psychology. Open University Press 
  • Davey, G., Albery, I.P., Chandler, C., Field, A., Messer, D., Moore, S & Sterling, C. (2004). Complete psychology. London: Hodder & Stoughton. o Read section five on social psychology.
 
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Open Days and Events
Teaching excellence framework
Contact information

Course Enquiries - UK/EU

Tel: 0800 923 8888

Tel: +44 (0) 20 7815 6100

Get in touch

Course Enquiries - International

Tel: +44 (0) 20 7815 6189

Get in touch
 
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