Dr Clara Eroukhmanoff

Dr Clara Eroukhmanoff

Lecurer in International Relations

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  • Telephone:
    020 7815 5724
  • School/Division:
    Law and Social Sciences / Social Sciences
 

Clara is Course Director of the International Relations Degree at London South Bank University.

Prior to joining LSBU, she was a teaching fellow at Royal Holloway (London) in the department of Politics and International Relations. She has been awarded a PhD by the University of St Andrews on the securitisation of Islam in the United States. She is currently working on her first monograph with Manchester University Press on this topic, where she develops the idea of 'indirect securitisation' and applies it empirically to the ways in which Muslim communities are securitised in the United States.

Clara is also co-convener of the BISA Working Group on “Emotions in Politics and International Relations,” with Naomi Head (Glasgow) and Amanda Beattie (Aston).

Clara’s current research is broadly situated at the intersection of critical security studies, US foreign policy and feminist writing in IR. She is particularly interested in the ways in which Islam has been securitised since the September 11 attacks and the subsequent (counter)-radicalisation discourses and practices in the United States and the United Kingdom, as well as Islamophobia, and the affective responses of solidarity to victims of terrorism. She explores how elite speakers like the president of the United States, the police and the intelligence community in the US construct the threat of terrorism.

Clara is the Course Director for the International Relations programme and teaches a number of modules at LSBU (Introduction to International Relations, International Relations Theory, Foreign Policy Analysis, International Security.)

She has previously taught a number of courses in International Relations at the University of St Andrews, the University of Edinburgh and Royal Holloway.

Clara thoroughly enjoys teaching and building a strong relationship with her students. Her philosophy of teaching relies on developing a critical approach to IR by turning the subject ‘on its head’ from the second half of the term.

She was awarded ‘best teacher in improving the life of students’ at Royal Holloway in 2017.

Clara’s current research is broadly situated at the intersection of critical security studies, US foreign policy and feminist writing in IR. One strand of research examines the linguistic and emotional constructions of terrorism and radicalisation in the United States from the G.W Bush to the Trump administration. She is more particularly interested in what she refers as an ‘indirect securitisation,’ a securitisation that occurs through indirect securitising speech acts and the affective process of indirect securitisations.

Clara is also interested in how gender is intertwined with international security, for example, what Trump’s comments about “grabbing them by the pussy” and his justification that this was mere “locker room banter” can say about hypermasculine military practices.

Her more recent work interrogates the visual responses communicated through memes like ‘Je suis Charlie,’ ‘I love Manchester’ and ‘One Love’ and the kind of emotional governance and narratives these digital movements bring forward. Through a Deleuzian reading of sensation, a central theme of this work is to investigate the kind of affects solidarity memes charge the atmosphere with and how art can disrupt dominant narratives of the war on terrorism. This work is situated in the wider affective and visual turns in International Relations and is forthcoming in a special issue on emotions in the Journal of International Political Theory. She is keen to collaborate with artists on this project.

More generally, Clara’s research is critical in the sense of thinking change, agency and emancipation from hegemonic structures. Clara is published in Critical Terrorism Studies, International Studies Review and Critical Studies on Security.

Most recent publications

Eroukhmanoff, C Securing diplomacy in the war on terrorism: a critical perspective. In: Diplomatic Security. Stanford University Press, Stanford,

Eroukhmanoff, C Scholars’ agency in securitisation: a leap forward. The Duck of Minerva [blog],

Eroukhmanoff, C ‘It’s not a Muslim ban!’ Indirect speech acts and the securitisation of Islam in the United States post-9/11. Global Discourse / Global Discourse: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Current Affairs and Applied Contemporary Thought, 8. 5-25. DOI 10.1080/23269995.2018.1439873

Eroukhmanoff, C and Teles Fazendeiro, BTF Emotions and Time: Approaching Emotions through a Fusion of Horizons. In: Researching emotions in International Relations: Methodological perspectives for a new paradigm. Palgrave Macmillan, pp. 255-276. ISBN 978-3-319-65574-1 DOI 10.1007/978-3-319-65575-8

Eroukhmanoff, C Securitisation Theory. In: International Relations Theory. E-International Relations Publishing, Bristol,

Bentley, M and Eroukhmanoff, C and Hackett, U 100 Days of Trump: Security and Foreign Policy Implications. Critical Studies on Security, 5. 1-2. DOI 10.1080/21624887.2017.1355153

Eroukhmanoff, C A Feminist Reading of Foreign Policy under Trump: Mother of All Bombs, Wall, and the “Locker Room Banter”. critical studies on security, 5. DOI 10.1080/21624887.2017.1355156

Eroukhmanoff, C A Critical Contribution to the “Security-Religion” Nexus: Going Beyond the Analytical. International Studies Review, 18. 366-378. DOI 10.1093/isr/viw008

Eroukhmanoff, C The remote securitisation of Islam in the US post-9/11: euphemisation, metaphors and the “logic of expected consequences” in counter-radicalisation discourse. Critical Studies on Terrorism, 8. 246-265. DOI 10.1080/17539153.2015.1053747

More publications at LSBU Research Open

Clara Eroukhmanoff is co-convenor of the BISA Working Group on ‘emotions in International Relations’ with Naomi Head (Glasgow) and Amanda Beattie (Aston).

Clara is a fellow at the Centre for International Public Policy at Royal Holloway University and a research associate with the University of Cambridge (POLIS) where she worked on a project entitled ‘Media, Faith and Security’ with Roxanne Farmanfarmaian and funded by an ESRC Impact Acceleration Grant. With Roxanne and other research associates, she organised a day workshop at the House of Lords with members of the media, members of parliament and various faith communities, in order to reach an understanding and respect of religious practice and freedom of press in a post-Charlie attacks environment.

 
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